Arzak Secrets by Juan Mari Arzak [pdf, epub] 1910690082

Arzak Secrets

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  • Title: Arzak Secrets
  • Autor: Juan Mari Arzak
  • Publisher (Publication Date): Grub Street Cookery; y First edition edition (December 19, 2015)
  • Language: English

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Published in 2015 by

Grub Street

4 Rainham Close

London SW11 6SS

Email: [email protected]

Web: www.grubstreet.co.uk

Twitter: @grub_street

Facebook: Grub Street Publishing

Reprinted 2015

First published in Spanish by Bainet editorial S.A.

Text copyright © Juan Mari Arzak

Copyright this English language edition © Grub Street 2015

Translated by Heather Maisner

A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

ISBN 978-1-910690-08-6

eISBN 978-1-911621-68-3

Mobi ISBN 978-1-911621-68-3

The moral right of the author has been asserted.

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the above publisher of this book.

 

 

Prologue

 

It isn’t particularly difficult to explain the intention of this book to curious readers. The title is highly significant. The idea of culinary secrets takes us back in time to an outdated belief in jealously guarding recipes and culinary formulae, as if they were ‘cloths of gold’. This secrecy was so great that in many restaurants, individuals, mainly apprentices, were forced to give back or hide any sauce or dish, invented by the chef of the house, that they had finished off or flavoured in a personal way. One story reveals this perfectly. Everyone knows about Russian salad, a dish that has long been popular in many places, not only here but throughout Europe. This salad was known as ‘Salad Olivier’, as it still is in classical recipes. It seems that in 1860 the French chef Lucien Olivier, who was co-owner of the Hermitage, a trendy restaurant in Moscow’s Trubnaya Square, created a motley salad that was an immediate success. But following the guidelines of the time, the chef kept secret, not only the ingredients in his recipe, but also all the spices and seasonings. What’s more, he went to the grave (I believe he is certainly buried in the Moscow cemetery) with the secrets of that salad. Only after questioning many Hermitage diners, who had enjoyed the dish at the time, could the Olivier salad ingredients and different dressings be unravelled in a more or less verbal way. Today this is unthinkable. At any event, the secrets of our cookery can be said to be ‘open secrets’, constantly disseminated through works like this, newspapers and magazines of all kinds, as well as countless websites and internet blogs, providing information to the entire planet in seconds. Far from being a handkerchief, the world is now a tablecloth.

Therefore, ‘the secrets’ mentioned in this book are nothing but the wide open doors of our kitchen. Particularly our research laboratory, discovering many, many small cookery products and new techniques, ideas for fun combinations, visual explosions that help with the understanding of the cuisine’s recipes, which, without denying the complexity, sometimes opt for simple, but not simplistic, solutions, in that what really matters is the very occurrence of their creation. All this is based on the apt words of the great artist Javier Mariscal, ‘when in doubt, simplicity’.

Furthermore, I do not have sleepless nights trying to summarize the secret of the newness of Arzak’s cuisine, as you can infer from reading this book.

It is a cuisine with a very specific personality, responding to the taste and expertise of those who make up the team that researches and produces this cuisine. But of course, we are not Martians, and it is a Basque cuisine with concrete roots and above all tastes, that can be called idiosyncratic tastes (ways of being, in this case, eating, collective ownership, Basque), to be respected and not thrown overboard. Another key facet of our culinary work is that of research, an important factor in the development of all enterprises and, of course, the most creative. I like to emphasize that Arzak is no longer a lone person, who, in his day, why not say it, was a precursor, travelled, courageous, always with great boldness. It is a team, who investigates, tastes and tests everything and gives the best, i.e., shows diners eager for new experiences, only a small percentage, the minimum best of that which has been investigated. Precisely because this is an evolutionary cuisine, not a culinary success dying or living off the greatness of a series of perfect formulas in technique or taste. And it needs to be constantly moving forward in order not to stagnate. And that brings us to the end of these definitions: it is an avant-garde cuisine, which is not cloning other leading cuisines or has few that are similar, surrenders to no-one, but prefers to lead, with all the risks involved, and, along with other great chefs, to keep Basque cuisine and therefore also Spanish cuisine, at the spearhead of permanent renovation in the world.

I believe this work is a small sample of the above. Especially in the aspect I wish to highlight. Teamwork. Thus, in the creation and practical development of these recipes, as always, the entire team has bent over backwards. From my daughter Elena, who contributed many ideas, thoughts and suggestions; to chef, Pello Aramburu (and everyone around him), above all with their practical qualifications, and, of course, at the heart of responsibility, Xabi Gutiérrez, creative head of our research laboratory, and another key person, his right hand man, the young Igor Zalakain, who painstakingly synthesized all creations into practice. We cannot forget the importance of the visual element today and, through the front door, here comes the hugely professional photographer and close friend, Mikel Alonso, who unusually in the graphic collaboration of many less impressive books, takes us stunningly through the eye to the essence of each recipe. Nor can I fail to include in our team, the pen of another great friend and collaborator Mikel Corcuera, who can interpret what I think better than anyone, and with whom once again, I have easily been able to provide the glossary to our unique cookbook with precision and depth.

I also have to thank my good friends the Spanish publishers Bainet Editorial, who again bet on us to produce a complex work that will hopefully enjoy success to be shared for the good of all. And to Grub Street, the publishers of the English edition.

 

 

Juan Mari

 

 

Oils, new colours, aromas and flavours

 

 

About twenty years ago, I started to experiment with smoothies or vegetable, herb and fruit juices, incorporating them into different types of oils. From the start, and also in later research, the cookery team and I prepared and tested many combinations.

It is undoubtedly common in cookery, above all in the Mediterranean (especially in the most modern cookery – and the author’s), to use these oils in profusion. Aromatic oils increase the taste quality of a dish. They are easy to prepare, in terms of combinations of ingredients, because there are hundreds of them… just unleash the imagination of each cook. Basil or parsley, tarragon or rosemary, with spinach or garlic, with lemon, orange or tangerine peel, passion fruit and other exotic fruits, with oils sweet or spicy. Also with cardamom, green pepper or cinnamon. I recall some dishes that gave almost more attention to these details, and the taste of the aromatic oils in sauces and, especially, in vinaigrettes, that enhanced the raw material of the dish. Base oils: of course, our fantastic extra virgin olive oil but also walnut, peanut, corn, hazelnut or sunflower oil.

Prawns en escabeche, marinated with a striking and equally tasty beetroot oil. Baby squid grilled in corn oil with a sweet corn smoothie, or a squid oil to enhance a mackerel with chive vinaigrette. A unique olive oil with chorizo for cod with ‘kokotxas’ Pil Pil. And for a light dessert, a neutral sunflower oil flavoured with vanilla, escorting a pineapple cooked in rum with hazelnut foam. And so on, to name a few dishes I find hard to forget.

One of our latest offerings is a creamy avocado oil, a subtle touch in a broth of tomato, peach and vinegar, marinating slices of bonito covered with cheese foam.

 

 

tomato with cheese and a touch of avocado

 

ingredients

 

6 people

For the stock

80 g peach flesh

1 tablespoon sugar

250 g ripe tomatoes

20 g extra virgin olive oil

70 g avocado oil

1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

salt

black pepper

For cubes of marinated bonito

100 g bonito

250 ml water

250 ml white wine vinegar

50 ml olive oil

salt

For cheese foam

300 g milk

100 g smoked Idiazabal cheese, with rind

100 g cream

 

 

method

 

For the stock

Cut the peach flesh and sauté lightly with sugar. Chop the tomatoes and mash them together with the peach; emulsify with olive and avocado oils. Strain through a chinois, add the vinegar and season.

For the cubes of marinated bonito

Cut tuna in chunks and marinate in the mixture of water and vinegar for half an hour. Drain and place in the olive oil until used.

For the cheese foam

Blend all the ingredients and strain through a chinois. Fill the siphon, tighten the cap and shake. Remove the cap and leave to stand in the refrigerator. Pour the contents of the siphon over liquid nitrogen. Leave it to harden well and then break it up.

Drain the marinated tuna cubes, add a pinch of salt, place in a bowl and pour the tomato and peach broth over them. Place the cold cheese foam over the broth.

 

 

Sea vegetables

 

 

Many years ago, in the introduction to his landmark book The Kitchen Market, my great friend Paul Bocuse used a prescient sentence that really got me thinking: ‘These days, whoever wants to get on, must go round the world. And’, he continued: ‘Whenever I move to a new country, I return brimming with ideas.’ Our new food movement of the seventies captured this need and introduced – if only in an incipient way – the use of exotic algae, together with other products which are now almost common place.

In the Western world, sea vegetables have mostly been hailed for their medicinal properties to the detriment of their great culinary possibilities: even the ancient Greeks and Romans ignored them. Only along the coasts of Britain and the British Isles, has there been a tradition – for some thousand years – of consuming the algae that proliferate along these coasts, for example sea lettuce, which is sometimes added to oatmeal cakes.

By contrast, for over ten thousand years seaweeds have been an essential element in the diet of most Asian populations, particularly the Japanese, where there are extraordinary dishes that use different types of algae.

It is important to note that there are many kinds of algae and, not only does each have a different flavour and texture, but also a different culinary use. Thus, kombu, known as Laminaria gigante, is the basis of the delicious Japanese stocks, the dashi. Furthermore, when added to vegetables, it softens them and makes them more digestible. One of the best-known algae is perhaps nori, sold in sheets, and recognisable as a wrapper on the equally famous sushi.

And how can one not mention agar agar (Gelidium cantilagineum), a gelatineous red algae, very flexible and resilient despite its intricate branches. It is also known by the following names: agar, gelosina, vegetable gelatine, Chinese gelatine, and Japanese fish tail.

Its extract, also called agar agar, is colourless and tasteless, and absorbs water between 200 and 300 times its weight, forming a gelatine.

Culinarily it is important because it is a gel that maintains its gelling power when both warm and hot, which does not happen with other gelatines that only do so when cold.

 

 

Lamb with Café ‘Cortado’

 

 

ingredients

 

4 people

For the raisin sauce

40 g raisins

15 g brandy

35 g fried almonds

1 small tomato

20 g cooked garlic

15 g virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

salt

pepper

For the lamb

800 g rack of lamb (200 g per serving)

For the lamb sauce

500 g lamb bones

2 onions

1 clove garlic

250 ml water

250 ml lamb stock

1 small onion safflower threads

salt

pepper

For the mint leaves

12 mint leaves

50 ml olive oil

For the veils of milk coffee

2 g decaffinated coffee powder

8 g agar agar

1.5 g icing sugar

1.5 g powdered milk

In addition

virgin olive oil

safflower threads

 

 

method

 

For the raisin sauce

Blend all ingredients and season. Set aside.

For the lamb

Thoroughly clean the rack and cut into portions. Coat the pieces with the sauce and brown well on both sides. Set aside.

For the lamb sauce

Colour the bones slightly with a dash of oil. Add garlic and onions cut into strips and sauté for a few minutes.

Deglaze and moisten with the lamb stock and the water. Cook on a low flame for 2 hours. Strain. Add the onion cut into thin rings and the safflower threads. Season with salt and pepper.

For the mint leaves

Blanch in boiling water. Then cool well, spread out and crush. Cover with the oil and set aside.

For the veils of milk coffee

Mix all ingredients and reduce them to powder. Grease a 10 x 20 cm plastic mould with a little oil. Distribute the powder and shake the mould so that the excess falls off. Cook the mould upside down in a steamer at 119°C for 15 seconds. Remove from the steamer and remove the veil that will have formed in the mould.

Spread the mint over the bottom of a dish along with a few strands of safflower and a few drops of oil. Arrange the lamb in the centre of the dish, wrapped in the veil, giving height and volume to the whole. In this way present it to the diners, with the sauce in a separate jug. In front of the diners, pour the very hot sauce over the veil, making it disappear.

 

 

Lamb with green sponge cake

 

ingredients

 

4 people

For the green sauce

50 g olive oil, 25 g spinach purée, 10 g pistachio paste,

25 g codium algae, the pulp of a passion fruit, 15 g green papaya, ½ kiwi (peeled),

25 g fried almonds, salt, pepper

For the lamb

800 g rack of lamb (200 g per serving)

For the pistachio sponge cake

3 eggs, 60 g sugar, 60 g flour, 15 g spinach purée, 2.5 g freeze-dried spinach,

10 g nori seaweed, 2.5 g green tea

For the green oil

60 g olive oil, 60 g parsley (stems included), 5 g nori seaweed, salt

For the lamb sauce

500 g lamb bones, 1 clove garlic, 2 onions, 1 shallot, 250 ml water,

250 ml lamb stock, salt, pepper, safflower threads

For the melting sheet

100 g cocoa butter, 3 g freeze-dried parsley, 3 g freeze-dried barley,

3 g freeze-dried chives, 1 g salt

In addition

green papaya, cut in cubes

mint, cut into small pieces

parsley powder

fried papaya seeds

 

 

method

 

For the green sauce

Purée all ingredients, forming a paste. Season and reserve.

For the lamb

Thoroughly clean the rack and cut into portions. Coat the pieces with the sauce and brown well on both sides. Set aside.

For the pistachio sponge cake

Beat the eggs with the sugar until they are thick and foamy. Gently add the flour without letting the mixture collapse. At the last moment, gently incorporate the spinach mixture, shredded nori and tea. Bake in a cake mould at 180°C for 18 minutes. Remove from mould and set aside.

For the green oil

Purée the ingredients. Strain and season lightly. Set aside.

For the lamb sauce

Colour the bones lightly with a dash of oil. Add the garlic, onions and shallot cut into strips and sauté for a few minutes. Deglaze and moisten with the stock and the water.

Cook over a low heat for 90 minutes. Strain and add a pinch of salt and pepper. Finish the sauce by adding 60 g of green oil and a pinch of safflower.

For the melting sheet

Melt the butter at under 60°C. Add the remaining ingredients.

Spread in a thin layer over two sheets of greaseproof paper. Leave to cool. Once cold, cut it and store in the refrigerator.

Place the squares of papaya, fried papaya seeds, chopped mint, crumbled pistachio sponge cake and parsley powder on the bottom of a dish. Arrange the lamb in the centre of the dish and lightly season.

At the table and in front of the diners, place the melting sheets over the lamb, making them disappear, contributing the oily touch to the dish.

 

 

Crayfish on mushroom and seaweed ‘lichen’

 

ingredients

 

4 people

For the crayfish

8 crayfish (at least 100 g each)

100 ml olive oil

20 g mushroom powder

salt

ginger

liquorice powder

For the corn sauce

50 ml olive oil

1 onion

the crayfish heads

1 vanilla pod

100 g fresh corn

salt

pepper

For the black mushroom sauce

1 onion

100 g corn mushroom powder (huitlacoche)

10 g Marcona almonds

50 ml olive oil

salt

ground ginger

For the crispy mushroom

350 g corn water

100 g corn oil

40 g cornflour (corn starch)

10 g corn mushroom powder (huitlacoche)

For the vinaigrette

100 ml olive oil

5 g beer yeast

10 g brie cheese rind

10 g rice vinegar

5 g sugar

1 g lavender

salt

pepper

For the fried seaweed

200 g sea lettuce (Ulva rigida)

1 clove garlic, chopped

2 tablespoons olive oil

In addition

50 g fresh ground corn (add a little water if necessary)

virgin olive oil

 

 

method

 

For the crayfish

Split the crayfish in half and place the body to one side and the pinchers and head to the other. Keep the heads for the sauce and save the pinchers for other uses.

Place a skewer lengthwise through each crayfish so that the tails do not bend during cooking. Blanch lightly in boiling water and then cool rapidly in iced water. Peel them. Season with salt and pepper and lightly season with ginger and liquorice powder. At the last moment, cook over a high heat and add the mushroom and oil mixture. Set aside.

For the corn sauce

Clean the onion, cut and fry it in a pan with half the oil. Then add the crayfish heads and sauté together. Add the corn and the vanilla pod cut in half. Cover with water and cook for 1 hour. Remove the vanilla and blend. Strain through a chinois and season.

For the black mushroom sauce

Clean the onion, cut and fry it in a pan with half the oil. Add the remaining ingredients. Lightly cook then grind to a paste. Season and add a pinch of ginger.

For the crispy mushroom

Cold mix all the ingredients, except the corn mushroom, and place over the surface of a slightly warm non-stick pan. Allow to evaporate completely so that it becomes a kind of a crispy lichen. Remove and sprinkle with powdered corn mushroom. Store in a dry place until used.

For the vinaigrette

Slightly chop the cheese rind and cold mix it with the rest of the ingredients. Add salt and pepper.

For the fried seaweed

De-salt the seaweed in cold water for approximately 2 hours. Drain well and sauté with the chopped garlic.

Add the fresh corn purée to 50 g of the corn sauce. Bring to the boil and add a tablespoon of virgin olive oil.

Spread the corn sauce across both sides of the dish. Heat the dish on the salamander so that the sauce dries quickly. Arrange the crayfish, seasoned with the vinaigrette, in the centre of the dish and place the crunchy ‘lichen’ over the crayfish.

 

 

The flavour of porcelain

 

Is there anyone who doesn’t know, or hasn’t heard about, clay, also known as kaolin or kaolinite, a very pure white clay, which is used to make porcelain and primers for starching. It is also used in some medications and for producing cosmetics, and when the quality isn’t very pure, it’s used to manufacture paper.

The word kaolin comes from the Chinese kao = high and ling = hill, indicating the place in Jiangxi Province, near Jauchu Fa, where the Chinese first encountered this type of natural clay. Since ancient times it has also been used as a healing agent in many cultures. Like other clays, such as green clay, it is rich in hydrated aluminium silicates but poor in trace elements. It also contains significant amounts of other minerals, such as magnesium, calcium, copper, zinc, cobalt, iron and selenium.

It has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and healing qualities. And for internal use, it protects the gastric and intestinal mucus as it speeds up healing. It helps capture harmful substances, adheres to them and then drags them to the outside. For external use, it can be applied as a plaster or mask; it is also interesting as a mouthwash and a powder similar to talcum powder for babies.

What is new is the sudden use of this natural product in cookery, as introduced by the most creative and cutting-edge chefs: among others, Andoni Luis Adúriz, chef at Mugaritz of Errenteria, with his great ‘devilry’ of ‘Potatoes Cooked in Clay’ (in this case grey clay) served with a light garlic mayonnaise.

In our case, we use white clay in a creation that has had a great impact, not only visual and for its gustatory delicacy but also because of the uniqueness of the product itself. A dish in which one of the emblematic fish of Basque cuisine, the hake, is combined with the novel clay, which makes a double appearance, both in the sauce under the hake and the curd that escorts it, as well as in the sauce that is initially spread over the fish.

 

 

Hake and white clay

 

ingredients

 

4 people

For the white clay sauce

20 g toasted bread

30 g toasted pine nuts

100 g olive oil

5 g white clay

30 g gently sautéed leek

salt

ground pepper

chopped parsley

For the hake

4 hake fillets (150 g per serving)

freeze-dried hake powder

For the white clay paint

25 g Marcona almonds

25 g pine nuts

50 ml olive oil

15 g sugar

10 g coconut flesh

3 tablespoons white Martini

500 g fish fumet

10 g white clay

salt

pepper

For the green sauce and veal cheek juice

150 g salsa verde

20 g stewed veal cheek sauce

15 g olive oil

salt

pepper

For the clay curd

¼ head of garlic

¼ Zopako bread

(not overly toasted)

500 g water

60 g onion

50 g leek

25 g fresh garlic

10 g Marcona almonds

15 g pine nuts

5 g sugar

10 g coconut flesh

2 tablespoons white Martini

250 g fish fumet

10 g white clay

agar agar (1g for each 100g)

olive oil

salt

pepper

To discolour the parsley

50 g parsley leaves

250 ml ethyl alcohol

 

 

method

 

For the white clay sauce

Blend all of the ingredients to form a paste. Season with salt and pepper and add the chopped parsley.

For the hake

To make the freeze-dried powder (a pinch), rapidly sauté 100 g of hake meat with a drop of oil and insert into the freeze drier; it will take about 40 hours to dehydrate. Once dry, grind to powder.

Add the freeze-dried hake powder to the hake, coat with the white clay sauce and cook a la plancha. Set aside.

For the white clay paint

Lightly fry the almonds and pine nuts in a pan with oil until golden. Then add the sugar, coconut and the Martini. Sauté and moisten with the fish fumet. Reduce to half and add the clay. Blend together and season with salt and pepper.

For the green sauce and veal cheek salsa

Mix the green sauce with the stewed veal cheek sauce. Bring to a light boil and cut the sauce with the olive oil. Add salt and pepper.

For the clay curd

Peel the garlic and brown in oil. Add the Zopako bread, sliced and toasted. Cover with water and cook 45 minutes. Set aside.

Clean the vegetables, cut finely and gently sauté with a little oil, but do not allow to colour. Set aside. Lightly brown the almonds and pine nuts in a pan with oil. Then add the sugar, coconut, and the Martini. Soften until slightly reduced and moisten with the fumet. Bring to a boil and add the clay. Blend together. Boil all the ingredients and add the agar agar (1 g for each 100 g). Add a pinch of salt and pepper. Once cool, cut the dough into cubes.

For the discoloured parsley

Leave the parsley leaves covered in alcohol for three hours until the spirit evaporates. The leaves will be pale, discoloured and crispy.

Draw a perfect square with the white clay paint on a dinner plate and place the hake on it. To its side place the clay curd and sink the discoloured parsley leaves into it. Drizzle the hake with the green sauce and veal cheek juice.

 

 

Clay bonbon

 

ingredients

 

4 people

For the truffle

250 g chocolate 70% cocoa

100 g cream 35% fat

50 g whole milk

1 g tandoori masala powder

For the Rooibos infusion

2 g Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis)

130 g water

For the clay

100 g Rooibos tea infusion

30 g white clay

4 g chopped parsley

 

 

method

 

For the truffle

Chop the chocolate. Set aside.

Boil the milk with the cream for 30 seconds. Pour the mixture over the chocolate, little by little, until you get an homogeneous mixture. Add the tandoori powder. Leave to cool in small semi spherical moulds for at least 6 hours. Join the spherical halves, applying heat, to achieve perfect spheres. Allow to cool. Thread onto separate skewers and set aside.

For the rooibos infusion

Boil the water and add the Rooibos off the heat. Leave to infuse for three minutes and strain. Leave to cool and reserve.

For the clay

Cold mix the ingredients to make a thick dough.

Dip the spheres into the clay, covering them with a thin layer. Dry with cold air until the clay hardens. Store in the refrigerator. They are served on a marble base.

 

 

Always in fashion

 

Llibre de el Sent Soví – a 14th century work written in Catalan by an anonymous cook to the King of England – mentions rice (Oryza sativa) as an ingredient in Menjar blanc (Blancmange). An emulsion of almonds with rice, a kind of porridge, to which were added the broth and meat of chickens or capons, relating it to the Navarre Christmas canas (white hair) soup. It isn’t until the 15th century, in Nola Ruperto’s El libre del Coch where two formulas for stewed rice appear, that can be considered antecedents to the multiple stewed rice dishes that would arise in later centuries – especially for the Eastern Spanish – who naturally included them in their cuisine. They were rice with beef broth and rice baked in the oven. The latter is made in the oven with egg yolks and a crust, very similar to its ‘great-grandson’, arros rossejat, toasted rice, or rice with a crust, so popular today in Valencia . . .

 

 

Today, it is not only the quality of rice that is important, we also pay attention to the area of the produce or to the characteristics of the grain (long, short, brown, etc) for, as is the case with the fashion for varietal wines, little by little, deep reflection is being imposed on the varieties of rice suitable for each type of preparation. Thus, the same rice is not used for a paella or a dry baked dish as it is for a soupy rice in a pot. Or a risotto or a cooked rice garnish, for which we would choose long-grain American rice, called Thaibonnet in Europe. Not to mention an oriental type of dish, in which case we always go for an aromatic basmati, or a rice with Thai jasmine perfume, or even a sticky or glutinous Japanese rice. The crux of the matter lies in choosing the most suitable variety

for each dish. The Italians, who know a bit about this, specify the type of rice used in all their recipes. With some, especially large stock preparations, they use the variety called arborio, of larger grain, while most of the great Italian creamy rice dishes are prepared with carnaroli, the most elegant and also more expensive Italian rice, or with the smaller but very effective vialone nano.

In our case we have used rice to create something as much in vogue as the crunch in a snack, combined with black beans (which look like coffee beans), traditionally called Moors and Christians in Central America and the Caribbean, but in a very modern, and acclaimed, version.

 

 

Rice crackers and ‘coffee’

 

ingredients

 

4 people

For the rice purée

200 g rice

600 g water

For the crackers

400 g cooked and mashed black beans

200 g broth from the beans

700 g rice purée

salt

pepper

For the coffee powder

100 g icing sugar

4 g freeze-dried coffee

In addition

cooked whole beans

bacon slices

oil for frying

 

 

method

 

For the rice purée

Cook over a low heat for 30 minutes. Mash it all but do not strain it.

For the crackers

Cook the black beans in abundant salted water; separate, on the one hand, the beans and, on the other hand, their cooking broth. Weigh the beans and the broth and blend thoroughly with the rice puree.

Roll out the dough on greaseproof paper and cut into rounds about 7 cm in diameter. Place some strips of bacon on the top of each of them with a few cooked beans, which will be like coffee beans. Leave to dry for 24 hours at 50°C.

For the coffee powder

Cold mix the ingredients. Set aside.

Fry the crackers in abundant oil, place them on trays and sprinkle with the coffee powder.

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NAMED BEST BOOK ABOUT FOOD 2015 BY BOOKSABOUTFOOD.COM

Juan Mari Arzak is the owner and chef of Arzak restaurant in San Sebastian, Spain, and was one of the first Spanish chefs to be awarded 3 Michelin stars. The restaurant is now rated 8th best in the world, and Juan’s daughter Elena, who cooks with him, was voted best female chef in the world in 2012. They both studied with the great chefs of their day – Juan in France with Paul Bocuse and the Troisgros brothers; Elena with Alain Ducasse, Ferran Adrìa and Pierre Gagnaire. ‘What we eat, how we eat, is in our culture,’ says Elena, ‘our signature cuisine is Basque. Our taste is from here. We were born here. We cook unconsciously with this identity.’ Thus Arzak is considered to be one of the most influential masters of the New Basque cuisine, which has continued to have a major influence on international cuisine, particularly on such world renowned chefs as Ferran Adrià, who took the techniques pioneered by Arzak to new heights.

Originally published in Spanish and now available in English for the first time Arzak Secrets is THE behind the scenes recipe and technique book from the world famed restaurant. Gorgeously photographed, this volume is a glimpse at some of the secrets behind the dishes that have made the restaurant and chef famous. Arzak’s kitchen is a laboratory for flavors, aromas and textures, and his dishes and techniques are revealed in this fascinating cookbook, which is not only for professionals looking for inspiration but for any dedicated cook committed to understanding the creative development and innovations behind this exceptional food.

Review

“Foie gras totem with love-in-a-mist is now at your fingertips. Arzak’s science-geeky tome on the modernist Basque cooking he pioneered at his legendary San Sebastián restaurant is finally available in English. Weekend project, check” (The Tasting Table)”*Best Books About Cooking 2015* Originally published in Spanish and now available in English for the first time Arzak Secrets is THE behind the scenes recipe and technique book from the world famed restaurant. Gorgeously photographed, this volume is a glimpse at some of the secrets behind the dishes that have made the restaurant and chef famous.” (Books About Food)

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muy bueno el libro Lo recomiendo

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