Chicken and Other Poultry by James Peterson [google pdf books]


  • Full Title : Chicken and Other Poultry: James Peterson’s Kitchen Education: Recipes and Techniques from Cooking
  • Autor: James Peterson
  • Print Length: 278 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press
  • Publication Date: April 10, 2012
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: B006LT2DZY
  • ISBN-13: 
  • Download File Format: epub

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Celebrated chef, teacher, and cookbook author James Peterson presents more than thirty recipes for chicken, turkey, duck, squab, and quail from Cooking, his classic guide for home cooks. Featuring delicious and approachable recipes for all manner of poultry and birds, such as Moroccan Chicken Tagine, Provençal Chicken, classic Roast Turkey, Duck Confit, and more, Peterson teaches the finer points of cooking to produce consistently excellent results. He also includes an array of helpful step-by-step photographs to help you master the techniques and build confidence in the kitchen.

In addition to the wonderful and diverse recipes, Peterson provides a true kitchen education, with sections on the ten basic cooking methods, techniques all cooks should know, cooking terms, and recommended ingredients and kitchen tools. This e-book exclusive is an enriching addition to anyone’s digital library, and cooks both new and experienced will appreciate Peterson’s relaxed, unfussy style that encourages them to learn, keep it simple, and have fun in the kitchen.

Be sure to check out more e-book exclusives from James Peterson’s Kitchen Education series.

 

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arcoal lighter (see this page). It’s a great gadget; the coals are ready in no time. Just point it at the charcoal, press the button, and they will ignite. Another easy and reliable method is to use a chimney starter, which most barbecue stores should have. Fill the top with charcoal, then place scrunched-up newspaper in the bottom. Place on the grill grate and use a long wooden match to light the newspaper. The coals will burn and start to develop a thick white ash in about 20 to 30 minutes. Turn out the coals into the grill and reposition the grate.

If you are creating a two-zone fire for indirect grilling, spread the charcoal evenly over half of the bottom of the grill. If you are building a fire for direct grilling, it’s still a good idea to leave at least a small space where there are no charcoals so that you have an “out.”

Make sure the charcoal is well lit—covered in white ash—before you start cooking. And make sure the grate is nice and hot.

DIRECT OR INDIRECT GRILLING?

Grilling food over direct heat is quick and easy. It’s perfect for burgers, thin steaks and pieces of chicken or fish, and also for vegetables and kebabs.

Indirect heat is the way to go for everything else. It’s best for larger and/or tougher cuts of meat that require one to three hours of slow, gentle cooking: think of ribs, a whole chicken, a leg of lamb—all succulent, tender, juicy. I also use indirect grilling when I want to create a nice sear on a piece of meat before cooking it over even heat. (This also works for delicate items that could benefit from char marks and gentle cooking.)

DIRECT GRILLING

For direct grilling, I have a clear idea of the perfect temperature. Technically, it’s 400°F (200°C), which you could call medium-high, but which I call the Five-Steamboat Rule. Hold your hand a few inches above the grill grate and quickly count “one steamboat, two steamboats, three steamboats . . .” If you can’t get to five steamboats, your grill is too hot!

With gas grills, make sure you preheat the barbecue for at least 15 minutes before you check the heat. For a charcoal grill, the coals should be bright orange and covered with a light layer of ash.

INDIRECT GRILLING—OR HOW TO BUILD A TWO-ZONE FIRE

With a two-zone fire, you have a hot zone and a cool zone. A one-zone fire (in a charcoal grill this means the coals are arranged evenly over the bottom of the grill) is the reason why most people end up burning their food when grilling larger cuts.

For a charcoal grill, spread the charcoal evenly over half of the bottom of the grill. Keep an eye on the thermometer until it’s the correct temperature (as directed in the recipe). For a gas grill, preheat the barbecue for about 15 minutes, then adjust one side or section to the desired heat and turn off the other side completely. This will be the indirect heat area. Keep the lid covered during the cooking time.

USING A DRIP PAN: When you are indirectly grilling a large cut of meat that contains a lot of fat, using a drip pan or tray is a real lifesaver—you don’t want the fat to drip down, flare up and create the wrong kind of smoke. I use disposable baking pans made of foil. Place the pan underneath the grates where your cool zone will be. Fill the pan three-quarters full with water—to which you may add some of your favorite beer, wine or spirit for a really great aromatic steaming effect!

USING WOOD CHIPS: Wood chips are great for adding a smoky flavor. I use a combination of wet (soaked) and dry wood chips. (An entire packet of wet chips would burn too slowly, and a packet of dry chips would burst into flames.) If you are using a foil pouch instead of a smoker box, poke holes all over it—the more holes, the more smoke.

Lay the packet on the hot side of the grill. Wait until you see smoke enveloping the cabin. When you’re ready to barbecue, be prepared to work quickly. You don’t want the lid off the barbecue for too long.

RAINFORD BARBECUE TIPS

Always make sure your grates are clean. Brush the grates well with a barbecue wire brush before and after cooking, while the grates are hot.

Bring meat to room temperature before grilling so that it cooks evenly.

Use an oven thermometer if your barbecue doesn’t have one built in.

Always prep your cooking grates with vegetable oil before putting any food on to them (I use canola). I dip paper towels or a cloth into the oil and quickly wipe down the grates. Or I spray the grates with an atomizer filled with oil and wipe them down with a paper towel/cloth. This is a very important step when you’re cooking items like burgers and chicken pieces or searing a large piece of meat—you don’t want the meat to stick to the grill!

Always let meat rest and relax before serving, even burgers. Tent with foil and leave it for at least 10 minutes.

A NOTE ON THE RECIPES

Most of the recipes in this book are for eight people, but of course you can halve or double the recipes, depending on how many guests you’re grilling for. And feel free to make the portion sizes smaller—for example, a 6 oz (180g) instead of 8 oz (250 g) piece of fish.

If you see an ingredient in a recipe that you don’t like, don’t be afraid to make substitutions. Also, you don’t have to cook the complete menu all at once; my recipes are designed to be mixed and matched. You should adapt my recipes and make them your own!

TRICKS OF THE TRADE

KEY RAINFORD BARBECUE TOOLS

BARBECUE TONGS

Long barbecue tongs give good distance between you and the grill.

WIRE BRUSH

A wire brush will help you keep the grill free of debris. It’s important to keep your grill clean at all times.

SYRINGE (FLAVOR INJECTOR)

A kitchen syringe will allow you to place flavors directly into the meat or chicken you’re cooking. Just think about your favorite flavors being more pronounced in every bite.

SMOKER BOX OR FOIL POUCHES

The wood flavor in your food will give that barbecue taste you’ve come to expect. Try different types of wood like elder, pear, maple, mesquite or hickory. You can buy them in different sizes from chips to chunks. The size of wood depends on the length of the grilling process.

STAINLESS STEEL GRIDDLE

This is a great accessory to add to your barbecue, because it adds the element of a flat top. Just think about the pancakes, bacon and eggs you’ll be able to cook!

THE LOOFTLIGHTER CHARCOAL LIGHTER

This tool was designed by a friend of mine from Sweden, Richard Looft. It’s a hand-held device that gets your coals glowing in minutes. The lighter doesn’t shoot flames, but heats a blown air stream to 1250°F (676°C). It heats coals in 20 minutes, and is available in most barbecue stores.

MEAT THERMOMETER

These 3-second reading thermometers are widely available. The readings are accurate to approximately 0.7°F, and they usually have a water-resistant design.

RAINFORD’S STAPLE RECIPES

CHICKEN STOCK

The most economical way to buy chicken parts is to buy a whole chicken and dismantle it yourself. Keep the rest of the carcass and store it in a resealable plastic bag in the freezer until you have three, then make this from-scratch stock.

3 chicken carcasses, about 1 lb (500 g) each

8 cups (2 L) cold water

1 onion, coarsely chopped

1 rib celery, coarsely chopped

½ large carrot, coarsely chopped

8 parsley stems

3 sprigs of fresh thyme

2 bay leaves

½ tsp (2 mL) whole black peppercorns

THE RAINFORD METHOD

1. Break apart chicken carcasses and put in a large stock pot. If you can’t find chicken carcasses, you can also buy 3 lb (1.5 kg) of chicken bones.

2. Add cold water to the bones, and bring to a boil. Once boiling, skim the surface with a spoon until all the visible fat is gone.

3. Add onion, celery, carrot, parsley, thyme, bay leaves and peppercorns to the pot.

4. Simmer for 1 hour and strain.

Makes 6 cups (1.5 L)

Tip: Don’t sweat it if you don’t have the time or inclination to make my chicken stock. All the recipes in the book will work just fine with stock from the store.

JERK MARINADE

¾ cup (185 mL) white vinegar

½ cup (125 mL) orange juice

¼ cup (60 mL) olive oil

¼ cup (60 mL) soy sauce

1 lime, juiced

2 Tbsp (30 mL) garlic powder

1 Tbsp (15 mL) dried thyme leaves

1 Tbsp (15 mL) ground allspice

1 ½ tsp (7.5 mL) dried red chili flakes

1 ½ tsp (7.5 mL) dried ground sage

1 ½ tsp (7.5 mL) freshly ground black pepper

1 tsp (5 mL) kosher salt

¾ tsp (4 mL) ground cinnamon

¾ tsp (4 mL) ground nutmeg

1 cup (250 mL) chopped onion

3 green onions, finely chopped

1 Scotch bonnet chili, seeded and chopped

THE RAINFORD METHOD

Blend all ingredients together in a food processor until smooth.

Makes 1 ¾ cups (450 mL)

RAINFORD’S BARBECUE SAUCE

¾ cups (185 mL) apple juice

½ cups (125 mL) ketchup

3 Tbsp (45 mL) cider vinegar

2 tsp (10 mL) soy sauce

1 tsp (5 mL) Worcestershire sauce

1 tsp (5 mL) molasses

½ tsp (2 mL) chili powder

½ tsp (2 mL) garlic powder

¼ tsp (1 mL) freshly ground black pepper

THE RAINFORD METHOD

Combine the apple juice, ketchup, vinegar, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, molasses, chili powder, garlic and pepper in a small saucepan set over medium heat. Simmer for 20 minutes or until thickened, then remove from heat.

Makes 1 cup or 250 mL

Feel free to double or triple the ingredients in this sauce, depending on how much you need.

RAINFORD’S GRILLING TEMPERATURE CHART

BEEF STEAKS

Rare 125–130ºF 52–54ºC

Medium-Rare 130–140ºF 54–60ºC

Medium 140–150ºF 60–65ºC

Medium-Well 155–165ºF 68–74ºC

BONE-IN BEEF ROASTS

Rare 125–130ºF 52–54ºC

Medium-Rare 130–140ºF 54–60ºC

Medium 140–150ºF 60–65ºC

Medium-Well 155–165ºF 68–74ºC

BONELESS, ROLLED BEEF ROASTS*

Rare not recommended

Medium-Rare not recommended

Medium not recommended

Medium-Well not recommended

Well done 170ºF 76ºC

RACK OF LAMB

Rare 125–130ºF 52–54ºC

Medium-Rare 130–140ºF 54–60ºC

Medium 140–150ºF 60–65ºC

Medium-Well 155–165ºF 68–74ºC

LAMB CHOPS

Rare 125–130ºF 52–54ºC

Medium-Rare 130–140ºF 54–60ºC

Medium 140–150ºF 60–65ºC

Medium-Well 155–165ºF 68–74ºC

PORK CHOPS

Rare not recommended

Medium-Rare not recommended

Medium not recommended

Medium-Well 155–165ºF 68–74ºC

Well Done 175–185ºF 80–85ºC

VEAL RACKS

Rare 125–130ºF 52–54ºC

Medium-Rare 130–140ºF 54–60ºC

Medium 140–150ºF 60–65ºC

Medium-Well 155–165ºF 68–74ºC

VEAL CHOPS

Rare 125–130ºF 52–54ºC

Medium-Rare 130–140ºF 54–60ºC

Medium 140–150ºF 60–65ºC

Medium-Well 155–165ºF 68–74ºC

WHOLE CHICKEN 170–175ºF 76–80ºC

CHICKEN PIECES 170–175ºF 76–80ºC

WHOLE TURKEY 170–180ºF 76–82ºC

BURGERS 160ºF 71ºC

RAINFORD FISH GRILLING TIPS

WHOLE FISH, FISH FILLETS AND STEAKS

Fish is done when the flesh flakes easily with a fork. Also look for an opaque appearance all the way through. If you’re unsure, an internal temperature of 155°F (68°C) is recommended.

SHRIMP AND LOBSTER TAILS

Flesh is fully cooked when it turns opaque and firm. Be careful to avoid overcooking shrimp or lobster.

* For boneless, rolled beef roasts, an internal temperature of 170°F (76°C) is recommended because surface bacteria may have been rolled into the center of the roast.

A TASTE OF NORTH AFRICA

THIS FIRST MENU was pulled together over a few beers with my really good friend chef Samir Hanna. We were sitting on my back deck and I was telling him that I’d like to start my book with a tribute to him.

Samir has helped me immensely in my kitchen life. I thought back to all the meals we cooked together at one of the restaurants we worked at. The dishes we had to prepare for the customers had none of the ethnic flare of the meals Samir and I would cook for each other and for our staff.

Now that I’ve started this journey of cooking and grilling my way, I am determined to begin this cookbook with the kind of food Samir and I both love.

Egyptian LAMB KOFTAS

Cinnamon-Scented TOMATO-JASMINE RICE

FRESH TOMATO SALAD with Grilled Red Onion

TAHINI SAUCE with Lemon

Yogurt-Garlic CUCUMBER DIP

EGYPTIAN LAMB KOFTAS

Koftas are like North-African-spiced mini burgers on skewers. They’re very delicate, so be sure to sear them well before turning to prevent them from sticking to the grate.

¾ lb (375 g) ground lamb

¼ lb (125 g) ground beef

1 large onion, finely grated

¼ cup (60 mL) finely chopped fresh parsley

1 egg

1 Tbsp (15 mL) extra virgin olive oil

2 cloves garlic, finely grated

1 Tbsp (15 mL) ground allspice

1½ tsp (7.5 mL) kosher salt

2 tsp (10 mL) freshly cracked black pepper

Canola oil for greasing

THE RAINFORD METHOD

1. Mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl until well combined.

2. Place mixture in a resealable plastic bag and refrigerate for 24 hours.

3. Take the mixture out of the bag and form into eight even-size portions, shaped like mini footballs (as in American football, not soccer). Run a skewer widthwise through each kofta.

4. Preheat the grill to medium-high (if you are using charcoal, heat the coals until a thick white ash develops). Oil the grate with canola oil.

5. Place the koftas on the hot grill. Make sure to sear them well before you try to turn them, and turn carefully or they will break apart.

6. Grill the koftas until a meat thermometer registers an internal temperature of 150 to 160°F (65 to 71°C).

7. Remove from skewers and serve in pita bread.

Makes 8 servings

CINNAMON-SCENTED

TOMATO-JASMINE RICE

One of the chefs I worked with in Asia showed me a great trick that I call “the old knuckle test.” Add the rice to a rice cooker, then place your middle finger on top of the rice and pour in enough liquid to come to the first joint of your finger. Works every time.

1½ cups (375 mL) jasmine rice

1 cup (250 mL) tomato passata

¾ cup (185 mL) water

1 tsp (5 mL) kosher salt

1 cinnamon stick

2 plum tomatoes (fresh or canned), seeded and diced

THE RAINFORD METHOD

1. Rinse the rice under cold running water, moving the rice around with your fingers. Continue rinsing until the water runs clear with no white milkiness. Drain the rice well.

2. Place the rice in the rice cooker and add tomato passata, water, salt and cinnamon stick.

3. Cook according to the instructions and, when the button pops, remove the lid and fluff the rice. Fluffing the rice simply means using a dinner fork to loosen all the grains of rice. Remove the cinnamon stick and fold in the chopped tomatoes.

Makes 6 servings

Tip: I like to use a rice cooker. It just makes it a lot easier as it takes the small chance of messing up out of the equation: when the button pops it’s done. A rice cooker steams the rice, so no peeking. If you don’t have a rice cooker, please use your favorite traditional method.

FRESH TOMATO SALAD

with GRILLED RED ONION

I had some leftover Champagne (as you do) so I added it to the vinaigrette and it was fabulous. If you have no bubbly lying around, Champagne or white wine vinegar are good too. For best flavor, chop the tarragon at the last minute.

1 red onion, sliced into 1-inch (2.5 cm) rings

6 plum tomatoes

2 Tbsp (30 mL) canola oil

Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste

Vinaigrette

¼ cup (60 mL) olive oil

¼ cup (60 mL) cider vinegar

¼ cup (60 mL) Champagne

3 Tbsp (45 mL) finely chopped fresh tarragon

1 tsp (5 mL) Dijon mustard

Kosher salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste

THE RAINFORD METHOD

1. Two hours before grilling, whisk the vinaigrette ingredients together in a bowl and add onion rings, tossing to coat. Marinate at room temperature.

2. Fire up your charcoal or preheat your gas grill. Grilling temp should be around 325 to 350°F (160 to 180°C). Prep the grill for cooking over direct heat.

3. Core the tomatoes then cut them lengthwise into quarters. You want large, chunky pieces for this rustic grilled salad.

4. Remove the onion rings from the vinaigrette, reserving the vinaigrette. Brush the onion rings lightly with a little canola oil and season them with salt and black pepper.

5. Place the onion rings on the grill and cook until lightly charred, 6 to 10 minutes per side on medium-high heat.

6. Remove onion rings from the grill and set aside to cool slightly. Whisk the vinaigrette until nice and thick.

7. To assemble the salad, combine the tomatoes, cooled onion rings and vinaigrette in a bowl and you’re done.

Makes 6 to 8 servings

Tip: Canola oil has a higher smoke point than say, olive oil, so brushing the onion rings with canola before grilling them will prevent the onions burning. Serve this salad buffet-style or in individual salad bowls.

TAHINI SAUCE

with LEMON

Buy your favorite brand of tahini for this flavorful sauce. Any leftovers will keep in the fridge for about 1 week.

¼ cup (60 mL) vegetable stock

½ cup (125 mL) tahini

2 cloves garlic, finely grated

1 Tbsp (15 mL) red wine vinegar

2 tsp (10 mL) fresh lemon juice

1 tsp (5 mL) ground cumin

½ tsp (2 mL) kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

THE RAINFORD METHOD

1. Stir the vegetable stock into the tahini to thin it out.

2. Stir in the garlic, vinegar, lemon juice, cumin, salt and pepper until blended.

3. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

YOGURT-GARLIC

CUCUMBER DIP

1 ¼ cups (310 mL) seeded and finely diced English cucumber

1 tsp (5 mL) kosher salt

2 cups (500 mL) whole-milk yogurt

2 Tbsp (30 mL) finely chopped fresh mint

1 Tbsp (15 mL) olive oil

1 Tbsp (15 mL) fresh lemon juice

2 cloves garlic, finely grated

¼ tsp (1 mL) freshly ground black pepper

THE RAINFORD METHOD

1. Place the diced cucumber in a colander and sprinkle with ¾ tsp (4 mL) salt. Toss very well and let drain in the sink for 30 minutes.

2. While the cucumber drains, spoon the yogurt into another colander lined with a coffee filter and let stand for 15 minutes.

3. When cucumber has drained for 30 minutes, grab a few layers of paper towel, place the cucumber in the middle of the layers and press down lightly to draw out as much excess moisture as possible from the cucumber.

4. In a bowl, stir together the strained yogurt, cucumber, mint, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, pepper and remaining salt.

5. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

MORE FLAVORS FROM AFRICA

ON ONE OF MY FIRST days at culinary school, I met a fellow student who helped me get my first paying job in the 90s at a Middle Eastern restaurant. Some of the staples in the restaurant kitchen were lamb, couscous and zucchini.

On one of the slower nights I was inspired to play in the kitchen and this menu was the result. Putting this menu together when I was writing the book sent me down memory lane and reminded me of leaving school and heading to that restaurant all those years ago.

Grilled LEG OF LAMB

Grilled MIDDLE-EASTERN PATTIES

Stuffed ZUCCHINI BOATS

Herbed COUSCOUS WITH TOMATOES and PINE NUTS

LEMON-LOVE MARTINI

GRILLED LEG OF LAMB

This one’s for my friend George Karamitos the Greek Golfer. I serve the lamb with stuffed zucchini and couscous but it also pairs well with a fresh tomato salad or rice; the options are endless, really!

⅔ cup (160 mL) Greek or other white wine

⅓ cup (80 mL) Greek or extra virgin olive oil

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