Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives: The Funky Finds in Flavortown: America’s Classic Joints and Killer Comfort Food by Guy Fieri, EPUB, 0062244655

July 15, 2017

 Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives: The Funky Finds in Flavortown: America's Classic Joints and Killer Comfort Food by Guy Fieri, EPUB, 0062244655

Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives: The Funky Finds in Flavortown: America’s Classic Joints and Killer Comfort Food by Guy Fieri

  • Print Length: 320 Pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Cookbooks
  • Publication Date: May 14, 2013
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009NQZZNO
  • ISBN-10: 0062244655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062244659
  • File Format: EPUB

 

”Preview”

CONTENTS

 

Dedication

Flavortown, U.S.A., Map

Introduction

The Krew

 

NORTHEAST AND MID-ATLANTIC

Rino’s Place, East Boston, Massachusetts

Broadway Diner, Baltimore, Maryland

Sip & Bite Restaurant, Baltimore, Maryland

Rincon Criollo, Corona, Queens, New York

John’s of 12th Street, New York, New York

Crazy Burger Café & Juice Bar, Narragansett, Rhode Island

 

SOUTH

Sonny’s Famous Steak Hogies, Hollywood, Florida

The Whale’s Rib Restaurant, Deerfield Beach, Florida

Tap Tap Haitian Restaurant, Miami Beach, Florida

Culhane’s Irish Pub, Atlantic Beach, Florida

Virgil’s Café, Bellevue, Kentucky

Surrey’s Café and Juice Bar, New Orleans, Louisiana

Mahony’s Po-Boy Shop, New Orleans, Louisiana

Louie and the Redhead Lady, Mandeville, Louisiana

The Glass Onion, Charleston, South Carolina

Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint, Nolensville, Tennessee

 

MIDWEST

Tre Kronor, Chicago, Illinois

Taste of Peru, Chicago, Illinois

Irazu, Chicago, Illinois

Big & Little’s, Chicago, Illinois

3 Sisters Café, Indianapolis, Indiana

Zydeco’s, Mooresville, Indiana

Union Woodshop, Clarkston, Michigan

Casper’s & Runyon’s Nook, St. Paul, Minnesota

Nye’s Polonaise Room, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Pizzeria Lola, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Smack Shack at the 1029 Bar, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Grinder’s Pizza, Kansas City, Missouri

Big Mama’s Kitchen and Catering, Omaha, Nebraska

Melt Bar and Grilled, Lakewood, Ohio

Momocho, Cleveland, Ohio

 

WEST AND SOUTHWEST

Roberto’s Authentic Mexican Food, Anthem, Arizona

Jamie’s Broadway Grille, Sacramento, California

Café Rolle, Sacramento, California

Bubba’s Fine Diner, San Anselmo, California

Sol Food, San Rafael, California

Rocco’s Café, San Francisco, California

Fab Hot Dogs, Reseda, California

La Texanita, Santa Rosa, California

Mambo’s, Glendale, California

Aldo’s Harbor Restaurant, Santa Cruz, California

Pier 23 Café, San Francisco, California

North End Caffe, Manhattan Beach, California

Café Citti, Kenwood, California

Schellville Grill, Sonoma, California

Paul’s Coffee Shop, Fountain Valley, California

Mama Cozza’s, Anaheim, California

Catelli’s, Geyserville, California

Mac’s Fish and Chip Shop, Santa Barbara, California

Tioli’s Crazee Burger, San Diego, California

Lauer-Krauts, Brighton, Colorado

Tocabe: An American Indian Eatery, Denver, Colorado

Bar Gernika, Boise, Idaho

Westside Drive In, Boise, Idaho

Standard Diner, Albuquerque, New Mexico

The Coffee Cup, Boulder City, Nevada

Forte European Tapas Bar & Bistro, Las Vegas, Nevada

Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Otto’s Sausage Kitchen, Portland, Oregon

Bunk Sandwiches, Portland, Oregon

Pok Pok, Portland, Oregon

Noble Pig Sandwiches, Austin, Texas

 

HAWAII

Rainbow Drive-In, Honolulu, Hawaii

 

CANADA

Fresh Local Wild, Vancouver, British Columbia

Tomahawk Restaurant, North Vancouver, British Columbia

The Red Wagon Café, Vancouver, British Columbia

Meat & Bread, Vancouver, British Columbia

 

Acknowledgments

Recipe Index

List of Restaurants

About the Author

Also by Guy Fieri

Credits

Copyright

About the Publisher

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

As I sit down to write the kickoff to this third installment of what’s become the Diners, Drive Ins and Dives series of books, I can’t help but smile at what’s become of this little-show-that-could. The Krew and I are braving the cold in Toronto, Canada (yes, that makes DDD an international show!), and while I’m writing about book three, I’m hitting some amazing joints that I already know you’re going to dig in book four.

So far, the train to Flavortown has hit more than six hundred restaurants, celebrating what’s great about the great American culinary landscape (and beyond), and as the reach of the show has grown, so has the DDD family, from the Krew to the fans to the owners and chefs. As I look back, it really feels like we’ve all grown together, and it truly has been a life-changing experience. I can think back to Season 1 and how little my then ten-year-old son, Hunter, was when he’d hitch a ride with me in the Camaro. Well, now I’m fighting him for the keys . . . he’s driving! I remember specific days when great, lasting friendships were formed on the road with crew members like Chico and the Big Bunny, DDD legends like Gorilla, Panini Pete, Stretch, Hodad, Niko and Sikey, Reno . . . the list goes on and on. DDD has brought a lot of great people together in ways I never could have imagined.

 

COURTESY OF TELEVISION FOOD NETWORK, G.P.

LIVE CAM: YA SEE, FIERI, YOU’RE IN MY TOWN, SO I GET TO DRIVE YOUR CAR! IF I WAS IN NOR CAL, YOU COULD CRUISE MY VESPA!

And what makes it all the more fulfilling, real, and important is how you guys—the fans—have come along with us for the ride. You’ve watched the show grow. You’ve engaged in our culinary shenanigans. You’ve hit these funky joints, tried their food, and supported their great work. That’s what makes the culinary world go ’round. Together we’ve created our own food culture. We’ve supported local businesses, and believe me, it’s made a huge difference in many, many lives. We’ve done our part to preserve the great culinary traditions of many different kinds of folks and learned a lot along the way. And we’ve connected with each other in new ways through the great common denominator: food. I feel very fortunate that I get to meet all sorts of great people around the world who dig talkin’ DDD—at my restaurants, on the street, on the air, and I’ve got to tell you, it makes all of the miles and long hours well worth it.

 

TRYING A PIG EAR SANDWICH—IF I DON’T LIKE THIS, SHE MAY KICK MY BUTT.

DDD is about celebrating the good in food. We don’t review food. We root for it. I get asked over and over, “Is there anything you won’t eat? Is there anything you don’t like? Do you just automatically give everything a thumbs up?” Of course I don’t love everything. Of course there are all sorts of things on any given menu that I wouldn’t order. But that’s not what we’re all about. We’re here to show you what you might want to eat out there—not what you shouldn’t! Food is fun. Or at least we think it is.

So, as we continue on the road/ship/train to Flavortown in America and beyond, let’s take a minute to enjoy the latest batch of greatest DDD hits, right here, right now, in DDD3: The Funky Finds in Flavortown. You’re gonna dig our first native American restaurant, Tocabe: An American Indian Eatery, in Denver, and for one of our first international entries, check out Fresh Local Wild from Vancouver.

So, before we get to cookin’, I’ve got to thank all of the ever-growing DDD family for comin’ along for the ride. It’s an honor to continue to be a part of your lives . . . to laugh together, to eat together, and to celebrate all that’s great about food and the people who make it. Keep on cookin’.

Love, Peace & Taco Grease,

 

 

THE KREW

 

I appreciate all of the accolades that I get from the fans about Triple D, but I have to remind everybody to recognize the importance of a great offensive line to a quarterback, and that comes down to the Krew. They deserve a lot of credit. They arrive on location well before me and continue to work as I go on to the next location. The researchers, the drivers, the PAs, the audio, the directors of photography, producers, all of them deserve a big round of applause for a job well done. And as you’ll see throughout the book, I’ve asked them for their insights into the funky joints in Flavortown. So be prepared, some of this may get weird.

Let me introduce the Krew:

 

 

KAT HIGGINS

 

 

Executive Producer

Started: Season 1

Kat doesn’t have an official nickname. I like to call her “Mandu” as in Kathmandu, but she really is the Mama Bear, sometimes on the road with us, sometimes back at the nest (or den). I pick the cities, she starts research, we do the evaluation of the locations, and she solidifies the details, handles all the issues, keeps an eye on everything in the field, sets the tempo, and puts the show on the road. So maybe her nickname should be “Mama Bear” . . . but I know that ain’t gonna stick, so we’re still searching.

 

 

ANTHONY “CHICO” RODRIGUEZ

 

 

Director of Photography

Started: Pilot

Chico was the original director of photography and a founding member of the show. With his last name being Rodriguez, somehow the Freddy Prinze show came up in discussion and he got the name Chico and the Man. He’s the proud father of two and lives in Minneapolis with his effervescent wife and their daughters, Ava and Vivian.

Chico: Guy’s manager, Reid, has recently called in a favor to see if there can be a change of time to add more hours in the day and days in the year, because he works 28/8 but somehow squeezes it into 24/7. Reid also travels around with Guy and is with us on DDD shoots. So Bunny and I have taken it upon ourselves, much to the head shaking (and laughing) of our producers, to build “mobile offices” for Reid. The man has to work, and well . . . Bunny and I want to create a great work environment for him.

 

 

DAVID “BIG BUNNY” CANADA

 

 

Audio Tech

Started: Pilot

An original founding member of the show, David is an all-round utility player. He can fix it, build it, wire it, arrange it, cool it, heat it—you name it, “Big Bunny Can Do It.” The reason he’s called Big Bunny is that he’s tall and when he puts the headphones up on his head they look like rabbit ears. He’s also married to one of our favorite producers, Kate Gibson, who is now Kate Canada. They met on the show while filming at Mike’s Chili Parlor in Seattle, Washington.

 

 

MIKE “FATHER TIME” MORRIS

 

 

Field Producer

Started: Season 1

You might recognize my ATO fraternity brother Mike from the movie Maid in Manhattan with Jennifer Lopez and Ralph Fiennes, in which he played a New York news reporter. Father Time always brings wisdom and jocularity to the set.

Father Time: The owners of the places are so nice, but we’re there for days, disrupting their routines and changing what they do while we’re there. They have wireless microphones on and don’t realize we can hear them thorough our headphones. Our sound guys alert us if there’s any concern. So the owners probably wonder what’s going on when after they’ve been back in the cooler talking to their help in private and say that they’re exhausted or not used to being told what to do or whatever, and I somehow know to come talk to them and say, “Look, I know you’re exhausted and not used to being told what to do.”

They must think we’re mind readers. It helps to have insider information!

 

 

BRYNA “THE PIRATE” LEVIN

 

 

Field Producer

Started: Season 1

As I’ve mentioned before, Bryna likes big sunhats and she wears stripes all the time. The Pirate is probably one of the smartest people on the Krew. She’s not only a producer but also a writer, does research for the show, and is a proud mother of two boys.

 

 

KATE “ASK KATE” GIBSON AKA “MRS. BUNNY”

 

 

Field Producer

Started: Seasons 2 to 5, then back for 13

Kate has never been officially given a name. After she married David we tried out Mrs. Bunny, but that didn’t stick. She’s been called Ask Kate because before you did anything you had to get her permission as a producer. She doesn’t like the name, so we’re taking suggestions. Kate is funny, opinionated, and hard-working—and that’s what we love about her.

 

 

LIZ “ERD” POLLOCK

 

 

Field Producer

Started: Season 8

Liz is a fun-loving, always up for a good time, hard-working, overdedicated super producer. One night after a long shoot the name Liz just rolled into Liz-ERD, as in lizard—not a shining moment for name giving, but it stuck. (Plus, it’s not like anyone really appreciates his or her nickname in the first place.)

 

 

MATT “BEAVER” GIOVINETTI

 

 

Director of Photography

Started: Season 1

Beaver is incredibly creative and always has an observation and a story to go along with it. I don’t know exactly where the name came from . . . Beaver Cleaver, perhaps, the all-American good kid in the neighborhood. For example, as Chico tells it: “When Beaver first entered the TV industry, he thought it would be a good idea to do a demo reel, like anyone would do. But the unique Beaver spin was that he hosted it, mullet, Napoleon Dynamite glasses, and all. In the video Beaver explained that he prefers to shoot, direct, and edit all his own material, “but sometimes it just doesn’t work out that way.” Now, what didn’t make the reel? Next time you see Matt, ask him about the Space Shuttle launch he shot . . . rather, ask him about the Shuttle launch that happened behind him while he was pointing at the wrong launch pad. Oh, Matt.

 

 

NEIL “BOY BAND” MARTIN

 

 

Associate Producer

Started: Season 3

For a full understanding of why he’s called Boy Band. When he first started with the Krew I didn’t think he’d make it past day one, but he got better by day two, and now life wouldn’t be the same without him on the Krew. If there’s somebody who knows the rules of the road on Triple D, it’s Boy Band. He’s been there, done that.

 

 

JEFF “BUTTERBEAN” ASELL

 

 

Audio Tech

Started: Season 6

When we first met Jeff, there was a resemblance to the heavyweight boxer Butterbean—just because of the bald head, of course. Butterbean, just like Big Bunny, is an audio tactical warrior. If I need something done, fixed, whatever, they’re on it—they’re mercenaries. (And just for the record, everybody who has a copy of the first book, please go into it with your pen and correct this: it’s not Assell, it’s Asell.)

 

 

RYAN “DONNY” LARSON

 

 

Cameraman

Started: Season 11

Breaking into the Krew is a tough thing to do because we’re a very tight-knit group. Ryan started as a PA following in the shadow of Neil, so that was not easy. But he made a name for himself, and why his nickname is Donny I do not know. He’s since been promoted to cameraman.

 

 

JOSH “THE ICE MAN” BANE

 

 

Cameraman

Started: Season 13

Let’s just say we call him The Ice Man because he keeps it so cool. (Who knows, there could be another reason for that name, but we don’t want to get into that.) Josh had to break into the Krew and learn the ways, but he’s so on point now.

 

 

KERRY “GILLIGAN” JOHNSON

 

 

Associate Producer

Started: Season 12

Not that there is always a clear understanding as to how a nickname came about, but this had something to do with the phrase “Hey, little buddy,” from when the Skipper calls Gilligan . . . and then somebody gets a hat with the name Gilligan on it, and then it’s all over, that’s his nickname. But he’s a student of the Neil “Boy Band” Martin school of PA—if I need it, Gilligan has already got it.

 

 

RON “FRAGGLE” GABALDON

 

 

Unit Manager

Started: Season 4

There was a series on HBO in the eighties called Fraggle Rock, and this guy is a character straight out of that show. He’s got one of the most important jobs of anybody: taking care of my car. (About which there will be stories to follow.)

 

 

TONY CARRERA

 

 

Production Assistant

Started: Season 13

Tony is the newest member of the Krew. He’s the rookie and doing a good job. He doesn’t have a lot to say, but he gets the job done. And there’s a nickname to come . . . got any ideas?

 

 

NORTHEAST AND MID-ATLANTIC

 

RINO’S PLACE

 

HANDMADE, REAL-DEAL ITALIAN. PERIOD.

 

How do you begin to explain this place on the east side of Boston? It’s a small, I mean small, little joint. Matter of fact, it’s so small they had to open up the waiting area in the bar across the street just to handle their overflow after they were on Triple D. The food’s outstanding, only to be eclipsed by the passion and generosity of Tony and his family.

TRACK IT DOWN

258 Saratoga Street

East Boston, MA 02128

617-567-7412

www.rinosplace.com

 

 

COURTESY OF TELEVISION FOOD NETWORK, G.P.

WITH MY HAIR, I SHOULDN’T BE AROUND FLAMES THAT BIG.

You know how much I love Italian—it’s gotta be handmade, homemade, and the real deal. This place is all that. The chef, Tony Dicenso, is a second-generation owner who was born in Italy and came to the United States in 1985. He took over from his parents in 1994. As he says, “This is what I was made to do.” He goes to the market two or three times a day to get the freshest produce, meats, and fish, makes things like his grandmother did, rolls the pasta out to order, uses nothing but the best, and serves it up in ridiculously large portions. I didn’t know whether to hug him or kidnap him to California. You’ve got to come meet this cat.

 

 

KREW NOTES

 

Liz “Erd” Pollock: Food here, second to none. That aside, something felt strange at this shoot right off the bat. There was a lot of testosterone, I guess you’d say. Soon I realized the chef, the director of photography, and of course Guy were all Italian. Then I looked over and asked the audio tech if he was Italian too, and Guy said, “He’s so Italian he has ricotta in his veins!” I’d like to say people normally listen to me on set, but I knew it was all over and I sat back, ate raviolis, and enjoyed the show.

Neil “Boy Band” Martin: For me, Rino’s Place is one of the top three Italian places we’ve put on the show. Anytime someone tells me they’re going to Boston, I tell them they must go and get the lobster ravioli, and if they have to wait in line to get in, they should wait. Tony is so meticulous about his product that he actually uses a teeny-tiny rolling pin to get the quarter ounce of meat out of the lobster legs.

 

COURTESY OF TELEVISION FOOD NETWORK, G.P.

LIVE CAM: A TEENY LOBSTER ROLLING PIN, PART OF TONY’S KEEBLER ELVES COOKING COLLECTION.

 

 

RESTAURANT UPDATE

From the day after our episode of DDD aired, our business has grown tremendously! We’ve had customers from all over the world. Guy, along with the production company, told us to be prepared and ready. My initial thought was, Really, how many people truly follow the show? Well, let me tell you—still today, they haven’t stopped coming. We recently opened up a lounge area where our customers waiting can enjoy a glass of wine, an ice-cold beer on tap, or even a light appetizer to hold them over. Our wait time can range anywhere from one to three hours, I kid you not. We couldn’t be more grateful to Guy Fieri and the DDD crew.

—TONY AND ANNA DICENSO

 

 

RINO’S SPECIAL

 

ADAPTED FROM A RECIPE COURTESY OF TONY DICENSO, RINO’S PLACE

 

Serves 4

Four 4-ounce veal cutlets (scaloppini)

Four 4-ounce chicken cutlets

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 cup plus 6 tablespoons olive oil

12 shiitake mushrooms, cleaned and stems discarded, sliced

3 ounces portobello mushrooms, finely diced

6 ounces oyster mushrooms, trimmed

3 tablespoons brandy

1 cup heavy cream

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

4 large shrimp, shelled and deveined

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Chopped parsley leaves, for garnish

Pasta, for serving, optional

 

I STICK OUT LIKE A SORE THUMB!

 

COURTESY OF TELEVISION FOOD NETWORK, G.P.

LIVE CAM: EVERYONE’S EXCITED TO SEE IF THIS DUDE KNOWS WHAT HE ORDERED.

1. Preheat the oven to 225°F.

2. Pound the veal and chicken into 1/4-inch-thick pieces between sheets of plastic wrap or waxed paper. Add the flour to a large shallow dish. Dredge the veal and chicken in the flour.

3. Heat 1/2 cup of the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Working in batches, add the veal and chicken and brown on one side, then flip, cooking for a total of 5 to 6 minutes. Set aside in a warm oven.

4. In a medium sauté pan, heat 2 tablespoons of the remaining olive oil over medium heat. Add the shiitake mushrooms and cook until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Remove the shiitakes, set aside, and add another 2 tablespoons olive oil to the pan. Add the portobellos and cook for 3 minutes. Remove the portobellos, set aside, then add the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil to the pan. Add the oyster mushrooms and cook for 7 minutes. Drain any excess oil from the pan and return the shiitakes and portobellos back to the pan. Remove the pan from the heat and pour the brandy into the pan. Using a long kitchen match, carefully ignite the brandy and burn off the alcohol. Return the pan to medium heat and stir in the cream and butter. Add the shrimp to the pan. Let cook and reduce for 4 minutes, or until shrimp are just cooked through then season with salt and pepper. You’re ready to serve.

5. Arrange 1 piece of veal, 1 piece of chicken, and 1 shrimp on each plate. Top with some mushrooms and sauce and garnish with parsley. Serve over pasta if you like.

 

 

BROADWAY DINER

 

WHERE UNCLE GEORGE DRIVES THE BUS TO FLAVORTOWN

 

This is where the line “I’m driving the bus to Flavortown” was made famous. It was all because of this guy, Uncle George. Broadway Diner is one of those monster diners that everybody loves on Triple D, and the owner, George Kavourakis, is as full of life and flavor as the dishes he makes. Portions are huge, and the Broadway Festival seafood pasta . . . as I said on the show, if I were stuck on a deserted island and all we had to eat was seafood, I don’t think I would get as much seafood as you get in that dish. And the goulash is goulicious. Watch out, everybody, ’cause George is going to be driving the bus to Flavortown.

You’ll find homemade everything from everywhere in this place, and you’ll feel like you’re family. George runs the place with his daughter and nephew, and he does things his own way, like wrapping his salmon in ribbons of potato and serving it over spinach with a scampi sauce. He makes his own spice mixtures and cooks his pastas perfectly al dente. George came to the United States from Greece and started as a dishwasher more than forty years ago, and his commitment to the classic diner hasn’t wavered. They’re open twenty-four hours—I’d come here at four in the morning, and at five and six and seven. This is where to come when you’re hungry.

TRACK IT DOWN

6501 Eastern Avenue

Baltimore, MD 21224

410-631-5666

www.broadwaydiner1.com

 

Mike “Father Time” Morris: Broadway Diner has a larger-than-life Greek chef, crankin’ out huge platters of non-diner food in a classic diner in Baltimore. And yes, this is where Guy and Chico had me, the producer, out in front of the place moving parking cones around . . . just enjoying themselves at my expense. But after it was over I did chase Guy with an orange cone.

 

 

KREW NOTES

 

Anthony “Chico” Rodriguez: Father Time’s Big Race: We were in the middle of two big intersections in Baltimore, about to shoot the stand-up (Guy’s opener) for the segment, and there happened to be huge orange construction drums in the background of where we wanted to shoot. So Mike (Father Time), being the ever-helpful producer that he is, offered to go move them. As he walked away, Guy gave me that sly smile, so I started rolling the camera. Father Time begins to move them and Guy yells, “Five feet to the left.” So Mike struggles and rolls them to the left. Then Guy yells, “Nope, that’s worse, go ten feet to the right,” so Mike then struggles and rolls them to the right. Guy then yells, “No, try moving backward.” So Mike moves them backward. Now this goes on for a good five minutes, while the camera is rolling and we’re all laughing. Finally, Mike realizes what’s going on and chases Guy all over, well, Baltimore.

 

JUST LIKE FATHER TIME—PLAYING IN TRAFFIC.

 

RESTAURANT UPDATE

Since being on Triple D we’ve been fortunate to have visitors from all over the country stop in for a bite! Whether we’re serving something that was featured on Triple D, one of our diner classics, or one of our new items, we’re happy that people recognize the diner and George! It’s amazing how far people will travel to try the Broadway Festival!

—PETE KAVOURAKIS

 

 

BROADWAY FESTIVAL (SEAFOOD PASTA)

 

ADAPTED FROM A RECIPE COURTESY OF CHEF GEORGE KAVOURAKIS, BROADWAY DINER

 

Serves 4

1 pound linguini

1/4 cup olive oil

1/2 medium onion, diced

10 garlic cloves, sliced

One 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

1/2 cup white wine

Two 5-ounce shell-on lobster tails, halved lengthwise

12 Manila clams, scrubbed

12 mussels, scrubbed and bearded

10 ounces large sea scallops

6 ounces calamari (tubes only), cut into rings

8 jumbo (U-12) shrimp, shelled and deveined

1/3 cup grated pecorino Romano cheese

1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh basil leaves

2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano leaves

Extra-virgin olive oil, for garnishing, optional

 

Courtesy of Pete Koroneos

 

COURTESY OF TELEVISION FOOD NETWORK, G.P.

UNCLE GEORGE IS SETTING FLAVORTOWN ON FIRE!

 

FATHER TIME IN HOT PURSUIT.

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the linguini and cook according to the package directions for al dente, about 10 minutes. Drain and set aside.

2. To make the sauce, in a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat and add the onion and garlic. Cook until softened but not browned, about 3 minutes. Add the crushed tomatoes and salt and pepper and simmer for 5 minutes. Next, add the white wine, lobster tails, clams, mussels, scallops, calamari, and shrimp. Cover and cook until the seafood is cooked through and opaque, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove and discard any shellfish that does not open. Add the cheese, basil, oregano, and cooked linguini. Toss until everything is coated with the sauce. Adjust the seasoning if needed and drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil, if using.

 

 

SIP & BITE RESTAURANT

 

COME FOR THE FOOD AND STAY FOR THE FLOOR SHOW

 

I’m not allowed to watch the rerun of Sip & Bite because I fall off my chair laughing. These guys are some of the funniest people I’ve met in my Triple D travels. The joint is legit, known to be the place to go by everybody and then some in Baltimore, and the crab cake is ridiculous. All the food is scratch made, and the spanakopita is an illegal bootlegged recipe. Yeah, you heard me, Sofia, bootlegged! You took it from your family, and I hope they’re gettin you back for it (ha ha ha). But really, what a fun place—you gotta check it out and make sure that the floor show is happening. Tony and Sofia Vasiliades are the Greek Lucy and Ricky show.

TRACK IT DOWN

2200 Boston Street

Baltimore, MD 21231

410-675-7077

www.sipandbite.com

 

 

COURTESY OF THE RESTAURANT

I’M NOT TICKLISH . . . BUT SOFIA STILL TRIED.

Sip & Bite is open 24/7, and it’s been a landmark in this town since 1938. It started with Grampa Tony, then passed to his son George, then on to George’s kid Tony. Sofia and Tony’s families are from the “same little mountain” in Greece and together they serve up classic Greek dishes, family recipes like Sofia’s grandmother’s spanakopita, and a Maryland specialty or two, like their crab cakes full of lump crabmeat that still follow Tony’s grandfather’s recipe.

Priceless: “Hey, Sofia, smell the spatula, I think it smells like goat cheese . . . Gotcha!”

 

COURTESY OF THE RESTAURANT

TONY, SOFIA, AND YES, THAT’S MICHAEL PHELPS. EAT HERE AND WIN GOLD.

 

 

KREW NOTES

 

Liz “Erd” Pollock: Guy is always funny, period. But man, this day, I don’t know if it was the tired sillies or too many Americanos, but the crew was on the floor as Guy did everything from having Sofia host the show to throwing food at her. He always has fun and makes everyone instantly at ease, but throwing food (at the chef, anyway) was a first and will go down as DDD history, at least for the crew.

Kerry “Gilligan” Johnson: Sofia was ready to take over the show—literally. And Michael Phelps frequents the restaurant.

Ryan “Donny” Larson: This is where we celebrated Guy’s manager, Reid’s, birthday. We decorated the whole dining room with balloons and ribbons . . . and then we all pooled in and gave him twenty-eight cents.

 

RESTAURANT UPDATE

When Guy came to visit our restaurant, it was a dream come true! After the airing of our episode on Food Network, we’ve had the pleasure of meeting so many wonderful fans of Triple D, many of whom have traveled great distances to stop by for a bite and a hello. We can’t thank Guy, his crew, and his loyal fans enough for this great honor!

—TONY AND SOFIA VASILIADES

 

 

SOFIA’S SPANAKOPITA

 

ADAPTED FROM A RECIPE COURTESY OF SOFIA VASILIADES, SIP & BITE

 

Serves 12

2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 cups finely chopped leeks (white part only)

2 cups finely chopped shallots or onions

Three 10-ounce bags fresh spinach, roughly chopped

2 cups chopped scallions (white and green parts)

21/2 cups cubed feta cheese

2 cups ricotta cheese

1/2 cup grated kefalotiri cheese (worth looking for, or substitute pecorino Romano)

21/2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill

2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh mint

2 teaspoons ground black pepper

11/2 teaspoons freshly grated nutmeg

4 large eggs, 2 whole, 2 beaten

1 cup olive oil, for brushing

1 box (16 ounces) phyllo dough

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Heat the extra-virgin olive oil in large pot over medium heat. Add the garlic, leeks, and shallots and sauté until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the spinach and scallions and cover the pot for a few minutes until the spinach has wilted significantly. Uncover, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer to allow the liquid to evaporate (be sure not to let the spinach mixture burn). When most of the liquid has evaporated, about 15 minutes, transfer to a large bowl and let cool for 10 minutes.

3. In a separate large bowl, mix the feta, ricotta, and kefalotiri cheeses, the dill, mint, pepper, nutmeg, and 2 of the whole eggs. Gently fold the cheese mixture into the cooled spinach mixture.

4. Brush a 9 x 13-inch baking pan with some olive oil. Gently place 1 sheet of the phyllo in the bottom of the pan and brush with olive oil, making sure to coat well. Repeat this step 8 times. This creates a nice strong base for serving.

5. Pour in the spinach filling and spread it out evenly. Place 6 sheets of phyllo on top of the spinach, making sure to coat each layer of dough very well with olive oil. Also make sure to tuck in the edges of the phyllo around the filling all around the perimeter of the pan (to make it look pretty). Brush the top with the 2 beaten eggs (they give the spanakopita a beautiful brown color after baking). Score the pie in 12 square portion sizes. Bake for 1 hour, until the top is a deep golden brown, rotating halfway through the baking time.

COOK’S NOTE: Cover the phyllo dough with a slightly moist kitchen towel as you’re working to keep it from drying out, and be sure to work quickly.

 

MOMENTS LATER, SOFIA TRIED TO HOTWIRE THE ’68.

 

 

RINCON CRIOLLO

 

CUBAN FOOD MECCA

 

If you ask me to authenticate an Italian restaurant, I got you. Barbecue? I am totally down. Mexican? Been cooking it most of my life. But when it comes to Cuban . . . to make sure I was delivering you the real deal I had to call in one of my favorite chefs and one of the craziest people allowed on the planet: Chef Carl “The Cuban” Ruiz. Even before we visited the place, he knew about it. He told me it was as Cuban as Cuban gets, and coming from The Cuban, that’s pretty darn Cuban. (That was a lot of “Cuban!”)

When I say this place is authentic . . . the original restaurant was opened in Cuba in 1950, when current co-owner Rudy Acosta’s grandfather started the business. All the recipes come from Rudy’s great uncle, Rene Acosta, who still keeps an eye on the joint. The one condition Rene has is Don’t touch the recipes. Judging by the made-to-order, killer arroz con pollo or the house favorite, ropa vieja, I’d say that’s a fair deal. This isn’t just a restaurant—it’s a cultural experience.

TRACK IT DOWN

40-09 Junction Boulevard

Corona, Queens, NY 11368

718-458-0236

www.rinconcriollo.wix.com

 

 

COURTESY OF THE RESTAURANT

MAX AND RUDY LIVIN’ LARGE BEHIND THE BAR.

 

 

KREW NOTES

 

Bryna “The Pirate” Levin: It was my job to research locations for New York City, my hometown and the biggest food metropolis on the planet. It was challenging. I spoke to more than one hundred places and researched many more online before coming up with the eight places we would end up shooting. Guy’s friend Carl Ruiz, a Cuban chef who frequently works with Guy, gave me the name of his favorite Cuban joint in Queens, Rincon Criollo. They passed the many layers of scrutiny a restaurant has to go through to make the cut. So of course Guy invited Carl out to cook a Cuban dish with him on the show with the owner. Carl comes to the set early and he’s proud to be wearing a custom-made shirt, which is grand, but it’s bright white and so is the owner’s chef’s jacket. I don’t want two bright white shirts on my set—it wouldn’t look good on camera and it would make the two of them look too much alike. So Carl goes a few doors down, where there’s a thrift store, and comes back with some shirts. He tries them on and they’re all ridiculously large. He goes back for more, same bad results. Finally I go with him and we find something, it’s blue, it fits, it’s from Lands’ End—something he would never ever wear under normal circumstances. So he’s making his DDD debut and he’s stuck in a secondhand purchase not of his own choosing. Aside from some minor muttering and a few veiled threats, he was a pretty good sport about it.

Then Guy, Carl, and the chef are making the first dish, and for some reason Guy asks Carl to dance and for even more unknowable reasons, Carl does. I find the whole thing more than silly and suggest that the “dance” shouldn’t be in the finished piece. Well, not only did they use it in the segment, it’s in the tease at the top of the show, it’s in the year-end blooper reel, and it’s in a webisode on the FN website. Shows how much I know, or maybe it just proves what a good dancer The Cuban is.

 

IS THAT CARL “THE CUBAN” OR A LIDO DECK DANCER FROM THE LOVE BOAT?

 

RESTAURANT UPDATE

We’ve been getting a great number of fans of Triple D filling up our seats since the show aired. People from Washington, DC, Pittsburgh, even Canada have been coming, excited to try our delicious ropa vieja and arroz con pollo!

—RUDY ACOSTA

 

 

RINCON CRIOLLO’S ARROZ CON POLLO

 

ADAPTED FROM A RECIPE COURTESY OF RENE AND RUDY ACOSTA, RINCON CRIOLLO

 

Serves 4

About 6 tablespoons Spanish olive oil

1 whole chicken, cut into 6 pieces

1 Spanish onion, chopped (about 11/2 cups)

1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped (about 1 cup)

3/4 to 1 cup Garlic Paste (recipe follows)

4 whole canned peeled tomatoes, crushed by hand

11/2 cups white wine

1 bottle of beer, such as Budweiser

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon dried basil

1 teaspoon ground white pepper

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 to 2 tablespoons chicken stock base

2 cups uncooked rice

About 2 tablespoons bijol (achiote or annatto powder)

Salt

1 cup green peas, for garnish

1 cup chopped roasted red bell pepper, for garnish

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Heat the olive oil in a large Dutch oven (with a cover) over medium-high heat. Place the chicken pieces in the pot and cook for a few minutes on each side, just enough to brown the chicken, working in batches if necessary.

3. Place all the chicken pieces in the pot and add the onion, green bell pepper, garlic paste, and tomatoes. This is the sofrito. Cook this sofrito, stirring frequently, until the onions have softened, about 4 minutes, then add the wine. Pour in the beer (I always save myself a sip). Add the oregano, basil, white pepper, cumin, and chicken stock base.

4. Add the rice to the chicken and vegetables. Sprinkle in bijol until the rice turns a yellowish color. Season with salt. Bring to a simmer, reduce the heat to low, cover, and bake in the oven for about 40 minutes, until the rice and the chicken are cooked through. It’s important that the rice is as risotto-like as possible; the rice should not be allowed to completely absorb all the juices in the pot.

5. Sprinkle the green peas and roasted red bell pepper on top to garnish.

 

GARLIC PASTE

Makes about 21/2 cups

20 garlic cloves, peeled

2 cups vegetable oil

Place garlic cloves and oil in a blender. Puree until a paste forms. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week, or 2 months in the freezer.

COOK’S NOTE: Leftover paste can be used to make quick garlic bread, or it can be added to salad dressings, pasta sauces, or meat marinades.

 

 

JOHN’S OF 12TH STREET

 

OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF HISTORY IN EVERY BADA-BING BITE

 

I don’t know about you, but I’m a big fan of old-school mob movies. You know, Goodfellas, and in particular The Godfather. But coming from Cali, we don’t have many hundred-year-old Italian restaurants like the kind you can find in a mob movie or in NYC’s East Village, so when I got the lowdown on this joint where they’re servin’ up homemade pappardelle and veal meatballs—veal meatballs, are you kidding me?—it was time to step back in time.

Opened in 1908 by Umbrian immigrant John Pucciatti, this place comes by its old school the old-fashioned way. Since 1973, John’s been run by Nicky Sitnycky (yes, that’s his name—I thought it was a nickname!) in the front and Mikey “2 Names” Alpert in the back. The former owner, John’s son Daniel, passed down to these former stockbrokers the original recipe book, and they didn’t change an ingredient or method. Tradition is a beautiful thing. There’s even a set of candles that have been burning since 1933, the year Prohibition ended.

TRACK IT DOWN

302 East 12th Street

New York, NY 10003

212-475-9531

www.johnsof12thstreet.com

 

 

KREW NOTES

 

Mike “Father Time” Morris: Doesn’t get much more Italian than this place. You go here for your Godfather fix.

Kerry “Gilligan” Johnson: Gas up!

 

 

CAMARO-GATE

 

RON “FRAGGLE” GABALDON: Making a show like DDD is like being part of a well-oiled machine. What most folks forget is that the machine is made out of people. Let’s not dwell on what a machine like that might look like, but for the most part it works. And some days the machine springs a gasket.

While shooting at John’s in New York, Mario Batali dropped in to have some fun with us on the set. We put together a quick bit that had Mario drive off in the Camaro, leaving Guy with the tab. The weather was turning south that afternoon, giving us little time left to shoot outside before rain would make it impossible. The Camaro was ready with Mario in the driver’s seat; they have a little exchange, and Mario drives off. Perfect on the first take! We all had a good laugh at the antics and waited for Mario to roll around the block so we could try it again. And we waited . . . Guy’s phone rings and it’s Mario. The Camaro stalled going around the corner. I took off at a sprint for the corner, going over what might have gone wrong with the ’68. Was it the spark plugs? The fuel filter? Did it overheat? I’m not a mechanic, but part of my job is to keep up on the maintenance of the Camaro, and since it’s a classic car, it requires a lot of fine-tuning and attention.

There was already a crowd gathered where the Camaro had come to a stop. Mario let me take over the car and walked back to the restaurant. I tried the engine to see if I could hear what the problem was, but a quick look down at the gauges was all I needed. The Camaro was out of gas. All the preparation, the organization that goes into each shoot, and the thing that trips me up is putting gas in the car. Fortunately, I didn’t have much time to dwell on it, because that was when the rain started. I had maybe thirty seconds to get the roof up, and of course that would be a perfect time for the roof motor to quit. . . .

 

 

RESTAURANT UPDATE

A lot of diners who saw the show remember the banter back and forth with Guy about measuring ingredients. So I tell them, “It’s all about the one, two, ‘tree,’ right?” They say, “You’re right!” They love that.

Just recently people drove three hours from Massachusetts just to dine at the restaurant and then drove three hours back home. Here’s a conversation with Erin from Ohio while making a reservation:

Mike: When were you here last?

Erin: Never.

Mike: How did you hear about us?

Erin (a bit breathlessly): Guy tells me . . . everything . . .

—MIKE ALPERT

 

 

POLPETTE DI VITELLO (VEAL MEATBALLS)

 

ADAPTED FROM A RECIPE COURTESY OF MIKE ALPERT, JOHN’S OF 12TH STREET

 

Makes about 20 meatballs

1/2 loaf Italian bread, crust removed, roughly chopped (about 11/2 cups)

1/4 cup milk

2 large eggs

1/4 cup grated pecorino Romano cheese

1/2 cup chopped scallions (white and green parts)

1/4 cup Caramelized Onions (recipe follows)

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

1 tablespoon dried basil

1 tablespoon dried oregano

6 garlic cloves, finely chopped

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus 2 tablespoons for serving

1 cup Marsala wine, plus a splash for serving

2 pounds ground veal

1/4 to 1/2 cup breadcrumbs

1/2 cup marinara sauce for coating the cookie sheet, plus more for serving with the meatballs

2 tablespoons olive oil, for serving

Chopped freshly basil, for garnish

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. In a large bowl, combine the bread and milk. Squeeze the bread until the milk is absorbed and the bread dissolves. Add the eggs and mix together. Add the cheese, scallions, caramelized onions, Worcestershire sauce, basil, oregano, and garlic. Season with salt and pepper and mix together.

3. Melt the 4 tablespoons butter in the pan over medium-high heat, add the wine, and cook for 3 minutes to reduce. Cool.

 

New York Times Bestseller

In Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives: The Funky Finds in Flavortown, Guy Fieri, one of Food Network’s biggest stars, keeps his motto front and center: “If it’s funky, I’ll find it.”

Continuing the series of New York Times bestselling books, Diners, Drive-ins and Dives includes profiles of great American restaurants, delicious recipes, tons of photos, hilarious stories from Guy, his Krew, and the restaurant owners, and a tricked-out, full-color fold-out map of the United States featuring every restaurant in the book.

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