Everyday Mexican Instant Pot Cookbook by Leslie Limón [pdf, epub] 1641522194

Everyday Mexican Instant Pot Cookbook: Regional Classics Made Fast and Simple

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  • Title: Everyday Mexican Instant Pot Cookbook: Regional Classics Made Fast and Simple
  • Autor: Leslie Limón
  • Publisher (Publication Date): Rockridge Press (October 30, 2018)
  • Language: English
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Designer: Merideth Harte

Editor: Kim Suarez

Production Editor: Andrew Yackira

Photography © Nadine Greeff, p. 25 © Hélène Dujardin; food styling by TamiiHardeman

Map illustration by Merideth Harte

ISBN: Print 978-1-64152-219-9 | eBook 978-1-64152-220-5

 

 

*

Dedication

To Hope, Nick, Ashley, and Jack for always believing in their mom and adding flavor to my life. I love you forever and always.

 

 

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1: Mexican Food Fast & Easy

RECIPES

CHAPTER 2: Salsas & Sauces

CALDILLO DE JITOMATE Mexican Tomato Salsa

QUESO BLANCO DIP

CLASSIC TOMATILLO AND ÁRBOL CHILE SALSA

NACHO CHEESE SAUCE

QUESO FUNDIDO A LA CERVEZA Boozy Queso Fundido

SALSA DE CHILE COLORADO Red Chile Salsa

SALSA GEMMA Gemma-Style Salsa

SALSA RANCHERA Ranch-Style Salsa

SPICY SALSA VERDE

CHAPTER 3: Rice & Beans

CLASSIC MEXICAN RICE

ARROZ BLANCO White Rice

ARROZ VERDE Green Rice

FRIJOLES DE LA OLLA Cooked Beans

FRIJOLES BORRACHOS Drunken Beans

FRIJOLES MENEADOS Refried Beans

FRIJOLES PUERCOS Pork and Bean Stew

SOPA DE GARBANZOS Chickpea Soup

SOPA DE LENTEJAS Lentil Soup

CHAPTER 4: Soups, Stews & Chilies

ALBÓNDIGAS EN CALDILLO Meatball Soup in Tomato Broth

BLACK BEAN, SWEET POTATO, AND CHORIZO CHILI

CALDO DE POLLO Mexican Chicken Soup

SOPA DE FIDEO Mexican Noodle Soup

TEX-MEX CHILI

COCIDO DE RES Mexican Beef Soup

GALLINA PINTA Beef, Bean, and Hominy Soup

GREEN CHICKEN POZOLE

MENUDO/PANCITA Tripe Soup

MOLE DE OLLA Spicy Chicken and Vegetable Soup

POZOLE BLANCO White Pozole

TRADITIONAL RED PORK POZOLE

VEGETARIAN CHILI

CHILE RELLENO CHOWDER

CHAPTER 5: Vegetable Mains

TACOS DE RAJAS CON CREMA Roasted Poblano Strips with Cream Tacos

CAULIFLOWER TINGA

LENTIL PICADILLO

JACKFRUIT AL PASTOR TACOS

CHILEATOLE VERDE Salsa Verde Soup

PORTOBELLO ALAMBRES Portobello Fajitas with Bacon and Cheese

EJOTES EN SALSA DE CHILE COLORADO Green Beans in Red Chile Sauce

TAMALES DE RAJAS Roasted Poblano Pepper Tamales

CALABACITAS Mexican Zucchini

CHAPTER 6: Chicken

ARROZ CON POLLO Chicken with Rice

BARBACOA DE POLLO Chicken Barbacoa

CALDO TLALPEÑO Tlalpeño-Style Chicken and Chickpea Soup

CARNITAS DE POLLO Chicken Carnitas

CHIPOTLE-GLAZED WINGS

MOLE DE GUAJOLOTE Turkey Mole

POLLO A LA CACEROLA Mexican Chicken Cacciatore

POLLO A LA CREMA CON RAJAS Poblano Chicken

POLLO ADOBADO CON PAPAS Adobo Chicken and Potatoes

ALBÓNDIGAS DE POLLO AL CHIPOTLE Chipotle Chicken Meatballs

SHREDDED CHICKEN TACOS A LA MEXICANA

SALSA VERDE SHREDDED CHICKEN TAQUITOS

SOPA DE LIMA Mexican Lime Soup

SOPA DE TORTILLA Tortilla Soup

CHAPTER 7: Beef & Pork

ASADO DE BODA Mexican Wedding Pork Roast

BEER-BRAISED BEEF ROAST

BEEF SHANK BARBACOA

PORK CARNITAS

PORK CHILE COLORADO

PORK CHILE VERDE

PORK TINGA TOSTADAS

ROPA VIEJA A LA MEXICANA Mexican-Style Ropa Vieja

GRAMM’S FAMOUS SHREDDED BEEF CHILE COLORADO TAMALES

COCHINITA PIBIL Pibil-Style Pork

CARNE DE PUERCO CON CHILE Pork in Chile Sauce

BIRRIA DE RES Beef Birria

TACOS DE LENGUA Beef Tongue Tacos

MOLE PULLED PORK SLIDERS

CHAPTER 8: Sweets & Desserts

ARROZ CON TRES LECHES Mexican Three-Milk Rice Pudding

ATOLE DE AVENA Mexican Oatmeal

CAFÉ DE OLLA Mexican Coffee

CHAMPURRADO Mexican Hot Chocolate Porridge

CAMOTES ENMIELADOS Candied Yams

CAPIROTADA Mexican Bread Pudding

CAPIROTADA DE LECHE Mexican Bread Pudding with Milk

CHAPTER 9: Sides & Staples

TORTILLAS DE MAÍZ Corn Tortillas

MASA HARINA CORNBREAD

ROASTED POBLANO PEPPERS

PICO DE GALLO VERDE

NOPALES

GUACAMOLE

SALSA DE PEPINO Cucumber Salsa

PICKLED RED ONIONS

FRUITY AGUA FRESCA

 

Instant Pot® Cooking Time Charts

Measurement Conversions

The Dirty Dozen and the Clean Fifteen™

About the Author

 

 

INTRODUCTION

It’s no secret that I love Mexican food. It’s the food I grew up eating, having been raised by my Mexican grandparents. It’s the food I continue to enjoy and make for my family, and it’s the new-to-me foods that I discovered during the 18 years I lived in Mexico. And really, what’s not to love? Mexican food has become one of the most popular cuisines in America, and with very good reason: It’s absolutely delicious and so easy to make.

Mexican food is more than just tacos though. It’s hearty soups and stews like menudo and pozole. It’s roasted meats like Cochinita Pibil and barbacoa. It’s rich one-pot meals—also known as guisados—like bistec ranchero. It’s traditional staples like frijoles charros and Mexican rice. It’s sweet, comforting desserts like arroz con leche. But it’s also modern Tex-Mex and Cal-Mex twists to the classics like Mole Pulled Pork Sliders and Chile Relleno Chowder. These are just a few of the dishes you’ll learn to make from this book.

While more and more people are choosing to make Mexican cuisine at home, the majority of Americans get their Mexican food fix from dining out at taquerias, fast-food chains, and restaurants. Albeit tasty and satisfying on the spot, most of the food in chains and restaurants is either fried, greasy, covered in cheese, or full of unnecessary fat and sodium.

But that doesn’t have to be the case. You can make delicious Mexican food at home that is not only healthy and full of flavor, but also quick and easy. The Instant Pot® lets you do just that because it locks in the flavor and the nutrients of whatever you’re cooking.

The Instant Pot® is not your abuelita’s (grandma’s) pressure cooker! I used to be so afraid of my grandmother’s pressure cooker—which she often used to cook beans or shredded beef for her famous tamales—because of the constant hissing and wobbling of that little knob that seemed to get louder and louder as it boiled away on the stove. Because I’ve tested and retested every recipe in this book to bring you authentic Mexican flavor and incorporate real-user best practices specifically for the appliance, I now know that there is nothing to fear when using an electric pressure cooker.

If you already own an Instant Pot® and are looking for new foods to prepare, or if you just want to re-create the dishes that you always order from your favorite Mexican restaurant but are feeling intimidated by certain ingredients, this is the cookbook for you. The Everyday Mexican Instant Pot® Cookbook teaches you how to make everything from salsas to rice and beans to desserts, and everything in between. And if you have some extra time, the last recipe chapter features simple, essential staples like homemade Corn Tortillas, refreshing Pico de Gallo Verde, and Fruity Agua Fresca that don’t require an Instant Pot® to help you prepare a proper Mexican feast your abuelita would approve.

 

 

ARROZ CON POLLO

 

 

CHAPTER 1

Mexican Food Fast & Easy

 

“The Instant Pot® works magic on ingredients that are common to the Mexican table—be it fresh or dried chiles, garlic, meats, or beans. It makes humble ingredients downright special. It frankly makes them sing.”

 

 

Ilearned about the finer points of Mexican food firsthand when I moved from Southern California to a town two hours north of Guadalajara. There, in the heart of Mexico, my suegra (mother-in-law) taught me to cook traditional Mexican dishes. Even beforehand, though, some of my earliest childhood memories are of watching my grandmother make homemade flour tortillas and her storied shredded pork tamales, and my abuelito (grandpa)—the family baker—drying orejones de manzana (apple slices) to make empanadas and capirotada (bread pudding). Collectively, it all left its mark.

Fast-forward to the present day. With three hungry teens and a college student, time is of the essence. Just as important is the need to put healthy, hearty food on the table. Enter my electric pressure cooker (a.k.a. the Instant Pot®). This indispensable kitchen tool lets me coax out layers of flavor in no time flat, and it ensures that I get homemade meals on the table while supporting my passion for authentic Mexican fare.

Whether you are new to the electric pressure cooker, don’t own one yet, or consider yourself an Instant Pot® whiz, these recipes are for you. The scent of rich, slow-cooked Mexican classics—and interpretations of my own—will waft through your home while you make the most of your time and energy.

 

Mexican Food Is Healthy Food

Mexican food sometimes gets a bad rap from those who consider it to be greasy fast food. I’m here to say that’s a misnomer. Authentic Mexican food is more than just tacos and quesadillas—much, much more. The cuisine reflects both the vast diversity of the people who created it and the land that’s teeming with natural resources. In reality, true Mexican cuisine capitalizes on the country’s abundance of fresh produce, and it’s time that those not in the know take stock. Fortunately, an electric pressure cooker has the power to help cooks break out of the standard Mexican repertoire served in Americanized Mexican restaurants. Before you know it, you’ll be making Tacos de Rajas con Crema with the best of them!

I’d also suggest thinking about ways you can turn healthy ingredients, like lentils, into a Mexican-inspired feast, just like I have with Lentil Picadillo. Or substituting vegetables for fattier proteins, as I do with Cauliflower Tinga. At the end of the day, the sky is the limit. You just need to master the pressure cooker and a handful of Mexican pantry essentials.

 

The Traditions of Mexican Cooking & Pressure Cooking

Pressure cooking is nothing new in Mexican kitchens. In fact, home cooks have relied on the power of pressure cooking for generations for comforting and hearty dishes, such as soul-stirring soups and stews, pots of toothsome ranchero beans, and—everyone’s favorite—carnitas.

From rural kitchens, where much cooking occurs over an open flame, to urban homes countrywide, I’ve learned this: The more things change, the more they stay the same. Thousands of years after chiles, maize, and squash were domesticated, many of the same ancient cooking tools—like the cazuela, metate, molcajete, and comal—are employed to this day.

Admittedly, everyone is abuzz about electric pressure cookers these days—and with good reason. For starters, they’ve come a long way, offering a bevy of self-regulating safety features, including sensors to monitor temperature and amount of pressure. However, they’re nothing new in the Mexican kitchen, really, where pressure cookers have remained in regular rotation.

Yes, the electric pressure cooker is a more modern addition to Mexican kitchens, but by no means is pressure cooking new. That said, the benefit is clear: You simply plug it in, tap a button, and it goes to work. Just as user-friendly as a slow cooker, this time-saving appliance has an added benefit: It effectively gets dinner on the table a full day sooner, supporting modern cooks’ need for time management and convenience.

Add to that the fact that it works magic on ingredients that are common to the Mexican table, be it fresh or dried chiles, garlic, meats, or beans. It makes humble ingredients downright special. It frankly makes them sing.

Moreover, an electric pressure cooker combines flavors effectively. Whereas complex Mexican stews once required a clay cazuela for simmering the sauce and a pressure cooker for tenderizing meat before they were combined to meld flavors, an electric pressure cooker effectively does both, all at once! The results are rich, layered, and commingled dishes. Really, they speak for themselves.

An electric pressure cooker even works wonders on cooked salsas, ones that can be spooned over eggs, scooped up with chips, or used to blanket enchiladas. Need to make rice and beans in a flash? How about rice pudding? Good news: The Instant Pot® has your back.

Further, given Mexican cuisine’s penchant for using tougher cuts of meat, the electric pressure cooker is a godsend. When such a cut of meat is cooked in an ample amount of sauce, the pressure cooker breaks down the protein’s chewy fibers, yielding fork-tender, melt-in-your-mouth results.

That’s true whether you’re tackling birria (shredded meat that has been slow roasted in an underground pit and is served in a flavorful chile-infused sauce) or beef tongue tacos.

The Mexican Pantry

To make things easy on yourself, stock your pantry with basic ingredients and tools. That way, cooking Mexican food can become an effortless part of your routine.

HERBS AND SPICES

Allspice: These peppercorn-like berries are commonly toasted and ground to add warmth to salsas, moles, and stews. Save time by buying them already ground.

Bay leaves: Mexican bay laurel is used to infuse marinades, soups, and stews with flavor.

Cilantro: Used generously in Mexican cuisine, this annual appears in everything from salsa to rice dishes, soups, and moles. Even though fresh is best, do keep dried cilantro in your pantry to use in a pinch. Note: Many of the recipes in this book call for cilantro sprigs. These are edible, but some people prefer to remove them before serving.

Cinnamon: Mexican cinnamon, also called Ceylon cinnamon, is warm and fragrant. It’s sold both as sticks and ground.

Cumin: Strong and toasty cumin seeds are sold both ground and whole. In the case of the latter, they should be toasted.

Oregano: The Mexican variety of this herb is frequently used dried in dishes like pozole and tomato-based soups.

Sesame seeds: An essential ingredient in moles, these nutty seeds also show up in baked goods, such as bread.

Thyme: This aromatic herb is often used to pickle vegetables, as well as to flavor slow-simmered dishes, like stew.

BEANS

Black beans: Also called black turtle beans, this small, shiny, dark purple–to-black variety is rich and meaty tasting, making it a popular choice to use in vegetarian chili and as frijoles refritos (refried beans) in burritos.

Flor de Mayo beans: Native to Mexico and known for their outstanding flavor, these small bush beans range in color from lilac to purplish to tan.

Mayocoba beans: Originally from Peru, these mild, buttery beans are medium in size and pale yellow in color. They’re often used in soups, as well as to make refried beans.

Peruano beans: Light cream, buff, or yellow in color, these mild-tasting, creamy beans originated in the Peruvian Andes and can be used in dishes calling for navy, cannellini, or pinto beans.

Pinto beans: Eaten whole, in burritos, in broth, and mashed and refried, pinto beans are the most common bean variety used in Mexican cuisine.

See here for a cooking chart for beans and grains.

GRAINS

Corn: Used to make tortillas, tostadas, tamales, tlacoyos, crunchy tortilla chips, and iconic elotes, this staple ingredient is integral to Mexican cooking.

Flour: The basis for flour tortillas—and crowd-pleasers like quesadillas—flour is also essential to many Mexican baked goods, including sandwich rolls and cookies.

White rice: Whether you crave horchata, arroz (rice), or arroz rojo (redrice), this pantry staple is prevalent in Mexican cuisine.

PACKAGED, BOTTLED, CANNED

Achiote: Orange-red seeds from this tropical shrub or small tree are commonly used in Yucatan cuisine, particularly pork and chicken dishes.

Canned beans: High in fiber and extra quick when you’re in a time crunch, canned beans come in lots of varieties. Use ones that are low in sodium so you can salt dishes your way.

Canned tomatoes: Keep these on hand to make quick salsas, sauces, soups, and stews. Fire-roasted tomatoes add another excellent layer of flavor.

Chipotles en adobo: These smoked and dried jalapeños are reconstituted and canned in a tangy, spiced tomato, vinegar and garlic purée.

Chocolate: Sold in round bricks, Mexican chocolate is sweetened with extra sugar and spiced with cinnamon, and it’s used to flavor drinks—such as chocolate de agua and champurrado (both types of Mexican hot chocolate)—as well as some moles.

Dried chiles: A variety of dried chiles—such as ancho, guajillo, and chiles de árbol—are imperative to have in your culinary toolbox. Use them for everything from enchilada sauce to salsas.

Hot sauce: Add heat to your dishes with some of the many Mexican hot sauces, such as Tapatío, Valentino, Cholula, and El Yucateco’s Salsa Picante de Chile Habanero, of which there are several kinds.

Lard: This fat of choice in Mexican kitchens was first introduced by the Spanish. It’s used for making flour tortillas and tamales and frying masa-based snacks, and is essential to the preparation of carnitas and chicharrón.

Pepitas: These pumpkin seeds can be ground and used as a thickener for moles and other sauces, and are a common ingredient in Mexican candies. They’re also eaten as a snack while still in their hulls. Meanwhile, in central Mexico, they’re peeled and used to make sweet, puffed amaranth bars called alegrías.

Tortillas: Keep packaged flour and corn tortillas on hand. When you have time, make your own, using the recipe Tortillas de Maís

Vinegar: White and apple cider vinegars are used to pickle vegetables, make vinaigrettes, and add nuance to one-pot meals.

Essential Equipment

A well-stocked Mexican kitchen needs a few basic tools. Here’s what I suggest.

A kitchen thermometer is important to have on hand for checking the internal temperature of meat. A probe with a remote display makes things easier still.

Kitchen tongs come in handy when cooking in a deep electric pressure cooker, enabling you to turn and toss ingredients effortlessly.

A ladle is essential for serving chili, soups, and stews directly from your Instant Pot®. Look for one with a wide, shallow bowl.

Silicone oven mitts help when it comes time to lift the inner pot in and out of your electric pressure cooker. They also protect your fingers from hot steam burns during the pressure release phase.

A flexible spatula lets you turn and flip ingredients in the event they get stuck. Look for one that’s made of silicone for the best results.

NICE TO HAVE

Having an extra inner pot is helpful when you don’t want to do dishes in between, but are looking to cook more than one Instant Pot® dish for a meal.

A fat separator—while not required—is helpful when it comes time to strain sauces and cooking liquids. Simply pour liquid into the vessel, watch the fat rise to the top, and pour the defatted liquid back into your electric pressure cooker to thicken, reduce, or blend into a sauce.

A tempered glass lid is beneficial when you’re sautéing or slow cooking items in an electric pressure cooker.

FAQs

Whether or not you’ve used an electric pressure cooker before, I know you might have questions. It’s fair. I want it to be easy for you to make as many recipes as possible, so I’ve included some common questions and offered answers and solutions based on my experience.

1.Periodically, my electric pressure cooker makes a ticking or popping sound. Why?

Unless the bottom of the inner pot was wet when you began cooking (it should be dry), this is normal! You’ll hear a tick or light cracking sound when the power switches or when pressure expands when it’s changing temperature.

2.My Instant Pot® is hissing and spitting out steam while coming to pressure. Is this normal?

As long as the pressure release handle is in the “sealing” position and you have enough liquid in your pot, this is normal. You can expect to see steam coming out of the pressure release (a.k.a. steam release) handle or float valve. Give it some time and your Instant Pot® float valve will rise up and the pot will be pressurized.

3.I just can’t get my rice to have the right consistency. What’s happening?

If your rice is too hard either you need more water or the rice didn’t cook long enough. In the case of the former, adjust the water ratio according to the recipe. If you open the lid too early, put it back on and let the rice sit for 5 minutes or so after the cooking cycle completes.

4.If I double a recipe, do I double the cook time?

No, the actual cook time is the same. Just be aware it could take a little longer for the appliance to come to pressure.

5.Are there foods that don’t work well in an electric pressure cooker?

Foods like noodles can foam, froth, and sputter, ultimately clogging the appliance. Other foods that can cause excess pressure include applesauce, rhubarb, cranberries, split peas, oatmeal, and other cereals. Remember, too, that pressure cookers add moisture, so don’t expect crispy foods—as well as baked goods made with dough like phyllo—to turn out right. Finally, delicate foods, like certain types of fish, may not yield the results you’re looking for.

6.What are the best foods to cook in an Instant Pot®?

Nothing beats beans, soups, stews, and meats that require slow cooking, since the appliance significantly reduces cooking time.

7.Can I use my electric pressure cooker for canning?

It can be used for boiled-water canning, though altitude may affect the cooking temperature. However, do not use your pressure cooker for pressure canning. Refer to the USDA Complete Guide to Pressure Canning for complete canning guidelines.

8.Why is it taking my pressure cooker so long to come to pressure?

This is impacted by a variety of factors, including how much you have in the pot. A fuller pot takes longer to come to pressure. Also, the type of food that’s in the pot can affect timing (liquid foods take longer to come to pressure than dense ones).

9.Is an electric pressure cooker actually capable of baking?

It’s not an oven, so it’s technically not baking anything. But you can cook baked goods, such as cakes or quick breads, this way. Just be aware that they’re getting steamed, not baked. They will, however, cook up light and fluffy.

10.Can I cook foods from frozen?

You can, though I don’t recommend it. If you opt to cook them, be aware that it’ll take longer for the pot to come to pressure. Plus, it works better to cook items that have been frozen in a flat layer rather than big chunks (or roasts). When the pot does come to temperature, the cooking time is the same.

11.What’s the difference between natural pressure release and quick pressure release?

When your pot finishes its cooking cycle, it beeps to let you know. At this point, most recipes tell you to release pressure naturally (which occurs gradually), release pressure quickly, or do a combination of both.

12.How do I clean my electric pressure cooker?

The cooker base houses the heating element, so you need to avoid getting it wet. Never place your Instant Pot® in the dishwasher. Instead, clean the exterior of the cooking base with a damp cloth, and use a slightly damp cloth to clean the interior of the cooker. That said, the inner pot of the cooker (the stainless steel cooking pot), the lid, the sealing ring, and the steam rack can be washed by hand and generally also can be washed in the dishwasher.

13.Should I be worried about safety?

This generation of electric pressure cookers has many built-in safety mechanisms. Even if you forget to add liquid, it’ll shut off and display an error code.

14.How should I store my Instant Pot®?

Unplug it after each use. Store it on the counter, in the cabinet, or wherever you have space. Just be sure to store the inner lid upside down on the inner pot. This way, it’ll be able to air out.

The Recipes

In this cookbook, you’ll find a solid, quality collection of Mexican electric pressure cooker recipes, ones brimming with authentic flavors. All the while, they’re recipes that fully utilize the multifunctional features of the appliance.

REGIONAL CUISINES

Mexican cuisine is hyper-regional and beloved not only in Mexico, but also in many parts of the United States, where Mexican cuisine spreads from border states like Texas to other southwestern states—and well beyond.

MEXICO

In northern and northeastern Mexico (“El Norte”)—an area that includes Baja, Sonora, Chihuahua, and Durango—the cuisine features a bevy of grilled beef dishes mixed with green chile, and quince, which makes its way into desserts. This region is also Mexico’s major cheese producer, turning out queso fresco; Monterey Jack–like ranchero; mild, creamy cuajada; ricotta-esque requesón; semisoft queso menonita (also called Chihuahua cheese); and several varieties of smoky asadero.

Not surprisingly, the Gulf Shore sees its share of fresh seafood, with iconic dishes like lime-laced ceviche and dishes made from red snapper, like huachinango a la vera-cruzana. Here, Afro-Cuban, Spanish, and Creole influences shine.

Likewise, the seafood game is strong along the Yucatán Peninsula, where storied, achiote-laced cochinita pibil also reigns. This area is also marked by the use of habaneros and tropical fruits, among them tamarind, mamey, avocados, bitter oranges, and plums. Often, food is wrapped in banana leaves and cooked in a pit oven. This region’s Mayan food is inflected with influences from Cuba and other Caribbean islands, as well as Middle Eastern, Asian, and European cultures.

On the Pacific shore, Manzanillo fishermen are known for their seafood chowders brimming with squid, oysters, shrimp, clams, and octopus. The Pacific north—Sinaloa, Jalisco, Nayarit, and Colima—are credited with birria (particularly in Guadalajara), as well as menudo and a range of pork dishes.

Meanwhile, moles hail from the Isthmus states, as they rely on the region’s chocolate supply. Oaxacan cuisine is based on staples like corn, chiles, and beans, though it’s fabled for its seven mole varieties: coloradito (little red), negro (black), amarillo (yellow), chichilo (smoky stew), rojo (red), manchamanteles (tablecloth stainer), and verde (green).

Because Puebla’s population is varied, its dishes are distinct from the rest of Mexico. As a result, you’ll encounter roasted peppers stuffed with a mix of nuts, fruits, and ground meat. Central Mexico—and Mexico City, in particular—favors street foods, such as carnitas, tortas, and tacos. Needless to say, the city is known for haute Mexican fare, while at the same time embracing regional dishes from across the country. Beyond that, you’ll also find spots specializing in pre-Hispanic food, including insect-based dishes.

If you particularly love Mexican snacks (antojos), you have Mexico’s central plains to thank, since tacos, tostadas, and quesadillas with salsa and guacamole are particularly beloved in this region.

I welcome you to travel around Mexico and the United States within the pages of this cookbook—no plane ticket required.

UNITED STATES

Southwestern and Tex-Mex cuisine—a fusion of Mexican and American fare—comes from creations of Tejanos and is found most readily (and authentically) throughout Texas and states such as Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada. Expect dishes like chili con carne, hard-shell tacos, and fajitas, as well as ingredients like shredded cheese and flour tortillas.

Cali-Mex: Thank the Mexican state of Baja California in northern Mexico, as well as its large Chinese population, for this distinct regional cuisine. There are dishes from this area you won’t find elsewhere, the sometimes surprising, Baja-style dishes nonetheless loaded with peppers, onions, and chiles.

FEATURES

The recipes in this book were developed to be practical and easy to follow, with clear, concise steps that help you prepare flavorful, healthy favorites in your electric pressure cooker, fuss-free.

TIME

You’ll find useful instructional labels that help you make the most of your pressure cooker’s multifunctional settings and capabilities with ease. This includes prep time, time under pressure, pressure release method, and total time for every pressure cooker recipe.

Regional Map of Mexican Cuisine

Mexican cuisine is highly regional, with some areas focusing on distinct dishes, such as rich moles, fresh-plucked seafood and antojos (snacks).

 

INGREDIENTS

Ingredients lists reflect the everyday items in a Mexican pantry, all of which are relatively easy to find or obtain. Some of the dried-good items, like beans, might already be in your pantry.

INSTRUCTIONS

Step-by-step instructions are easy to follow and clearly indicate cooking settings—just the thing for those who are new to the appliance.

LABELS

I’ve included different labels for different lifestyles and diets, and schedules, too.

30 Minutes or Less: These dishes can be prepared from start to finish within 30 minutes, making them ideal for weeknight dinners.

Kid-Friendly: When you’re looking to feed the whole family—kids included—turn to these all-ages-approved preparations.

Dairy-Free: Whether you’re lactose-intolerant or opt to eat dairy-free, look to this label for pitch-perfect preps throughout the book.

Gluten-Free: Those who are sensitive or allergic to gluten will find plenty of dishes to satisfy their cravings. (Always check ingredient packaging for gluten-free labeling.)

Vegan: This designation refers to satisfying plant-based dishes that are free of meat and animal by-products.

Vegetarian: Want to skip the meat? Many Mexican dishes are vegetable-based. Look for this label to find them in a flash.

TIPS

Look for recipe-specific tips for every recipe. These include what to do with leftovers, ways to repurpose ingredients, ingredient tips, Instant Pot® tidbits, substitution recommendations, and advice on what you can make ahead.

 

 

CLASSIC TOMATILLO AND ÁRBOL CHILE SALSA

 

 

CHAPTER 2

Salsas & Sauces

CALDILLO DE JITOMATE Mexican Tomato Salsa

QUESO BLANCO DIP

CLASSIC TOMATILLO AND ÁRBOL CHILE SALSA

NACHO CHEESE SAUCE

QUESO FUNDIDO A LA CERVEZA Boozy Queso Fundido

SALSA DE CHILE COLORADO Red Chile Salsa

SALSA GEMMA Gemma-Style Salsa

SALSA RANCHERA Ranch-Style Salsa

SPICY SALSA VERDE

 

 

Caldillo de Jitomate

MEXICAN TOMATO SALSA

PREP TIME: 5 minutes * SAUTÉ: 8 minutes * MANUAL: 30 minutes on high pressure * RELEASE: Quick * TOTAL TIME: 45 minutes * MAKES: about 8 cups

DAIRY-FREE

GLUTEN-FREE

VEGAN

 

A common misconception about Mexican food is that all Mexican salsas have to be super spicy. This is not the case at all. For example, this Caldillo de Jitomate is a mild tomato salsa that can be spooned over everything from tamales and scrambled eggs to entomatadas (tomato enchiladas) and burritos. Or you can stir this into your favorite soups like albóndigas. This recipe yields a large batch of salsa, which you can store for up to a week in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 medium white onion, diced

3 garlic cloves, minced

3 pounds Roma tomatoes, quartered

1 teaspoon coarse salt, plus more for seasoning (optional)

2 bay leaves

1 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano, crushed

1.Set the Instant Pot® to Sauté and adjust to More for high. Heat the vegetable oil in the pot, then add the onion and sauté for 3 to 5 minutes, or until translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for an additional 30 to 60 seconds. Add the tomatoes, season with the salt, and sauté for about 2 minutes. Add ½ cup water, the bay leaves, and oregano.

2.Lock the lid into place and set the steam release valve to sealed. Select Manual and set the timer for 30 minutes on high.

3.When cooking is complete, quick release the pressure. Unlock and remove the lid.

4.Remove the bay leaves. Using an immersion blender, purée the salsa. Season with more salt, if necessary.

Freezer tip: Too much salsa? Allow it to cool completely, then divide into 1-cup portions and freeze in airtight containers. You can add the frozen salsa to soups or allow it to defrost overnight in refrigerator.

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The Everyday Mexican Instant Pot Cookbook is the definitive Instant Pot cookbook for real Mexican home cooking made fast and simple.

The Instant Pot is not your abuelita’s pressure cooker. In the first official Instant Pot cookbook for Mexican cuisine, The Everyday Mexican Instant Pot Cookbook captures the classic flavor of Mexican food with the speed and simplicity of your Instant Pot for everyday meals from the heart of Mexico .

This Mexican cookbook showcases a rich variety of regional cuisine, with over 80 recipes that include everything from Roasted Poblano Pepper Tamales to Beef Shank Barbacoa to Mexican Bread Pudding. To enhance the convenience of cooking with your Instant Pot, each recipe in this Mexican cookbook features easy-to-find ingredients and simple, step-by-step instructions to make flavorful Mexican dishes at home.

The Everyday Mexican Instant Pot Cookbook serves up flavorful dishes in a flash, with:

  • Instant Pot 101 that gives home cooks a definitive resource on how to best use your Instant Pot, complete with timing charts for major food groups.
  • Over 80 Recipes for real recipes that can be made in an hour or less from start to finish.
  • Directional labels that remove the guesswork from electric pressure cooking with clear indications for prep time, time under pressure, pressure release method, and total time for every recipe.

Bring the fiesta to your table in an instant with the most comprehensive collection of authentic Mexican recipes from The Everyday Mexican Instant Pot Cookbook.

Comments:

This book has a badge on the front that it’s authorized by Instant Pot, so you can be pretty confident that they’re going to work well in your machine. I have both an Instant Pot and another brand electric pressure cooker, and these would be fine in either. As I flipped through the book, I found plenty of appealing recipes to flag. I laughed when I saw Chile Relleno Chowder. That’s a pretty creative way to get chile rellenos in your Instant Pot. The flavors are really nice and it’s a healthier take on the dish, since there’s no breading and frying. You char 8 poblanos on the stove, then peel and seed them. Potatoes add nice texture and some thickness to the chowder, and there’s garlic and onion playing in the background. There’s a whole pack of queso fresco crumbled in and the bowls are topped with cojack. My kids loved it. Some other recipes that caught my eye: Queso Blanco Dip * Queso Fundido a la Cerveza (Queso with Beer) * Albondigas en Caldillo (meatball soup in tomato broth) * Tamales de Rajas (roasted poblano pepper tamales) * Barbacoa de Pollo (chicken barbacoa) * Caldo Tlalpeno (Tlalpeno-style chicken and chickpea soup) * Pollo a la Crema con Rajas (poblano chicken) * Asado de Boda (Mexican wedding pork roast) * Beer-Braised Beef Roast * Pork Carnitas * Pork Chile Colorado * Gramm’s Famous Shredded Beef Chile Colorado Tamales * Conchinita Pibil *I received a copy to explore and share my thoughts.

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