Good Clean Food by Gary Null Ph.D [book store]


  • Full Title : Good Clean Food: Shopping Smart to Avoid GMOs, rBGH, and Products That May Cause Cancer and Other Diseases
  • Autor: Gary Null Ph.D
  • Print Length: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing; 1 edition
  • Publication Date: June 1, 2013
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1632206382
  • ISBN-13: 978-1616088217
  • Download File Format: epub

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Did you know that American milk and meat are banned in Europe because of the health risks they pose? Or that one in three items on supermarket shelves contains genetically modified ingredients? How about that forty pesticides in use today have been linked to certain types of cancer?

Between GMOs, hormones, and pesticides, it sometimes feels like our food has become so artificial that shopping smart is impossible. How can we know for sure that the food we buy isn’t putting us at risk? If you’ve got questions, this practical, positive guide has answers. In it, leading public health advocate Samuel Epstein, MD, and coauthor Beth Leibson provide all of the information you need to make the best food choices for you and your family—in language you don’t need a PhD in biology to understand.

You’ll learn how to choose wisely when shopping for:
• Beef
• Chicken
• Milk and dairy
• Eggs
• Soy
• Corn
• Snack foods
• Potatoes
• Lettuce
• Strawberries
• Grapes
• Baby food
• And much more

Before your next trip to the supermarket, make sure you read this helpful handbook—and you’ll be on your way to a lifetime of good clean food.

 

Review

“Dr. Samuel Epstein, one of our most insightful and authoritative voices on avoidable causes of cancer, has teamed up with health writer Beth Leibson to once again present persuasive and well-documented evidence on the hidden health risks of everyday consumer products. . . . As we sit back and witness food allergies, asthma, diabetes, weakened immune systems, and a host of other disorders and illnesses reach epidemic proportions in American children, Good Clean Food should be required reading for every parent and school teacher.” (Gary Null, PhD, author of The Complete Encyclopedia of Natural Healing and host of The Gary Null Show)

About the Author

Samuel Epstein, MD is an internationally recognized authority on avoidable causes of cancer. The author of more than twenty books and 270 peer-reviewed articles, he has served as president of the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health as well as the Rachel Carson Council, professor emeritus of environmental and occupational medicine at the University of Illinois School of Public Health, and chairman of the Cancer Prevention Coalition. He lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Beth Leibson is a freelance writer and editor for health-related publications. She is the author of I’m Too Young to Have Breast Cancer!, which tells the stories of sixteen women under forty facing diagnosis, treatment, and life after the disease. She holds a master’s in public policy from Duke University and a master’s of fine arts in creative writing from Emerson College. She lives with her children in New York City.

Gary Null, PhD,is an internationally renowned expert in the field of health and nutrition, the author of more than seventy books on healthy living, and the director of more than one hundred critically acclaimed full-feature documentaries. He is the host of The Gary Null Show, the country’s longest-running nationally syndicated health radio talk show. He lives in New York City.

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Keywords

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of the new generation of star chefs, from Samuel and Samantha Clarke to Jamie Oliver.

Introduction

Word spread. People started arriving at our door. A woman from our local allotment began to bring her surplus sorrel in the early spring. In April, a friend would pick stinging nettles by the bag-full from his farm in Hampshire. Other enthusiasts appeared with sea kale from the south coast beaches. Later in the year our builder exchanged the huge puffball mushrooms that grow near his house for bottles of Chianti Classico. When people realised we at the River Cafe were interested in fresh, unusual, wild produce they wanted to participate.

Our passion for vegetables and fruit in season has been at the heart of the River Cafe since we first opened in 1987. Every day, outside the kitchen, we pick from our organic garden many varieties of basil, marjoram and mint, and interesting leaves such as purslane, cicoria, and trevise to use in our recipes. And the simple pleasure of all this, of fresh, seasonal eating, is behind River Cafe Cook Book Green, our third cookbook.

Like the others, it is heavily influenced by our love of Italy, our many visits over many years, and our growing appreciation of the glorious variety of Italian food. All cooking starts in the market, the market reflects where you are, and the season around you. There is the joy in April when the first delicate broad beans arrive; that rich day in October when every stall is loaded with wild mushrooms gathered only that morning; the gentle sadness of biting into that last fresh cherry knowing that soon the brief season is over.

Over the years we have worked with our suppliers from New Covent Garden, encouraging them to bring Italian market produce to London. Now lorries arrive laden with trevise from Verona, artichokes from Rome, borlotti beans from Puglia. These wonderful vegetables are slowly spreading throughout Britain and more and more greengrocers and supermarkets are selling them. If you have a garden you should experiment with growing your own. If not, try farmers’ markets, pick-your-own farms and organic box schemes. But above all develop a relationship with your greengrocer, urging him to supply interesting varieties.

We thought the moment was ripe for a book of this kind, in which we have divided the year not simply into seasons but into months. We wanted to show how specific vegetables are used in specific months for specific recipes – romanesco artichokes for deep-frying whole, the violettas for slicing finely to be eaten raw in salads; how to choose different varieties of tomatoes – cherry vines for fresh pasta sauces, plums for slow-cooked ones and the huge yellow tomatoes for rubbing on to bruschetta. There are recipes using wild ingredients, stinging nettles, sorrel and thistles – for flavouring pastas or simply combining to make a delicious insalata di campo.

Our cooking has become increasingly focused on the garden and its produce. In the summer we make fresh pasta with olives and tomatoes and a risotto of summer squash; in October when the chestnuts appear we put them in soup with celeriac; in the winter we eat salads of puntarelle with anchovies and vin santo, and for Christmas we make a cake with crystallised clementines; in the spring we make a raw artichoke pesto to go with homemade tagliarini.

These are not complicated recipes, and our message is simple too: good cooking is about fresh seasonal ingredients, organic whenever possible, used thoughtfully. It is something the Italians have always known and we hope that with this book you will share our pleasure in rediscovering this simple truth.

Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers London 2000

january

cime di rapa

pasta

penne with cime di rapa and pancetta

ravioli with cime di rapa and ricotta

polenta

fried polenta with cime di rapa

chickpeas

antipasto

deep-fried chickpea slices

vegetable

chickpeas, potatoes and anchovies

antipasto

chickpea pancake with rosemary

dried porcini mushrooms

antipasto

braised porcini and spinach

risotto

porcini and tomato risotto

vegetable

baked porcini and potatoes

soup

porcini and clam soup

parsley

pasta

spaghetti with parsley, pancetta and parmesan

antipasto

parsley, squid and cannellini bean stew

savoy cabbage

soup

savoy cabbage soup with anchovy and ricotta crostini

salad

savoy cabbage and bresaola salad

risotto

savoy cabbage, pancetta and fontina risotto

vanilla

pudding

vanilla risotto ice-cream

vanilla and chocolate sorbet

vernazza cake

cime di rapa

Cime di rapa, broccoletti di rapa and rapini are the Italian names for this delicious green winter vegetable, part of the turnip and cabbage, or Brassica, family. It is grown for its greens, which form like sprouting broccoli. It tastes bitter and peppery, a little like turnip. Cime di rapa should be picked before the shoots have started to flower, and when the leaves are still green and tender.

Even in Italy this vegetable was only found in particular regions ten years ago. Now it is found in shops and markets all over the country. In Britain it is still hardly known, and is only available in a few speciality vegetable shops. We are starting to grow it on a small scale from Italian seed, and hope that in a few years it will become established as the market widens.

Look for bright green, tender leaves on crisp strong stalks, with tightly closed flower heads. Discard the tough or blemished outer leaves and cut the younger leaves and flower stems from the main stalk.

The leaves of cime are fine and cook very quickly, like spinach. Drain them well and season with extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper. In Rome, plates of cime di rapa cooked in this simple way are always part of antipasti di verdura.

penne with cime di rapa and pancetta

penne con cime di rapa e pancetta

for 6

2 kg cime di rapa

400 g penne rigate

150 g pancetta, finely sliced, then cut into matchsticks

3 tablespoons olive oil

3 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped

1 × 800 g tin peeled plum tomatoes

Maldon salt and freshly ground black pepper

zest of 1 washed lemon

2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

extra virgin olive oil

150 g Pecorino staginata cheese, freshly grated

Heat the olive oil in a thick-bottomed frying pan and fry the garlic with the pancetta until lightly browned. Add the tomatoes, half their juices and a little salt, and cook over a moderate heat, stirring to prevent sticking, for 20–30 minutes.

Prepare the cime by discarding the tough stalks and outer leaves. Keep the budding flower shoots and the smaller tender leaves. Wash well and roughly chop. Cook the cime in a large saucepan of boiling salted water for 5 minutes, then drain well. Put in a bowl, add the lemon zest, parsley and plenty of extra virgin olive oil. Season with salt and pepper.

Separately bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil, and cook the penne for the stated time, usually about 8 minutes. Drain and mix into the tomato sauce. Test for seasoning. Toss around to allow the penne to be coated, then stir in the cime. Serve with the freshly grated Pecorino.

ravioli with cime di rapa and ricotta

ravioli di cime di rapa e ricotta

for 6

1.5 kg cime di rapa

Ligurian Basic Pasta (see here)

Maldon salt and freshly ground black pepper

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped

1 dried red chilli, crumbled

250 g buffalo ricotta

150 g Pecorino staginata cheese, freshly grated

plain flour for dusting

extra virgin olive oil

For the filling, remove the tough stalks and outer tough leaves from the cime. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil, and cook the cime for 5–8 minutes. It should be tender but still bright green. Drain, cool and chop quite finely. Heat the olive oil in a thick-bottomed saucepan, and soften the garlic. Add the chilli, cime, salt and pepper, stir briefly to combine the flavours, then remove from the heat and cool.

Beat the ricotta lightly with a fork, and season. Mix in the cime and 3 tablespoons grated Pecorino. Cover and place in the fridge.

Dust your work surface with flour. Roll the pasta dough in the machine as outlined here. Make long thin strips the width of your pasta machine, then cut into manageable lengths. Place half dessertspoons of filling at 7 cm intervals down the middle of each strip. Fold the pasta over the filling and gently press around each mound to seal the pasta. Cut into ravioli of about 4 cm square, using a serrated pasta cutter that seals as it cuts. Place the ravioli on to floured trays until ready for cooking.

Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil. Cook the ravioli, uncovered, in batches. They will take about 5 minutes. Drain well, and serve with freshly grated Pecorino and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

fried polenta with cime di rapa

polenta fritta con cime di rapa

for 6

1.5 kg cime di rapa, washed, tough leaves and stalks removed

4 tablespoons olive oil

3 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced

2 dried red chillies, crumbled

Maldon salt and freshly ground black pepper

anchovy and polenta fritters

450 g Polenta (see here), made without butter and Parmesan

10 g (1 sachet) granular dried yeast, dissolved in 80 ml warm milk

300 g plain flour, plus extra for dusting

sunflower oil for deep-frying

12 salted anchovies, prepared (see here)

Pull away any skin from the top of the polenta and discard. Mash the polenta in a bowl, then add the yeast and milk. Sieve in the flour and mix together to form a soft dough. Cover and leave in a warm place to rise for 1 hour.

Heat the olive oil in a thick-bottomed saucepan, add the garlic and fry until beginning to brown. Add the chilli and washed cime, season generously with salt and pepper, cover and cook until tender, about 8–10 minutes.

Preheat the sunflower oil to 180°C/350°F.

Scoop up tablespoon-sized pieces of the dough, and push an anchovy fillet into the centre of each. Roll around in plain flour to form golfballs. Place in the preheated oil and deep-fry, turning to allow the balls to brown on all sides. Serve the cime with the polenta fritters.

chickpeas

Chickpeas are one of the most important pulses in the world. They grow in southern Italy, or anywhere without frost. An ancient pulse that originated in the Near East, the chickpea is easy to grow, high in protein, and has become part of the ‘cibo di povero’ of many countries.

Chickpeas are harvested in the late summer and dried for use from autumn through to spring. The best chickpeas to buy are always the new season’s. In Italy, they sell two or three different sizes of chickpea. We choose the largest, to cook whole, to include in soups or to eat on their own with extra virgin olive oil and fresh chilli. The smaller chickpeas are ground into flour and used to make Farinata and Panisse, the Ligurian street food specialities.

Soak chickpeas for 48 hours before cooking. Add a large peeled potato, a whole tomato, a couple of fresh chillies, some garlic cloves and a green celery stalk to the cooking water. Never add salt. The starch from the potato will help soften the skins of the chickpeas as they cook. New season’s will take up to 1½ hours; older chickpeas can take up to 4 hours, and may not be worth it even then! If the skins seem to be tough, allow the chickpeas to cool in their cooking liquid, then rub them within the palms of your hand. The skins should flake off and float. Skim and discard. Only add salt after cooking. Keep in their cooking liquid when storing.

Tinned chickpeas are usually good, but we always rinse off the liquid before use.

deep-fried chickpea slices

panisse

Serve these fried chickpea slices from Liguria with drinks or as part of an antipasti.

for 6–8

300 g new season chickpea flour

1 litre warm water

Maldon salt

sunflower oil for deep-frying

Sieve the chickpea flour into a large bowl and slowly pour in the warm water, whisking all the time to make sure that no lumps form. Add 1 tablespoon salt.

Pour into a medium, thick-bottomed saucepan, and heat, stirring, until the mixture comes to the boil. Reduce the heat and continue to cook, stirring as much as you can, as it will become very thick. Cook for 40–50 minutes or until the mixture comes away from the sides of the pan, just like polenta. Spoon on to a flat plate, to a thickness of about 1–2 cm, and leave to cool and set firm.

Preheat the oil to 190°C/375°F. Cut the panisse into finger-like slices and deep-fry in the hot oil until golden. Drain on kitchen paper and serve sprinkled with salt.

chickpeas, potatoes and anchovies

ceci e patate con acciughe

for 6

200 g dried chickpeas, soaked for 48 hours

500 g medium potatoes (Roseval), peeled

2 large fresh red chillies, kept whole

10 garlic cloves, peeled and kept whole

1 whole head celery, with leaves

3 tomatoes

Maldon salt and freshly ground black pepper

8 salted anchovies, prepared (see here)

1 branch of fresh rosemary

juice of 2 lemons

extra virgin olive oil

Wash the chickpeas, put them into a large saucepan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil, skimming the surface. Add 2 potatoes to the pot, the chillies, garlic, 3 green outside celery stalks, and the tomatoes. Turn the heat down and simmer gently for 1½-2 hours or until the chickpeas are soft. Make sure they are covered with water at all times. Remove the tough celery stalks. Remove and discard the skin from the chillies and tomatoes, and return the flesh and seeds to the pot.

Cut the remaining potatoes into quarters. Put in a separate saucepan with the celery heart, cut into quarters, and half the chickpeas. Pour in the chickpea liquor, add salt and bring to the boil. Lower the heat and simmer gently until the potatoes are cooked. Roughly mash the potato and chickpeas together in the pan, allowing them to take up the liquid, so that the dish becomes thick and soupy in consistency. Add to this the whole chickpeas, and stir to combine. Test for seasoning.

Chop the anchovies finely, and put in a small bowl. Strip the rosemary leaves from the stalks and chop finely – you need about 2 tablespoons. Immediately stir the rosemary into the anchovies, with enough lemon juice to liquefy. Then slowly stir in enough extra virgin olive oil to make a thick sauce. Season with pepper. Pour over the chickpeas.

chickpea pancake with rosemary

farinata al rosmarino

The standard Ligurian farinata pans are thick, round, flat copper pans, lined with zinc. They are roughly 40 cm in diameter. You can use a thick-bottomed, stainless-steel frying pan, but it must have an ovenproof handle. If using a frying pan, you can make the farinata in batches.

for 6

300 g chickpea flour

1 litre tepid water

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 tablespoon Maldon salt

extra virgin olive oil

2 sprigs fresh rosemary, leaves picked from the stalks

Put the water into a large bowl. Gently pour in the chickpea flour, whisking to avoid lumps. Add the pepper and salt, stir, and allow to sit in a warm place for at least 2 hours.

Preheat the oven to 230°C/450°F/Gas 8.

Remove the foam from the top of the batter and stir in 110 ml olive oil. Pour a further tablespoon of oil into the farinata pan, or frying pan, and put into the oven until the oil is just smoking. Quickly remove and pour in the chickpea batter. The farinata should be very thin – no more than 1 cm deep. Sprinkle the rosemary leaves over the top, and return to the oven. Bake for about 10 minutes until the top is brown and crisp and the middle is still soft.

dried porcini mushrooms

Porcini mushrooms dry very effectively, and in their dried form are very important in the Italian larder. They are used throughout the year, not as a substitute for the fresh mushroom, but as a separate valid ingredient in recipes as a seasoning. Dried porcini have a more intense flavour than fresh, and a little goes a long way.

The quality of dried porcini depends on the state of the fresh porcini when picked. Large firm mushrooms with their caps still partially enclosing the stem are best. Sliced finely through the cap and stem, the pieces are laid out, often on newspaper, to dry in the sun. Dehydration concentrates the earthy fragrance.

Dried porcini are usually sold in transparent packets: look for pale cream-coloured stems and light brown caps. Thickly sliced, darker coloured porcini are oven-dried, which seems to affect the flavour. These are usually much cheaper, but not really worth it. If you cannot distinguish the shape of the slice, and there are lots of small pieces and crumbs, they may not be porcini.

Ideally, buy your dried porcini when you are in Italy. Many shops sell them loose, they are cheaper, and you will have a selection.

braised porcini and spinach

porcini brasati con spinaci

for 6

50 g dried porcini, soaked in 200 ml hot water for 20 minutes

1.5 kg spinach, washed

Maldon salt and freshly ground black pepper

olive oil

3 garlic cloves, peeled and finely sliced

2 dried red chillies, crumbled

500 g large flat field mushrooms, peeled and sliced 1 cm thick

juice of 1 lemon

extra virgin olive oil

Drain the porcini, keeping the liquid. Strain this through a fine sieve. Rinse the porcini under running cold water to get rid of any remaining grit, and roughly chop.

Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil, add the spinach and cook for 3 minutes. Drain.

Heat 4 tablespoons of olive oil in a large, thick-bottomed frying pan. Add the garlic and just let it soften, then add the porcini and dried chilli. Gently fry for 10 minutes, adding a couple of spoons of the porcini liquid to keep the porcini moist. When the porcini have become soft, let the liquid evaporate, leaving just the oil, then add the mushroom slices. Fry them with the porcini for 5 minutes; they will become very dark. Add a little more liquid to the pan, just to moisten the mushrooms. Season generously with salt and pepper, turn down the heat and simmer until the mushrooms are cooked.

Stir in the spinach and adjust the seasoning. Serve with a little lemon juice and extra virgin olive oil.

porcini and tomato risotto

risotto ai porcini e pomodoro

for 6

100 g dried porcini, soaked in 250 ml hot water for 20 minutes

600 g tinned peeled plum tomatoes, drained

1.2 litres chicken stock (see here)

Maldon salt and freshly ground black pepper

100 g butter

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 small red onions, peeled and finely chopped

inner white heart of 1 head celery, finely chopped

3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

2 dried red chillies, crumbled

300 g carnaroli rice

2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

freshly grated Parmesan

Drain the porcini, keeping the liquid. Strain this through a fine sieve. Rinse the porcini under running cold water to get rid of any grit, dry well, and roughly chop. Heat the stock and check the seasoning.

Heat half the butter and the olive oil in a large thick-bottomed saucepan. Gently fry the onion and celery until soft and beginning to colour. Add the porcini pieces, garlic and chilli, and continue to fry to combine and soften for 5–6 minutes. Stir in the rice and push around to coat each grain with the vegetables. When the rice becomes opaque, add the tomatoes and 2 teaspoons salt. Stir and cook for a few minutes to allow the liquid to evaporate. Turn the heat down, and start adding the stock ladle by ladle, interspersed with the porcini liquid, not adding the next ladleful until the last has

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