Guy on Fire: 130 Recipes for Adventures in Outdoor Cooking by Guy Fieri, EPUB, 006224471X

February 24, 2017

 Guy on Fire: 130 Recipes for Adventures in Outdoor Cooking by Guy Fieri, EPUB, 006224471X

Guy on Fire: 130 Recipes for Adventures in Outdoor Cooking by Guy Fieri

  • Print Length: 352 Pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Cookbooks
  • Publication Date: May 6, 2014
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00FJ350AS
  • ISBN-10: 006224471X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062244710
  • File Format: EPUB

 

”Preview”

Contents

 

DEDICATION

WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT

INTRODUCING THE OUTDOOR ARSENAL

THE EQUIPMENT RUNDOWN

THE RULES OF THE BARBECUE

 

1. BACKYARD BASH

Crispy Zucchini Planks with Parmesan and Aioli

Roasted Garlic, Sriracha, and Chipotle Aiolis

Homemade Hot Sauce

Pimento Cheese–Stuffed Jalapeños

Cast-Iron Beef Tenderloin with Blackberry Jalapeño Sauce

GET TO KNOW A BUTCHER

California Brick Chicken with Apricot-Mint Chimichurri

Salt and Pepper Spareribs with Romesco Sauce

SETTING THE BAR ON SPARERIBS

Grilled Lamb Chops with Olive-Orange Tapenade

Miso Side of Salmon with Pickled Carrots and Daikon

Lava Rock Shrimp with Honey-Lime Chipotle Sauce and Mango Jicama Salsa

Smoky Bean Chili

Guy’s Straight-Up Burgers with a Pig Patty and Donkey Sauce

Black and Blue Burger with Bacon and Avocado

Philly Cheese Steak Egg Rolls

Turkey and Blistered Green Chile Burger Melt

THE FIERI FAMILY TURKEY TAKEOVER

Seared Tuna Burgers with Sesame and Spicy Mayo

“Danger Dogs”—Bacon-Wrapped Hot Dogs with Spicy Fruit Relish

Soft-Shell Crab Sandwiches with Homemade Slaw and Tartar Sauce

Grilled Baby Artichokes

Ahi Poke and Toasted Seaweed Salad

Charred Octopus and White Bean Salad

OCTOPUS PREP

Salted Bourbon Caramel Milkshake

Blueberry Peach Crisp

Rock and Roll Mai Tai

The Big Island Punch

Raspberry Picante Paloma Pitchers

 

2. EXTREME TAILGATING

Bacon-Wrapped Scallops Glazed with Maple Butter

Grilled Chicken Wings Two Ways

BEE STING WINGS

Andouille-Stuffed Pork Loin with Creole Mustard

TRADITIONAL OVEN COOKING METHOD

St. Louis Ribs with Tequila BBQ Sauce

ON RIBS: BABY BACK VS. ST. LOUIS

Korean Glazed Sticky Short Ribs

THE SECRET OF THE SILVERSKIN

Crispy Asian-Style Fried Chicken

Apricot Glazed Chicken Thighs with Pickled Red Onions

Brazilian Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Thighs with Peri Peri Sauce

Spicy Cracked Chile Crab

Tri-Tip Dip Sandwich with Horseradish Mayo

Grilled Sausage Kebabs Three Ways

Grilled Lamb Sandwiches with Harissa Mayo and Quick-Pickled Cucumbers

GUIDO HAD A LITTLE LAMB

Lamb and Feta Sliders with Mint Tzatziki

Grilled Tequila Lime Fish Tacos with Cilantro-Lime Crema

Fresh Corn and Flour Tortillas

COMPETITION BARBECUE BY THE MOTLEY QUE

AMERICAN ROYAL: INVITATIONAL AND OPEN

MOTLEY QUE CREW BBQ TIMELINE

MOTLEY QUE & A

RAMBLINGS FROM RILEY ON THE ROYAL

Motley Que Championship Pork Butt

Motley Que 2011 American Royal Ribs

Motley Que American Royal Invitational First Place Chicken

Motley Que American Royal Brisket

BBQ Brisket Hash with Roasted Red Pepper Hollandaise

Red Wine Beef Stroganoff with Buttered Noodles

MY BEEF WITH LORI’S NOODLES

Smoked Chicken Tacos with Roasted Red Pepper Salsa

Smoked Chicken, Sausage, and Andouille Gumbo

Chicken, Pork, and Sausage Jambalaya

 

3. AT THE LAKE

Chicken-Fried Steak with Mushroom Gravy

BBQ MVP

“WHATEVER YOU HAVE” BREADING

Bone-In Double-Cut Pork Chops with Brie and Apples

Pancakes, Sweet and Savory

Maple Nut Granola and Other Variations

Queso Fundido with Fresh Tortilla Chips

Beef Ribs with Orange BBQ Sauce

Moroccan Chicken Tagine with Spicy Tahini Sauce

CAMPFIRE DUTCH OVENS

HOW TO TREATA YO PITA

Chorizo and Polenta Casserole with Crispy Kale

Volcano Chicken with Maui Onion Straws

Chicken Paillard Salad with Mustardy Vinaigrette

Lamb Curry with Chickpeas and Spinach

Spicy Carbonara with Pancetta and Parm

Pork Chile Verde

Baked Ziti

Blackened Trout with Shrimp Sauce

TROUT FOR AUNT PATTY

HUNTER’S FIRST TROUT

Roasted Shrimp and Crab Etouffée

ROUX THE DAY

Catfish (or Any Fresh-Caught Fish) and Peppers en Papillote

THE CATFISH CRUCIFIXION

Turkey and Quinoa–Stuffed Peppers with Roasted Tomatillo Avocado Sauce

Lamb Barbacoa Tacos

BANANA LEAVES

Farro Salad with Citrus Vinaigrette

Chipotle Corn Salad with Grilled Bacon

Wild Mushroom Risotto

Roasted Poblano Skillet Cornbread

Banana Split with Rum-Roasted Pineapple

Pineapple Upside-Down Cake with Rum Blueberries

Bourbon Blueberry and Peach Cobbler

Guy’s Lemongrass-Ginger Julep

 

4. CAMPGROUND COOKIN’

Smoked Salmon Hash

Ham and Grits with Red-Eye Gravy

Stout-Braised Short Ribs with Pearl Barley

IF YOU WOULDN’T DRINK IT, DON’T COOK WITH IT

Zing Zang Flank Steak

SKEWERS

Warm Taco Salad with Spicy, Smoky Ranch

Green Onion and Flank Steak Yakitori

Crispy Veal Schnitzel with Garlic-Onion Gravy

Grilled Huli Huli–Style Chicken

THE LEGEND OF THE HULI HULI CHICKENFEST

Slamma Jamma Chicken Parmigiana

CHICKEN PARM AND ELVIS DURAN, Z100

Pastrami Burger with Caraway Coleslaw

CLASSIC KATZ’S

White Turkey and Bean Chili

Camping Sandwiches

CAMPING SANDWICH COMBOS

TOASTIES

Waldorf Chicken Salad Panini

Pork Katsu Sandwich with Bacon Mayonnaise

Funky Mash

Camping Baked Potatoes with Herbed Sour Cream

Roasted Vegetable Camping Pouches

HEAVY-DUTY ALUMINUM FOIL

Basmati Rice Pilaf

RICE RULES

Old-School Baked Beans with Molasses

CAMPFIRE BAKING IN A CAST-IRON DUTCH OVEN

Griddle Hominy Cakes with Guacamole

Camping S’more Madness

 

5. HOLIDAY COOKOUT

Caramel Apple French Toast

Crab Cakes with Southwestern Relish

Fire-Roasted Tomato Salsa

Black Bean Avocado Salsa with Corn

Crunch Crazy Asparagus Spears

Fire-Roasted Margherita Pizza

MY FIRST WOOD-FIRED OVEN

Spicy Ahi Tuna Flatbread

Asian BBQ Pork Belly Flatbread

Shaved Brussels Sprout and Bacon Pizza

Grilled Corn Chowder with Chipotle Cream and Spicy Saltines

Holiday Minestrone with Chicken Meatballs

THE GREATEST FOOD FIGHT FRANCE HAS EVER SEEN!

Chicken Posole

Bouillabaisse with Seared Halibut and Garlicky Rouille

Santa Maria Tri-Tip with Achiote Oil

Brandied Green Peppercorn Hanger Steak

A TALE OF SURVIVAL, NO SNACKS ALLOWED

Mac-n-Cheese with Roasted Chicken and Bacon

Grilled Lamb with Mint Mojo Sauce and Homemade Herbed Pita

Jimbo’s Hambo with Fruit Salsa

Prosciutto, Provolone, and Pepper–Stuffed Pork Chops (AKA “Triple P” Pork Chops)

Turkey Cordon Bleu

Skirt Steak Fajitas

Thanksgiving Panini

Green Bean Casserole with Homemade Mushroom Gravy and Fried Shallots

Smoky Black Beans and Chorizo

Creamy Cheddar Brussels Sprout Gratin

Cheesy Twice-Baked Potatoes

Peas and Prosciutto

Roasted Spiced Cauliflower and Chickpeas

Spicy Red Lentil Salad with Pickled Vegetables

Roasted Roots and Radiatore Pasta Salad

Shaved Fennel and Arugula Salad with Grapefruit

RECIPES BY CATEGORY

GUY THANKS

INDEX

ALSO BY GUY FIERI

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

CREDITS

COPYRIGHT

ABOUT THE PUBLISHER

 

 

What It’s All About

 

Here we go . . . cookbook number five . . . something I’ll tell you I never imagined happening for me. We’ve traveled the country together, back, forth, and back again with three installments of the Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives series. What a trip! And I feel like we’ve walked down memory lane together through Guy Fieri Food, which at the time, I figured, encompassed my entire life (in and out of the kitchen) in one big funky tattooed behemoth of a book. But here we are, back at it, and let me tell you, we’re just getting started.

When it came time to start writing book number five, I really had to chew on it for bit. What do I write about? We’ve covered so much. But then, on second (or umpteenth) thought, it came to me: I just need to write what I know. I can write about my love of funky joints . . . check. I can write about my life story in the kitchen . . . check. And now, I can write about how I cook on an everyday basis with my family with my friends and with anyone who’s lookin’ to get down and dirty and make a great meal, anywhere, anytime.

Here in California, no doubt, we’re blessed with great weather. So, since I first set off on my culinary path, I’ve always been about getting outside and cookin’ it up in the great outdoors. Of course, I dig a great summer grill session in the sunshine. But I’m talking about much more than that, cooking as an adventure. From the simple backyard BBQ to tailgating to throwing a Dutch oven over the campfire, cooking outdoors is an art that’s often either taken for granted or sometimes, very unfairly, overlooked as too difficult.

As humans, we love to be outside . . . we’re meant to be that way. I mean, that’s where we invented fire in the first place! As kids, we play outside. As adults, we vacation outside. We go to restaurants and ask to eat outside. So, let’s take the mystery out of cooking outside. Hot, cold, windy, wet . . . I say bring it on. Got fire? We can do this.

Whether it’s been as a kid packing into the Marble Mountains and wondering how on Earth my dad was able to bust out chicken and dumplings over a campfire or trying to figure out how to create the biggest, baddest tailgate party Raider Nation has ever seen, I’ve always been about making it happen outside. Having space. Doing the unexpected. And making it delicious.

You want to cook up a great summer grilling party? I’ve got you covered. Want to take the family camping but don’t want to have to live on granola bars? Read on. Got a hankerin’ for some real-deal BBQ? Check it out. Time to throw down the mother of all tailgate parties? Let’s get ’er done!

Guy on Fire is about helping you master your own outdoor cooking adventures while you maximize your outdoor entertaining. Learn to be properly prepped and geared up, understand a few new (or super old school) cooking techniques, grab some key tricks of the trade, and then take a stab at some of my tried-and-true recipes that at first glance may not even seem like they are doable outdoors. But trust me, every dish in this book is something that I’ve busted out under the open sky, and I’m as excited about the stories that I’ve created making these dishes as I am about the food.

You don’t have to live in the land of eternal sunshine to love cooking outside. Let me show you how to make awesome food happen anywhere, anytime, and all in the great outdoors. It’s what I know. Now, let’s get FIRED UP!

Love, Peace & Taco Grease,

 

 

“Ryder, this is where it all starts.”

 

 

Introducing the Outdoor Arsenal

 

Rustic cooking in your backyard, at a tailgate, in a rented cabin on a lake, or around a campfire doesn’t have to mean dumbed-down or second-rate cuisine, and the first key to that is preparedness. Get the right arsenal together and you’re on your way. Here I’ve compiled a rundown of some of the most useful equipment for outdoor culinary adventures.

Don’t be afraid. While I’ve been known to haul all of the things on this list with me on monster camping trips, that’s not necessary, and depending on whether you’re cooking at a campground, in a trailer, or just in the backyard, what you need on hand will change. Use this list as a guide and to help you remember what to bring once you’ve planned your menus and studied your recipes.

A high level of confidence in your equipment will relieve you of a significant amount of stress while cooking or entertaining outdoors. You’re entering an uncontrolled environment, and the elements can be against you. If you find yourself in a strong wind with dirt blowing around, struggling to work with a bunch of flimsy utensils and not enough heat on your fire, you may wish you just packed a sandwich. So, don’t go out and buy the cheapest spatula or tongs specifically for camping or the occasional backyard grilling just because you think you’re only going to use it twice a year. I can tell you from experience that it’s always better to have one really good sharp chef’s knife than two or three dull ones. You can build a set of quality equipment for the outdoors over time, but in the meantime go ahead and bring your trusted, familiar tools from home so you can prep the right way.

The flip side of this argument is that there’s nothing more frustrating than losing your tools in the shuffle. Therefore, when we take stuff up to our cabin at the lake, we mark all those tools with zip ties around their handles so that they always make it back home instead of getting left in the cabin tool drawer.

Bottom line: Sturdy, reliable equipment sets you up for a positive culinary experience. Cheap does not always pay off.

 

 

THE EQUIPMENT RUNDOWN

 

Camping Stoves

The little camping stoves with the canister attached that looks like a spray paint can are nice for an omelet station at a buffet at the Ritz Carlton, but the type that I recommend are high BTU (British thermal units) camping stoves that typically have two or three burners and legs to stand on. These stoves are critical because they’re sturdy and more windproof, their legs allow them to create their own platform, and they can handle more than one pot. Just remember, if you don’t have a good burner, you don’t have the option of going to the neighbors’ house to use their stove.

 

 

Barbecues

 

GAS GRILLS

The best part of a gas grill is its reliability and consistency. There’s a wide range of power, but the higher the BTUs, the better. Having a grill with more than one zone is also helpful. If your only choice is on or off, it’s difficult to do more complex types of cooking that require different temperature zones. With three to five knobs, you have the ability to shut down some areas and use indirect heat.

CHARCOAL GRILLS

Probably the most underestimated piece of equipment is the charcoal barbecue. There’s been a trend through the years toward easier and simpler grilling, but the benefits of a charcoal barbecue, in my opinion, surpass the advantages of a gas barbecue. I prefer using a charcoal barbecue because I believe the radiant heat allows for a better sear and infuses a deeper flavor into the food than a gas grill.

The majority of people don’t use a charcoal barbecue because of fear and a lack of knowledge about how it can be used. Their first challenge is lighting the coals. The fact that we still sell lighter fluid today is barbaric to me because it has residual flavor and is unsafe. The chimney——or even a coffee can—is the best way to get your coals going. You can throw the chimney on top of a burner or in the campfire to start the process without using paper, or you can load it with paper and light it. But the point is that it will help you get reliable coals burning.

Be careful—as indestructible as they may look, charcoal grill lids can become dented. A tight-fitting lid on a charcoal barbecue is critical because there will be many times when you’ll want to go low and slow and need to shut down that barbecue to lower the heat. For the same reason, your charcoal grill also needs to have an effective dampening system that’s in good condition. The dampers, or vents, allow you to control the amount of oxygen feeding the flames.

The grates need to be cleaned after every use with a good grill brush. If anything is flaking or rusting, it’s time to buy new grates. The great thing is that replacement grates for the most common varieties of barbecues, like the Weber, are easily accessible at home improvement stores.

Sauté Pan Grilling

You don’t have to have both a camp stove and a grill in your setup. If you want to use your sauté pan directly on your barbecue, build a pile of hot coals in the middle of the grill that almost reaches the bottom of the grate and you’ve got an impromptu sauté station. An alternative is to take four or five sternos (the cans used to warm a chafing dish) and place them together in a platform made of bricks to make another impromptu stove.

 

PORTABLE GRILLS/SMOKERS

There are inexpensive, portable grill and smoker combos, and if you’ve never experimented with a smoker, camping can actually be a great opportunity to give one a go. I think I’m like a lot of people in that food is of major importance when I’m camping. You may not experiment much with outdoor cooking at home, but when you’re sitting around the fire or picnic table, you’ll be much more inclined to decide it’s the perfect time to start smoking some chicken (see Motley Que American Royal Invitational First Place Chicken). Why? ’Cause you’re camping, and most likely . . . you’ve got nothing else to do. This book is a testament to that fact because, across all the chapters, I created a big percentage of these recipes while camping.

 

 

Master Tool and Equipment List

 

I hope this will spark some ideas for the equipment you may want to have.

TOOLS FOR THE FIRE

Hatchet

Adjustable-height campfire grill grate or grill ring

Fire-starting “chimney”

Long lighters (a whole quiver of them for backup)

Smoke box

Fish-grilling basket

Cast-iron skillet

Cast-iron Dutch oven

Variety of durable pots and pans and lids, including sheet pans, roasting pans and wire rack

Barbecue gloves

Especially in competitions, rubber barbecue gloves are critical. Silicone oven mitts and hot pads are superior to cloth because they can be cleaned. But the use of gloves does not eliminate the requirement to wash your hands—they’re not “magic gloves.”

Barbecue fork

Tongs

Skewers

Basting brushes

Ladles

Long-handled spoons

TOOLS FOR FOOD PREP

Multiple plastic or synthetic cutting boards, preferably no wood, color coded for use with different foods

Measuring spoons and cups

Plastic bowls

Sharp knives

Zester

Box grater

Okay, why a box grater? Wouldn’t it be easier just to buy shredded cheese? Well, here’s the thing: You can do a lot with a box grater as a cutting tool while camping. For example, you can box-grate a carrot or onion on an unstable surface a whole lot easier than you can dice it with a knife.

Wine opener

Can opener

Colander

All-in-one salt and pepper grinder

Hand-press juicer

Meat tenderizer

Spray bottle for water

Squirt bottles for condiments, oils, and vinegars

Coffee maker and enamel kettle

First off, for safety I like to heat the water in an enameled coffee kettle with two handles. Nobody does instant coffee anymore, so I won’t even address that, but premium ground coffee can be easily brewed in a French press (my favorite) or a cone drip. It’s beneficial to have an air pot, which is like a big thermos, to pour the coffee into because you won’t have a continual heat source to keep it warm. Another good tip for outdoor coffee prep is to prewarm your mugs or cups by filling them halfway with a little hot water from the pot first.

 

Good digital thermometer

Timers

Lights and headlamps

Bricks

Heavy-duty aluminum foil

Parchment paper

Immersion stick blender (if power is available)

Blender (if power is available)

SERVING AND STOWING EQUIPMENT

Plates, compostable/recyclable

If you’re buying disposable plates, it’s worth the extra bucks to buy good ones. It takes only one mishap of dropped food to make the purchase worth it. There are really solid compostable or recyclable plates on the market today, so no excuses.

Eating utensils

Nothing makes eating outdoors more enjoyable than proper metal utensils. You can eat off paper plates, but nobody likes a plastic fork—and no “sporks”’ allowed. And finally, paper towels give more bang for the buck than paper napkins. (Always bring twice as many as you think you’ll need.)

Drinkware

I’m not a big fan of mixing outdoors and glass: Broken glass is difficult to clean up, and people often go barefoot and wear flip-flops around a campsite. But most people don’t like to drink wine out of a red Solo cup, so my recommendation is to get Govino Shatterproof cups. Another of my favorite all-purpose cups is the Tervis, which is like a thermos. You put something hot or cold in there and it keeps it hot or cold (and saves on ice). The Tervis also comes with a lid, which is nice when you’re out there in the elements.

Coolers (see sidebar, below)

Coolers and Food Storage

The ideal is to have multiple coolers that serve different functions—for example, one for raw proteins, one for uncontaminated ice to use in drinks, and one for storing food and beverage containers.

PLEASE do not EVER use ice for iced beverages that any cans, bottles, or packages have ever had direct contact with. These items may have been kept in warehouses and on loading docks and could easily contaminate your ice. You should see what a freak I am about “clean” ice.

My preferred coolers are the industrial ones with the more durable metal latches. But in general, coolers should have secure-fitting lids and proper draining ability. You may not realize that coolers are labeled by how many days they will hold ice. So when shopping for a cooler you might notice $5 increments in price between types, but that extra $5 may mean the difference between keeping your ice solid for one day versus six. So read the small print—investing correctly in a good cooler can be worth the money just in ice savings alone.

Bigger is not always better. Don’t get coolers that are too big for your needs. Similar to the efficiency of a refrigerator, coolers are more effective when they’re full and iced properly. And remember, large coolers are heavier and more difficult to move.

Frozen water bottles can be used in place of block ice or ice cubes if you prefer. Just fill your bottles three-quarters of the way with water and freeze them. If you fill the dead space in your coolers with frozen bottles, they will be more efficient, you don’t have to drain them, and your items won’t get wet from melting ice.

For the most economical and flexible way to store food in coolers, use quality, resealable gallon-size freezer bags.

If possible, store your coolers (cleaned thoroughly, of course) with the lid slightly open so that mold won’t develop.

 

New York Times Bestseller

Food Network superstar, celebrity chef, and #1 New York Times bestselling author Guy Fieri takes it outdoors with this smart, practical, four-color cookbook filled with dozens of recipes for meals, drinks, holidays, bashes, and more.

In this rollicking cookbook, Guy Fieri shares his favorite tips, techniques, and recipes for outdoor cooking all through the year, whether you’re hosting a backyard barbeque, relaxing around the campfire, or tailgating on game day. Stuffed with original recipes, dozens of color photos, and loads of great tips, Guy On Fire is guaranteed to get your grill going with palate-pleasing appetizers, phenomenal main courses for meat, fish, poultry and vegetables, cool salads, and fabulous desserts.

Loaded with tips on equipment, make-ahead plans, packing advice, and tons of sidebars, Guy On Fire provides all the tools you need for an outdoor feast.


 

Customer Review

Rarely do I come across a cookbook that inspires me to create each and every meal within its pages; in fact, I think this is the only one. My husband and I have experimented with many of Guy’s recipes in “Guy on Fire”, with pleasure and great success. I’m so glad we purchased it, and feel confident it will be one of our all-time favorites. BTW: prior to purchasing, I was concerned that other reviewers commented on the book’s awkward layout. I was pleased to find that an absolute non-issue. It reads and functions fine for me.

 Guy on Fire: 130 Recipes for Adventures in Outdoor Cooking by Guy Fieri, EPUB, 006224471X

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