My Vietnam by Luke Nguyen [free kindle books]


  • Full Title : My Vietnam: Stories And Recipes
  • Autor: Luke Nguyen
  • Print Length: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Lyons Press; 1 edition
  • Publication Date: August 16, 2011
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0762773944
  • ISBN-13: 978-0762773947
  • Download File Format: pdf

>>>Download<<<

A stunningly beautiful love letter to Vietnam with more than 100 recipes, from best-selling author and Cooking Channel host Luke Nguyen

 

In My Vietnam, chef, television star, and best-selling author Luke Nguyen returns home to discover the best of regional Vietnamese cooking. Starting in the north and ending in the south, Luke visits family and friends in all the country’s diverse regions, is invited into the homes of local Vietnamese families, and meets food experts and local cooks to learn more about one of the richest, most diverse cuisines in the world.

 

Savor more than 100 regional and family recipes—from Tamarind Broth with Beef and Water Spinach to Wok-tossed Crab in Sate Sauce—and enjoy vibrant, stunning full-color photographs bursting with color and textures and capturing the beauty of Vietnam, her people, and their deep connection to food.

 

Review

From zesterdaily.com:

Whenever I yearn to jet off to an exotic locale or simply want a way to spice up my dinner menu, I reach for Luke Nguyen’s My Vietnam. Part travel narrative and part cookbook, this colorful tome takes readers on a culinary and cultural journey through Vietnam. Along the way we discover the magic behind the country’s fresh, aromatic cuisine and learn how to create over 100 authentic, regional dishes. We also find out how diverse and charming this lush, Southeast Asian nation can be. A Vietnamese chef, restaurant owner and Cooking Channel host, Nguyen uses My Vietnam to detail his trip through his parents’ homeland. As he proceeds from North through South Vietnam, he examines nine specific destinations and one region, the Mekong Delta. Throughout the book, gorgeous color photographs enliven and illustrate Nguyen’s stories and dishes. Flip through its pages and you end up feeling as though you, too, are trekking through Vietnam. So superb are many of the photos that I could easily classify My Vietnam as a coffee table book. Yet, while the pictures may be stunning, the food and anecdotes are even more so. … Inspiring and intriguing, My Vietnam provides the ideal antidote to tired mealtime menus and burning wanderlust.

From the Inside Flap

Luke Nguyen, chef and coauthor of the internationally bestselling book Secrets of the Red Lantern, returns home to discover the best of regional Vietnamese cooking. In My Vietnam he takes a personal and culinary tour to learn more about one of the richest, most diverse cuisines in the world.

Starting in the north of Vietnam and ending in the south, Luke visits his family and friends, is invited into the homes of local Vietnamese families, and meets food experts and local cooks. Accompanying his stories are more than 100 regional and family recipes—from Tamarind Broth with Beef and Water Spinach to Wok-tossed Crab in Sate Sauce—and vibrant, stunning photographs. Together these capture the beauty of Vietnam and her people’s deep connection to food.

>>>Download<<<

Keywords

cake shop, healthy vegan meals, novelty cakes, 4 cup coffee maker, rotisserie recipes, minnesota candy store, tea leaves, coffee syrup flavors, vegetarian cookbook, easy pancake recipe, ty food, buy bbq, vegan lunch recipes, vegan and vegetarian, aunt jemima pancake recipe, engagement cakes, simple bread recipe, chilli chicken, cabernet, steak and lobster,
. . . . . . . . . . . 94

Cuban Chicken Stew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

Roasted Chicken with Sumac, Walnuts, and Garlic . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Coriander-Crusted Chicken Thighs with Mint

and Pea Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

Laotian Larb Lettuce Cups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

Chicken Cassoulet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Pan-Seared Duck Breast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

Duck Confit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

Duck a l’Orange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Chapter Eight PORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Maple Almond Pork Chops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Mustard Balsamic Glazed Pork Chops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

Pork Marsala with Mushrooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Garlic and Rosemary Pork Tenderloin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

Sweet and Spicy Pulled Pork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Sage Roasted Pork Belly with Stewed Greens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Sausage and Onion Stuffed Sweet Potatoes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Swedish Meatballs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Kale Carbonara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121

Lemongrass Pork Sliders with Shredded Cabbage . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Chapter Nine BEEF & LAMB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124

Steak au Poivre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Marinated Steak Fajitas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

Flat Iron Steaks with Mushrooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128

Lavender Peppercorn-Crusted Steaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

Meatballs in Rustic Marinara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130

Tomato Rosemary Burgers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Meatloaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Bacon-Wrapped Filet Mignon with Vegetables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Braised Short Ribs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Indian Beef Curry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Thai Basil Beef Stir-Fry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137

Spanish Lamb Stew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

Calf Liver and Onions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Chimichurri Lamb Chops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Moroccan Lamb with Preserved Lemons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Chapter Ten DESSERTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144

Pan-Roasted Pears with Thyme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

Berry Cobbler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Pineapple Upside-Down Cake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Distressed Peach Crumble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Caramelized Rhubarb Pudding Cake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

Cast Iron Apple Pie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

Black-Bottom Chocolate Cake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153

Bananas Foster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154

Chocolate Chip Skillet Cookie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156

Salted Pistachio Blondies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157

Conversions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

About the Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159

Introduction

I would love to tell you that I grew up watching my grandmother cook on

a cast iron skillet while I played on the kitchen floor, unwittingly picking

up the secrets to perfect cast iron cooking. I wish I could tell you that

she passed along her well-seasoned cast iron skillet to me when I got

married.

But it was the 1980s, full of low-fat foods, nonstick cookware, and aero-

bics videos. I may or may not have embraced all of those!

I didn’t learn the secrets of cast iron cooking until I was an adult and had

been cooking for several years. I wanted the ease of nonstick cook-

ware (without the toxic effects of the coating) coupled with the superior

browning produced by my expensive stainless steel pans. I also wanted

cookware that I could easily transfer from stove top to oven and back.

The cast iron skillet offered all of the features I wanted. It quickly became

my go-to pan for perfectly seared meats, flavorful casseroles, and rustic

stews. It also simplified Paleo cooking, which can easily become more

elaborate than a menu built on meat and vegetables ever should be.

One pan brought me back to the elemental principles of the Paleo

movement and served up some delicious meals in the process.

Someday when I have grandchildren, I intend to pass my culinary

wisdom and recipes along to them, but they’ll have to pry the skillet out

of my hands.

INTRODUCTION

1

CHAPTER ONE

Cast Iron Cooking

Whether you’ve been cooking with cast iron for decades or your skillet

still has the price tag on the bottom, here’s everything you need to know

about cast iron cooking plus a little history on this essential kitchen tool.

History of Cast Iron Cookware

The widespread use of iron came around 2,000 BC, long after the origi-

nal Paleo diet had faded into obscurity. Even then, it was predominantly

used in making tools and weapons. The first evidence of cast iron cook-

ware appeared between 200 BC and 200 AD in China, where cast iron

pans were used for salt evaporation. It has been used since then in

kitchens around the globe. In Japan, teapots made of cast iron, called

tetsubin, are heated over a charcoal fire and have been used as early

as 1500. In the Netherlands, special techniques using sand to create

a smooth, enameled cast iron cookware surface emerged around

1600. The English observed this improved method for making pots and

copied the technique in the 1700s, resulting in what has since been

called the “Dutch oven.” Cast iron cookware became a staple in Euro-

pean and colonial American kitchens thereafter. In the 1900s, cast iron

was upstaged by steel and aluminum cookware, but cast iron aficiona-

dos remained loyal, and for good reason.

CAST IRON COOKING

3

Benefits of Cast Iron Cookware

Cast iron pans offer numerous advantages over other cooking vessels,

including excellent heat retention, a nonstick surface, affordability, and

durability.

Cast iron pans retain and transmit heat well. By preheating the pan for a

few minutes, you can generate a very hot surface useful for producing

an excellent sear on meats. This is important because you don’t want a

pan’s temperature to drop precipitously when you add food, especially

if you’re trying to sauté vegetables or brown meat.

Well-seasoned cast iron skillets are also naturally nonstick, making them

a good option for eggs, paella, and other foods that tend to adhere

to cooking surfaces. Conventional nonstick cookware cannot be pre-

heated without damaging the surface of the pan and generating a slew

of chemicals into the air, and they don’t produce a good sear. Cast iron

offers both nonstick and superior browning capabilities.

Cast iron pans are also inexpensive, especially when compared to high-

end cookware used by professional chefs. You might already have a

cast iron skillet in your attic or be able to pick one up at a garage sale.

Because the pan is a solid piece of metal, it is virtually indestructible and

can last for generations.

Cast iron cooking also imparts the mineral iron into foods. For some indi-

viduals, particularly premenopausal women, this is a desirable feature.

However, if you’re following a Paleo diet and eating plenty of red meat

and organ meats, you may already have ample iron stores.

How to Choose a Cast Iron Skillet

You can find cast iron cookware ranging in price from less than $20

to well over $200. The differences will be more apparent depending

4

CAST IRON PALEO

on your level of experience working with the cast iron skillet and your

expectations of the pan. Some features to consider:

Size

Choose a cast iron skillet that is about the same size as your heat

source, especially if you’re cooking on an electric stove. A skillet that

overhangs by a few inches on each side, especially if it is a less-expen-

sive model, will not transmit heat throughout the pan as well and may

have hot spots. For the recipes in this book, I used a 12-inch skillet.

Finish

Cast iron skillets with an enamel finish do not require preseasoning and

are easier to clean. Enamel is also nonreactive, so tomato and other

acidic sauces do not leach metallic flavors into the food.

Enamel does not retain the flavors of years of seasoning and doesn’t

offer the same level of nonstick capacity of unenameled cast iron.

Enameled cast iron also doesn’t impart iron to the foods, which may or

may not be a desirable feature.

Price

If you’re eager to get started without a significant investment, go for an

economical pan. Lodge makes inexpensive cast iron skillets that are

available online and in most home goods stores such as Target and

Walmart. Le Creuset and Staub offer more expensive cast iron cookware

in a wide variety of sizes and attractive finishes. They are available online

and in fine cooking stores, such as Sur la Table and Williams-Sonoma.

Ergonomics

The cast iron skillet is heavy and may require two hands (not to mention

pot holders) to move from stove top to oven. Two ergonomic handles

can make this easier.

CAST IRON COOKING

5

Seasoning Your Cast Iron Skillet

If you choose an enamel-finish cast iron pan, no seasoning is required.

However, if your pan has a matte black finish, you should season it

before your first use and plan your first few recipes to be high-fat, low-

acid dishes without potent flavors, such as fish.

1. Remove stickers from the pan and wash with hot, soapy water to

remove dust and residue. Rinse and thoroughly dry with a towel.

2. Coat the inside and outside of the skillet with a neutral flavored oil,

such as palm shortening, macadamia oil, or avocado oil.

3. Place the skillet upside down in a preheated 325°F oven, setting

a sheet of aluminum foil on the bottom rack of the oven to catch any

drops of oil.

4. Bake for one hour and then turn off the heat. Allow the skillet to cool

in the oven.

5. Wipe the exterior of the skillet with a paper towel to remove any

extra oil.

6. It is now ready to use.

Caring for Your Cast Iron Skillet

Enamel-finished skillets can be cleaned in the same way you clean your

other cookware, by hand with hot soapy water.

Seasoned cast iron skillets should not be cleaned with dish soap

because it strips the seasoning and oils from the pan. Instead use hot

water and a kitchen scrub brush. For stuck-on pieces of food, use a tea-

spoon of coarse salt and a paper towel to scrub it away. Dry thoroughly

inside and out before storing the cast iron skillet to prevent rust. After

the first several uses, rub the inside of the clean skillet with a few drops

of oil while it is still warm from cleaning before you put it away.

6

CAST IRON PALEO

CHAPTER TWO

Paleo Diet Basics

The Paleo diet is based on the premise that the foods that humans ate

for 99 percent of our evolutionary history—the time before the advent

of agriculture—should comprise most, if not all, of our diet today. This

includes things that could have been hunted or gathered: wild game

and fish, roots, vegetables, seasonal fruit, eggs, nuts, and seeds. The

Paleo diet confers numerous health benefits as well, which is not sur-

prising since it eliminates the refined carbohydrates that dominate the

Western diet. People who adopt a Paleo diet often observe weight loss,

reduced food cravings, better sleep, elimination of allergies, improved

skin clarity, better digestive function, and even remission of autoimmune

disorders.

What to Eat

Modern interpretations of the hunter gatherer diet include pastured

meats, wild fish and seafood, locally grown seasonal produce, nuts,

seeds, fermented foods, and healthy fats, such as coconut and olive oils.

These foods are loaded with the essential fats, amino acids, digestible

carbohydrates, fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and phytochemi-

cals that have contributed to health and longevity for millennia.

PALEO DIET BASICS

7

Meat and Poultry

Meat and poultry form the caloric foundation of the Paleo diet. Wild

game and organic, pastured meats are ideal. While none of the recipes

in this book explicitly call for grass-fed, organic, free-range, or pastured

meats, those are the best choices.

If that is not possible, choose meat that has not been fed animal byprod-

ucts or administered routine antibiotics or hormones. For nutrition and

flavor, choose fatty cuts of meat, such as chicken thighs over chicken

breasts. Better yet, buy the whole chicken and use the bones to make

a nourishing bone broth. Organ meats are also a rich source of minerals

and should occasionally grace your table. Here are the more common

meat and poultry options in the Paleo diet:

• Beef

• Organ meats

• Bison

• Pork

• Chicken

• Quail

• Duck

• Turkey

• Lamb

• Venison

Fish and Seafood

Choose wild seafood over farmed, except in the case of shellfish, such as

mussels and oysters. To avoid excess mercury exposure, choose fish at the

bottom of the food chain and only occasionally eat predators such as shark

and tuna. Here are the more common seafood options in the Paleo diet:

• Abalone

• Salmon

• Anchovies

• Sardines

• Clams

• Scallops

• Cod

• Sea Bass

• Halibut

• Shrimp

• Mussels

• Snapper

• Oysters

• Trout

8

CAST IRON PALEO

Vegetables

The healthiest approach to Paleo includes loads of non-starchy vege-

tables. Choose locally grown, organic produce whenever possible and

avoid canned vegetables, which are bereft of nutritional value. (I make

an exception for canned tomatoes, technically a fruit.) Here are the more

common vegetable options in the Paleo diet:

• Acorn squash

• Green beans

• Artichokes

• Kohlrabi

• Asparagus

• Leeks

• Bell peppers

• Mushrooms

• Broccoli

• Onions

• Brussels sprouts

• Peas

• Butternut squash

• Pumpkin

• Cabbage

• Radicchio

• Cauliflower

• Radishes

• Collard greens

• Snow peas

• Cucumbers

• Spinach

• Eggplants

• Swiss chard

• Endive

• Watercress

• Fennel

• Zucchini

Root vegetables, often called “starchy tubers,” are a great source of

carbohydrates in an otherwise low-carb diet. Potatoes are a gray area in

Paleo because of their high glycemic index and the saponins in potato

skins. However, many Paleo diet proponents recommend them because

they provide resistant starch when cooked and cooled and are a good

source of energy. I have included them sparingly in this book, knowing

that some people choose to avoid them. Use sweet potatoes in their

place if you wish.

PALEO DIET BASICS

9

Here are some of the more common varieties of root vegetables in the

Paleo diet:

• Carrots

• Sweet potatoes

• Potatoes

• Turnips

• Rutabagas

Fruit

Fruit provides a delicious accent to the Paleo diet but ideally should be

locally grown, in season, and consumed in moderation, especially for

people who are trying to lose weight. Avocado and tomato are typically

considered vegetables and do not contain the same amount of fructose

and glucose present in sweet fruits. Here are the more common fruit

options in the Paleo diet:

• Apples

• Peaches

• Avocados

• Pears

• Blackberries

• Plums

• Blueberries

• Raspberries

• Cantaloupe

• Rhubarb

• Citrus fruits

• Strawberries

• Figs

• Tomatoes

• Grapes

• Watermelon

• Mango

• Root Vegetables

• Nectarines

Nuts and Seeds

Nuts and seeds are great for sprinkling on salads, snacking, and using in

Paleo baked goods. To improve their digestibility, soak nuts and seeds

in fresh water overnight, rinse and drain thoroughly, and add to the

desired recipe. To make them dry and crisp, spread the soaked nuts on

10

CAST IRON PALEO

a tray and place in a dehydrator or warmed oven until crisp. Drying times

vary significantly depending on the type of nut.

Peanuts are not a nut but a legume and are thus not part of the Paleo

diet. While they do have a similar macronutrient profile to tree nuts, such

as almonds, they may cause digestive discomfort and are not included

in this book.

Here are some of the more common varieties of nuts in the Paleo diet:

• Almonds

• Pistachios

• Brazil nuts

• Sesame seeds

• Cashews

• Sunflower seeds

• Macadamia nuts

• Walnuts

Healthy Fats

I prefer to use refined coconut oil in high-heat cooking because it stands

up well to the heat and does not impart a coconut flavor to the food.

Sometimes that is desirable, such as with the Coconut-Crusted Plantain

Tacos (page 58), but I don’t want all of my food to taste like coconut.

I only use extra-virgin olive oil in raw preparations, such as salad dress-

ings, and sometimes in low to moderate heat cooking with the cast iron

skillet.

Avocado and macadamia oils have a more neutral flavor than olive oil

and are especially useful in making mayonnaise and aioli. Ghee is clar-

ified butter and has a deliciously buttery aroma and flavor. However,

some people are especially sensitive to dairy, so I provide alternatives

whenever I call for it in a recipe.

• Avocado oil

• Coconut oil

• Ghee

• Macadamia oil

• Extra-virgin olive oil

PALEO DIET BASICS

11

Fermented Foods

Fermentation occurs in nature and has been part of the human diet since

the beginning. Fermented foods are present in most cultures and offer

a friendly boost to the gut microbiome. Make your own ferments or pur-

chase them from the store. Soybeans are a legume and thus not techni-

cally Paleo. However, fermenting soy improves its digestibility. I include

it sparingly in this book. If you prefer,

[collapse]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *