Tapas Revolution: 120 Simple Classic Spanish Recipes by Omar Allibhoy, EPUB, MOBI, 0091951259

January 31, 2017

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Tapas Revolution: 120 Simple Classic Spanish Recipes by Omar Allibhoy

  • Print Length: 224 Pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press
  • Publication Date: August 1, 2013
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00DE15P9S
  • ISBN-10: 0091951259
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091951252
  • File Format: EPUB, MOBI

 

”Preview”

CONTENTS

COVER

LIST OF RECIPES

ABOUT THE BOOK

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

TITLE PAGE

DEDICATION

INTRODUCTION

1 APERITIVO

Almendras

Aceitunas Aliñadas

Boquerones

Pimientos de Padrón

Pan Con Ajo y Tomate

Salmorejo

Membrillo

Almogrote Gomero

Mi Limonada

Mi Sangría Especial

2 FISH

Pescaíto Frito

Almejas Al Ajo y Perejil

Almejas Al Fino Con Jamón

Gambas Al Ajillo

Gambas a La Plancha

Alioli

Truchas a La Navarra

Caballa en Escabeche

Bacalao Con Samfaina

Bacalao a La Vizcaína

Bacalao Al Ajoarriero

Bacalao Al Pil Pil

Bacalao a La Sidra

Bacalao en Salsa Verde

Dorada a La Sal

Lubina a La Espalda

3 EGGS AND POULTRY

Huevos Estrellados

Huevos Fritos Con Puntillas

Tortilla de Patatas

Revuelto de Ajetes

Piperrada Con Huevos

Alitas de Pollo Al Vino Dulce

Pollo Al Ajillo

Pollo Al Chilindron

Pollo en Pepitoria

Pollo Con Salsa de Aceitunas Españolas

Pollo Con Uvas, Vino Tinto y Castañas

4 MEAT

Chorizo a La Sidra

Croquetas de Jamón

Conejo a La Cazadora

Albóndigas en Salsa

Migas

Carrilleras Estofadas

Cordero de Cuenco

Jarretes Con Alcachofas

Lechazo Asado

Costilla de Cerdo a La Cerveza

Pinchos Morunos Con Mojo Picoń

Carne Guisada Con Patatas

Ciervo al Chocolate

Rabo de Toro

5 VEGETABLES

Escalivada Con Romesco

Guisantes Con Jamón

Alcachofas y Espárragos a La Granadina

Espárragos Con Jamón

Pisto

Patatas a Lo Pobre

Patatas Con Alioli

Papas Arrugadas Con Mojos

Pimientos Rellenos de Brandada de Bacalao

Trinxat de La Cerdanya

Coca de Recapte

Pimientos Asados

Setas Al Ajillo

Coca de Cebolla y Anchoas

Ensalada de Hinojo y Naranja

Empanada Gallega

Lombarda a La Madrileña

6 SOUPS AND STEWS

Gazpacho

Ajoblanco

Sopa de Ajo

Marmitako

Suquet de Pescado

Caldo Gallego

Menestra de Verduras a La Navarra

Patatas a La Riojana

Cocido Madrileño

7 RICES AND PULSES

Paella Valenciana

Arroz Caldoso Con Bogavante

Arroz Negro Meloso

Arroz Con Costra

Fideuà

Arroz Meloso de Verduras

Arroz a La Ampurdanesa

Lentejas Estofadas

Fabada Asturiana

8 DESSERTS AND SWEET THINGS

Torrijas de Mi Madre

Buñuelos de Viento

El Flan de Mi Madre

Tocinillo de Cielo

Crema Catalana

Arroz Con Leche

Peras Al Vino

Uvas Al Pedro Ximénze y Crema de Tetilla

Tarta Asada de Queso Fresco y Moras

Bienmesabe

Filloas Con Crema

Churros Con Chocolate

Trufas de Chocolate y Aceitunas

Tarta de Santiago

Polvorones

9 THE CHEF’S CUT

Tortillitas de Camarones

Pulpo a La Gallega

Caracoles Estofados

Lenguas de Cordero Guisadas

Cangrejos de Río en Salsa

Callos a La Madrileña

Ensalada de Morcilla y Queso

Cochinillo Asado Con Patatas Panadera

Manitas de Cerdo Estofadas Con Membrillo

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

COPYRIGHT

 

LIST OF RECIPES

Aceitunas Aliñadas

Ajoblanco

Albóndigas en Salsa

Alcachofas y Espárragos a La Granadina

Alioli

Alitas de Pollo Al Vino Dulce

Almejas Al Ajo y Perejil

Almejas Al Fino Con Jamón

Almendras

Almogrote Gomero

Arroz a La Ampurdanesa

Arroz Caldoso Con Bogavante

Arroz Con Costra

Arroz Con Leche

Arroz Meloso de Verduras

Arroz Negro Meloso

Bacalao a La Sidra

Bacalao a La Vizcaína

Bacalao Al Ajoarriero

Bacalao Al Pil Pil

Bacalao Con Samfaina

Bacalao en Salsa Verde

Bienmesabe

Boquerones

Buñuelos de Viento

Caballa en Escabeche

Caldo Gallego

Callos a La Madrileña

Cangrejos de Río en Salsa

Caracoles Estofados

Carne Guisada Con Patatas

Carrilleras Estofadas

Chorizo a La Sidra

Churros Con Chocolate

Ciervo al Chocolate

Coca de Cebolla y Anchoas

Coca de Recapte

Cochinillo Asado Con Patatas Panadera

Cocido Madrileño

Conejo a La Cazadora

Cordero de Cuenco

Costilla de Cerdo a La Cerveza

Crema Catalana

Croquetas de Jamón

Dorada a La Sal

El Flan de Mi Madre

Empanada Gallega

Ensalada de Hinojo y Naranja

Ensalada de Morcilla y Queso

Escalivada Con Romesco

Espárragos Con Jamón

Fabada Asturiana

Fideuà

Filloas Con Crema

Gambas a La Plancha

Gambas Al Ajillo

Gazpacho

Guisantes Con Jamón

Huevos Estrellados

Huevos Fritos Con Puntillas

Jarretes Con Alcachofas

Lechazo Asado

Lenguas de Cordero Guisadas

Lentejas Estofadas

Lombarda a La Madrileña

Lubina a La Espalda

Manitas de Cerdo Estofadas Con Membrillo

Marmitako

Membrillo

Menestra de Verduras a La Navarra

Mi Limonada

Mi Sangría Especial

Migas

Paella Valenciana

Pan Con Ajo y Tomate

Papas Arrugadas Con Mojos

Patatas a La Riojana

Patatas a Lo Pobre

Patatas Con Alioli

Peras Al Vino

Pescaíto Frito

Pimientos Asados

Pimientos de Padrón

Pimientos Rellenos de Brandada de Bacalao

Pinchos Morunos Con Mojo Picoń

Piperrada Con Huevos

Pisto

Pollo Al Ajillo

Pollo Al Chilindron

Pollo Con Salsa de Aceitunas Españolas

Pollo Con Uvas, Vino Tinto y Castañas

Pollo en Pepitoria

Polvorones

Pulpo a La Gallega

Rabo de Toro

Revuelto de Ajetes

Salmorejo

Setas Al Ajillo

Sopa de Ajo

Suquet de Pescado

Tarta Asada de Queso Fresco y Moras

Tarta de Santiago

Tocinillo de Cielo

Torrijas de Mi Madre

Tortilla de Patatas

Tortillitas de Camarones

Trinxat de La Cerdanya

Truchas a La Navarra

Trufas de Chocolate y Aceitunas

Uvas Al Pedro Ximénze y Crema de Tetilla

 

About the Book

JOIN THE REVOLUTION!

A revolution is happening in kitchens across the UK: a new regime of easy, fast Spanish food. Tapas with minimum fuss, maximum flavour.

Omar Allibhoy wants YOU to cook classic Spanish dishes at home, using simple store-cupboard ingredients. Whether it’s vegetables, salads, and rice, or eggs, fish, meat and desserts, the emphasis is on simplicity: discover the uncomplicated delights of a tortilla de patata, and new twists on favourites such as boquerones, pollo con salsa, patatas bravas and paella.

 

About the Author

Omar Allibhoy worked with Ferran Adria of the legendary El Bulli restaurant, before becoming chef at El Pirata deTapas in London’s Notting Hill. He subsequently opened his two Tapas Revolution restaurants at Bluewater and Westfield. He lives in London.

 

 

A lo mas valioso de esta vida: mi familia y amigos

 

INTRODUCTION

Para abrir boca…

What better pleasure is there in this world than to cook for others and then eat with them? Food, like life, is best shared with friends and loved ones, and tapas are the embodiment of that.

In this book you will find many of the recipes that I have cooked time and time again throughout my life. Long before I became a professional chef I was a keen home cook; today I pretty much cook every day, if not in my restaurant then definitely when I come home and need dinner. At heart I am a home cook rather than a chef, albeit one with an obsession with food. I have absorbed everything I could from everyone I’ve known and worked with along the way: my mum, my family, other chefs, restaurants in which I’ve eaten.

So, how do you define tapas? There are many theories as to its origins but originally a bar would serve a small, free tapa – usually a slice of cured meat or a piece of cheese – on a small plate with every drink. According to some sources these were used to cover wine glasses to keep flies out (the word ‘tapa’ originates from the word for ‘to cover’). From these humble beginnings tapas have developed into a cuisine, and nowadays they can be small portions of pretty much any of the dishes that make up Spain’s wonderful culinary legacy. A tapa can be hot or cold: a handful of marinated olives, a plate of crisp, deep-fried squid or a small dish of a gently simmering chorizo stew, mopped up with hunks of bread. A tapa is whatever you want it to be.

The beauty of tapas is that you can share them so easily with friends. Eating from the same plate enhances conversations, encourages adventurous eating and brings us all closer. Tapas developed to complement a convivial way of socialising: moving from bar to bar and enjoying a small plate of food with your drink means the proportion of food to alcohol is friendly!

Tapas Revolution, the name of my restaurant chain, was the result of the culture and food I grew up with. My parents loved travelling and took me to every corner of the world with them when I was a child. So I was curious about other cultures and other ways of eating. At the age of 21, I came to London and was fascinated by the way people socialised in the UK, what they cooked and ate, at home and in restaurants. But mainly I was frustrated by the lack of good Spanish restaurants and couldn’t understand why people didn’t seem to cook any Spanish food at home. I decided that my mission was to put tapas on the map in the UK, and Tapas Revolution was born, with the stated aim of bringing the casual, convivial experience of the tapas bar to London.

I would argue that there is no such thing as ‘authentic’ Spanish cooking. Spanish food is constantly evolving and every region, restaurant, chef and home cook has its own different interpretation of the same dish. I have cooked these recipes hundreds, if not thousands, of times in search of the perfect result. For me taste and ease is sometimes more important than ‘authenticity’. I want to show you that Spanish food is not complex or difficult and can be cooked every night. You won’t have to travel the country looking for obscure and expensive ingredients, and I’m a firm believer in shortcuts – if you want to use a stock cube instead of fresh stock, go ahead! Sometimes you’ll want to splash out and other times you’ll be able to rustle up something fantastic using storecupboard ingredients – in fact some of Spain’s finest ingredients can be found preserved in oil or brine in tins and jars. I’m naturally biased, of course (well, Spanish ingredients are the best in the world!), and I recommend stocking your cupboard with a few ‘essentials’ – Spanish olive oil, pimentón (smoked paprika), sherry, olives, rice. But the most important thing is that you get a feel for what you like and what you can achieve.

As we know, a tapa can be pretty much any Spanish dish, so the recipes in this book have been grouped together by ingredient. Forget about the idea of courses that follow on from each other – just put together any combination of dishes that you like. This is particularly good when it comes to cooking for a group of friends – vegetarian? No problem. Don’t like seafood? Have a bit more chorizo. Desserts are often overlooked but Spain has a wonderful tradition of making sweet, milky puddings and tarts, so I wanted to offer several here. The final chapter is one that I just had to include: The Chef’s Cut has slightly more unusual ingredients and more complex techniques. This is for the true revolutionaries among you.

 

 

Recipe List

Almendras

Aceitunas Aliñadas

Boquerones

Pimientos de Padrón

Pan Con Ajo y Tomate

Salmorejo

Membrillo

Almogrote Gomero

Mi Limonada

Mi Sangría Especial

ALMENDRAS

ALMONDS

Almonds are the most popular dried nut in Spain. In fact, Spain is the second largest producer of almonds in the world and our almonds are unparalleled. There are a number of Spanish varieties – all of excellent quality – but the best almond has to be Marcona.

ALMENDRAS SALADAS

SALTED ALMONDS

SERVES 4

PREPARATION TIME: 1 MINUTE

COOKING TIME: 5 MINUTES

50 ML WATER

1 TEASPOON ROCK SALT

200 G ALMONDS [WITH OR WITHOUT SKIN]

1 Put the water and salt in a glass and give it a good stir.

2 Put the almonds in a wide pan over a high heat and dry-roast them, stirring all the time, for about 5 minutes or until the almonds are dark golden on both sides. At this point pour the salted water into the pan and give it a good stir. Because the pan is so hot the water should disappear within seconds creating a delicate, thin, salted crust around each almond. Remove from the heat and allow to cool down. These will keep in a glass jar for several months.

ALMENDRAS GARRAPIÑADAS

CARAMELIZED ALMONDS

SERVES 3–4

PREPARATION TIME: 1 MINUTE

COOKING TIME: 15 MINUTES

1 CUP ALMONDS [WITH OR WITHOUT SKIN]

1 CUP CASTER SUGAR

1 CUP WATER

1 Put the almonds, sugar and water in a wide, heavy-based pan over a high heat. Bring to the boil and cook, stirring constantly, for about 15 minutes. Watch what is happening in the pan – first the sugar will melt into a light syrup, which will start to thicken as the water evaporates. Then it will start to crystallize (it will start to look like salt). Keep folding with the spoon so that the almonds are covered in sugar crystals, which will slowly turn to caramel.

2 When it has reached this stage, remove from the heat and tip out on to a sheet of baking parchment or a clean work surface. Spread out with a spoon so they don’t stick to each other and allow to cool.

 

ACEITUNAS ALIÑADAS

MARINATED OLIVES

In Spain we are pretty much born eating olives. Spain is the biggest olive producer in the world so they are everywhere; you can’t avoid them even if you wanted to. I’m always coming up with different ways to marinate them; the possibilities for transforming simple olives into a tasty snack are endless. Here are a few combinations that will not disappoint.

GREEN OLIVES WITH LEMON, OREGANO AND CHILLIES

SERVES 3–4 AS A TAPA

PREPARATION TIME: 5 MINUTES

JAR OF SPANISH GREEN OLIVES IN BRINE, ABOUT 300 G

100 ML MILD SPANISH OLIVE OIL

6 SPRIGS OF FRESH OREGANO

6 DRIED CAYENNE CHILLIES, FINELY CHOPPED

ZEST AND JUICE OF 1 LEMON

1 Drain the Spanish olives from the brine and place them in a bowl.

2 Whisk together all the remaining ingredients and mix with the olives. Serve immediately, but you can also keep them in an airtight container (ideally a glass jar with a lid) in the fridge for up to a month.

GREEN OLIVES WITH MANCHEGO, ROSEMARY AND GARLIC

SERVES 3–4 AS A TAPA

PREPARATION TIME: 5 MINUTES

JAR OF SPANISH GREEN OLIVES IN BRINE, ABOUT 300 G

50 G MANCHEGO CHEESE, DICED

4 GARLIC CLOVES, WHOLE AND UNPEELED

5 BLACK PEPPERCORNS

100 ML MILD SPANISH OLIVE OIL

2 FRESH BAY LEAVES

3 SPRIGS OF ROSEMARY

1 Drain the olives from the brine and place them in a bowl, along with the diced Manchego cheese.

2 Crush the garlic cloves and peppercorns with the flat blade of a knife and add them to the olives, along with the olive oil. Rub the herbs between your hands to release the essential oils before adding them to the bowl. Give everything a good stir so the oil becomes infused with all the flavours. Enjoy immediately – although they will keep in the fridge for at least 2 weeks. You can reuse the oil as a marinade for chicken or fish, or to drizzle over a salad.

NOTE

For a different flavour, roast the garlic cloves before adding to the olives.

BLACK OLIVES WITH RED ONION, PAPRIKA AND CUMIN SEEDS

SERVES 3–4 AS A TAPA

PREPARATION TIME: 5 MINUTES

JAR OF SPANISH BLACK OLIVES IN BRINE, ABOUT 300 G

⅓ RED ONION, THINLY SLICED

1 TABLESPOON CUMIN SEEDS

1 TABLESPOON SWEET PAPRIKA

100 ML MILD SPANISH OLIVE OIL

1 Drain the olives from the brine and place them in a bowl, along with the sliced onion.

2 Use the flat blade of a knife to crush the cumin seeds and then add them to the jar with the paprika and olive oil; stir together. You can either nibble on these straight away or keep them in an airtight container (ideally a glass jar with a lid) in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. (Pictured here.)

 

Clockwise from bottom: Green olives with lemon, oregano and chillies; Black olives with red onion, paprika and cumin seeds; Green olives with manchego, rosemary and garlic

BOQUERONES

MARINATED ANCHOVIES

You will find these plump marinated anchovies in tapas bars throughout Spain, often served on a cocktail stick as a ‘pincho’.

SERVES 4

PREPARATION TIME: 5 MINUTES

20 ANCHOVY FILLETS, PRESERVED IN VINEGAR

2 GARLIC CLOVES, FINELY CHOPPED

2 TABLESPOONS FRESHLY CHOPPED FLAT-LEAF PARSLEY

5 TABLESPOONS GOOD-QUALITY OLIVE OIL, PREFERABLY SPANISH

1 Drain the anchovies from their vinegar in a colander while you prepare the dressing.

2 Place the chopped garlic, parsley and olive oil in a small bowl and mix well. Lay the anchovies in a shallow dish and pour over the dressing so they are evenly covered.

3 Serve cold. You can either pop these straight into your mouth in one go or make a ‘pincho’ by spiking on a cocktail stick with a green olive or ‘guindilla’ chilli. These will keep in the fridge for up to a week.

 

PIMIENTOS DE PADRÓN

FRIED PADRÓN PEPPERS

These small green peppers are from Padrón in Galicia, northwest Spain, and they are somewhat of a speciality – grab them while they are in season, from July to September. We have a saying in Spain, ‘pimientos de Padrón, unos pican y otros no’. It means ‘Padrón peppers, some are hot and some are not’, so prepare to play the game of Russian roulette; it’s very difficult to tell which ones will blow your mouth off until you have crunched into them.

SERVES 4–5 AS A TAPA

PREPARATION TIME: 1 MINUTE

COOKING TIME: 1 MINUTE

50 ML EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

200 G FRESH PADRÓN PEPPERS

SEA SALT FLAKES

1 Put the olive oil in a wide frying pan over a high heat and heat until it is just at smoking point. Add the peppers (carefully, as the oil will be very hot) and stir with a long-handled spoon in case any of them spit and burn your hand. In hot oil, they should be cooked in 1 minute. The idea is to blister the skin of the peppers fairly quickly so they still have a fresh pepper flavour on the inside, with a lovely crisp, fried exterior.

2 Remove from the pan, drain on kitchen paper and sprinkle with salt flakes. Enjoy immediately, and good luck!

 

PAN CON AJO Y TOMATE

BREAD SCRUBBED WITH GARLIC AND TOMATO

We eat this for breakfast, as an accompaniment to cured meats or to nibble on at the table. We even prepare our sandwiches like this, the way other people use butter. Remember, garlic wants to love you, so don’t forget to love him back.

SERVES 2

PREPARATION TIME: 2 MINUTES

COOKING TIME: 2 MINUTES

4 SLICES GOOD RUSTIC BREAD, SUCH AS SOURDOUGH OR CIABATTA

1 FAT GARLIC CLOVE

8 CHERRY TOMATOES

SEA SALT FLAKES

EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL, FOR DRIZZLING

1 Toast the bread on both sides – use a griddle pan, a grill or just a plain old toaster. If you are doing a barbecue, chuck the bread slices on the grill for a lovely smoky flavour.

2 Leaving the skin on, slice off the flat end of the garlic clove. Cut the cherry tomatoes in half.

3 When the bread is toasted, scrub one side of the bread with the cut garlic and the other side with the cut side of the cherry tomatoes. Squeeze all the seeds and juice from the tomatoes by grating the tomato against the bread; discard the skin. I like to use just a little tomato but you can use more – it’s up to you.

4 Place the toast tomato-side up (garlic-side down) on a plate, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and add a generous drizzle of olive oil.

OMAR’S NOTE

When you put this in your mouth, the first thing you taste is the pungent garlic on your tongue, followed by a hit of sea salt, then the tartness of the tomato and finally the sweetness of the olive oil. It’s an all-round experience. Don’t settle for fake pan con ajo y tomate – this is the real deal.

SUGGESTION

In the Valencia region they make this without the tomato – just garlic, salt and olive oil. Try it – it’s delicious with most things.

 

SALMOREJO

CHILLED TOMATO DIP

Salmorejo is traditionally from Seville. It is not a soup as many believe, but a dip. You will not believe how a few simple ingredients can be transformed into something delicious.

SERVES 4

PREPARATION TIME: 5 MINUTES

COOKING TIME: 5 MINUTES

1 EGG

50 G WHITE BREAD [ABOUT 2 SLICES]

300 G RIPE TOMATOES, ROUGHLY CHOPPED

1 GARLIC CLOVE

6 TABLESPOONS EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

1 TABLESPOON SHERRY VINEGAR

3 ICE CUBES

SALT AND FRESHLY GROUND BLACK PEPPER

BREAD AND JAMÓN IBERICO, TO SERVE

1 Bring a small pan of water to the boil and boil the egg for 5 minutes. Rinse under cold water and, when cool enough to handle, peel carefully and chop.

2 Roughly tear up the sliced bread and then put in a food processor or blender with the chopped tomatoes, half the chopped egg, garlic, olive oil, sherry vinegar and seasoning. Add about three ice cubes – this is to keep the mixture nice and cool as blenders can heat up the contents very quickly. Believe me, it really changes the dish if you don’t add the ice cubes so don’t be tempted to leave them out! Blend until you have a thick dip with a smooth texture.

3 Place in a bowl and sprinkle the remaining chopped boiled egg on top. Serve with bread for dipping and slices of jamón iberico. Another great way to serve this is with cooked peeled prawns.

 

MEMBRILLO

QUINCE JELLY

My family has a house in the mountains near Madrid and it is where we all congregate every Christmas. We are completely spoiled in that you only have to walk out of the house to come across wonderful natural ingredients: mushrooms, asparagus, game, fish, nuts, wild fruits and berries. As you may well imagine, I’m very used to cooking with all of these wild ingredients and Christmas is a great time for making preserves for the year ahead which are shared between all the family members. So, back to the point, here is my foolproof recipe for quince jelly.

MAKES ABOUT 5 × 400-G JARS

PREPARATION TIME: 10 MINUTES

COOKING TIME: 2 HOURS

3 KG QUINCES

600 G CASTER SUGAR

JUICE OF 1 LEMON

200 ML WATER

1 Wash and core the quinces and then chop into 3-cm pieces. You should end up with about 2 kg of prepared fruit. Put in a large heavy-based pan with the sugar and place over a medium to high heat. Stir the fruit from time to time so that it doesn’t catch on the bottom of the pan. Quinces are quite hard and unlike other fruits such as strawberries, peaches or oranges, don’t soften or release any liquid as quickly.

2 After about 15 minutes you will see the quince start to caramelize – at this point reduce the heat to low. Continue to cook at this low heat, stirring occasionally, for 1½ hours. After half an hour the quince will start to soften; after another hour it will become more like a paste. It should be dark brown in colour and have reduced to a quarter of the original amount. Add the lemon juice and water and cook for a further 10 minutes.

3 Your jelly is now ready. Pour into clean, sterilized jars; if properly sealed you will be able to keep for at least a year. Alternatively, you can pour into a baking tray lined with greaseproof paper. Once it has cooled and set firm you can turn out and slice into squares.

OMAR’S NOTE

Membrillo goes very well with cheese – in particular our famous Spanish Manchego cheese. I also like to eat membrillo with fresh cottage cheese and olive oil and often use it in cheesecakes too.

SUGGESTION

You can also make a softer, more spreadable paste, instead of this firm jelly. Simply add 2 glasses of water to the paste along with the lemon juice and purée with a hand blender until smooth. Continue to cook for another 5–10 minutes and then pour into sterilized jars as before.

 

 

ALMOGROTE GOMERO

CHEESE AND TOMATO PASTE

This Canary island speciality is really quite addictive (especially if, like me, you love cheese). Try it with crudités and roasted vegetables or simply spread on toasted bread.

SERVES 3–4

PREPARATION TIME: 10 MINUTES

100 G MANCHEGO OR OTHER HARD CHEESE

1 TOMATO, ROUGHLY CHOPPED

1 GARLIC CLOVE, FINELY CHOPPED

1 DRIED CAYENNE CHILLI, OR 1 TEASPOON CHILLI POWDER

PINCH OF SALT

50 ML OLIVE OIL

1 Traditionally this would be made using a pestle and mortar but you can also use a hand blender.

2 Chop the cheese into small cubes and blend or grind with the tomato, garlic, chilli, salt and oil until you have a smooth paste. Keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 5 days.

 

MI LIMONADA

LEMONADE WITH A TWIST

This is my signature lemonade and in summer I make a batch of this pretty much every week. Like gazpacho, it’s one of those things that I always have in my fridge in the summer months, and when friends pop over they will most often ask, ‘I don’t suppose you have some of that lemonade you make…’ Don’t be tempted to call this traditional lemonade – it’s my own invention.

SERVES 4

PREPARATION TIME: 5 MINUTES

COOKING TIME: 5 MINUTES

3 LEMONS

5 HEAPED TABLESPOONS SUGAR

½ CUP WATER PLUS 500 ML

1 Wash and peel one of the lemons, removing all the white pith from the lemon peel and cutting into strips; set the peel aside. Squeeze the juice of all the lemons into a bowl, making sure there are no seeds; set aside.

2 Place the sugar and ½ cup of water in a small pan over a medium heat. Bring to the boil and then let it reduce and bubble away until it becomes a golden caramel – make sure it doesn’t turn too dark. At this point add the remaining water, lemon peel strips and juice so it becomes a light caramel and lemon syrup. Bring back to the boil, allow to simmer for 2 minutes and then remove from the heat.

3 Leave to cool down before chilling in the fridge. When you are ready to serve you can either drink it as it is or blend with crushed ice to make it ‘granizado’ style. The beauty of this lemonade, apart from the taste, is that it will keep for a good couple of weeks in the fridge.

 

 

MI SANGRÍA ESPECIAL

SPECIAL SANGRIA

I’m sure many of you have come across sangria before but, trust me – you won’t have tried my special recipe! The idea behind this recipe is to make the fruit release more flavour into the sangria without wasting any fruit. It takes a little longer to prepare but I think you’ll agree the effort is worth it. You can make a batch of the syrup and preserve the fruit in advance – it should keep for 3 weeks in the fridge.

SERVES 6

PREPARATION TIME: 15 MINUTES

COOKING TIME: 5 MINUTES

1 ORANGE

1 LEMON

1 PEACH OR 3 PLUMS, STONED AND ROUGHLY CHOPPED

1 PEAR OR APPLE, CORED AND ROUGHLY CHOPPED

200 G CASTER SUGAR

¼ CINNAMON STICK

200 ML WATER

200 ML BRANDY

200 ML TRIPLE SEC

1 PUNNET [200 G] STRAWBERRIES, HALVED

ICE

1 × 750-ML BOTTLE SPANISH RED WINE

500 ML SPARKLING LEMONADE

1 First wash the orange and lemon and then peel off strips of the zest and cut into thin strips. Use a sharp knife to peel away the rest of the skin and pith and discard. Cut both fruits into segments. Place the orange and lemon segments and zest strips in a pan.

2 Add the remaining fruit (except the strawberries) to the pan along with the sugar, cinnamon stick, water, brandy and Triple Sec and bring to the boil. Allow to simmer for 1 minute, then remove from the heat and add the strawberries. Leave to cool and then chill in the fridge. All the essential oils and aromas of the fruit will infuse the syrup – this is the secret of this sangria.

3 Fill a large jug one-third with ice cubes and pour in enough of the fruit and syrup mix to come halfway up the jug. Add wine until the jug is nearly full and then add the lemonade to finish off. Stir with a long-handled spoon. Now sit back and enjoy!

 

 

Recipe List

Pescaíto Frito

Almejas Al Ajo y Perejil

Almejas Al Fino Con Jamón

Gambas Al Ajillo

Gambas a La Plancha

Alioli

Truchas a La Navarra

Caballa en Escabeche

Bacalao Con Samfaina

Bacalao a La Vizcaína

Bacalao Al Ajoarriero

Bacalao Al Pil Pil

Bacalao a La Sidra

Bacalao en Salsa Verde

Dorada a La Sal

Lubina a La Espalda

PESCAÍTO FRITO

FRIED FISH

The Spanish fritura (a plate of fried food) is very delicate – crisp on the outside and moist on the inside. There is nothing better than fresh fried fish but it can be tricky to get right as there are so many variables: the freshness of the fish, the size of the pieces, the flour, the oil, the temperature, the cooking time, the draining… The reason why fried fish is so bloody good in southern Spain is purely because they have mastered this technique through sheer hard work and experience. And now I will tell you the secrets.

The perfect fritura should have a mix of fish – I like to use squid, prawns and then some other small fish such as anchovies or whitebait. I wouldn’t recommend using anything bigger than 10 cm long.

SERVES 4

PREPARATION TIME: 10 MINUTES

COOKING TIME: 5 MINUTES

1 KG MIXED FISH, SUCH AS SQUID [FRESH OR FROZEN], WHITEBAIT, SPRATS, ANCHOVIES AND PRAWNS

150 G SEVILLIAN FLOUR [COARSEWHEAT FLOUR], SUPERFINE SEMOLINA OR CHICKPEA FLOUR [SEE HERE]

MILD OLIVE OIL OR VEGETABLE OIL FOR FRYING

SALT

1 LEMON, QUARTERED [OPTIONAL] ALIOLI, TO SERVE [SEE HERE]

1 If you are using frozen squid, always buy whole squid and let it thaw before cutting into rings yourself (chopped frozen squid tends to contain preservatives). If you are using fresh squid ask your fishmonger to clean it for you. Cut the body into rings and the tentacles into bite-sized pieces. Rinse the other fish in cold water and pat dry.

2 Spread the flour out in a shallow dish and start coating the squid rings, tentacles and fish. Make sure none of the pieces are stuck together and are completely covered with the flour – use more if necessary.

3 Heat the oil in a large deep-sided pan until a cube of day-old bread dropped into it turns golden brown in 20–30 seconds. Alternatively heat a deep fryer to 190°C. One of the biggest issues when frying in a pan is that the temperature of the oil can drop quickly, which means you won’t get that nice crispness on the outside. To avoid this, keep the oil as hot as you can and cook the fish in batches.

4 Put the floured fish pieces in the oil and fry for 1–1½ minutes, depending on the size. Stir carefully so that the pieces don’t get stuck together and turn so that they brown on all sides. Remove from the oil with a slotted spoon and toss them in a bowl with some salt. You can drain on kitchen paper but this will make them soggier as any contact with a solid surface will make the steam escaping from inside of the fish condense and will be absorbed by the fried flour.

5 Serve immediately with alioli and lemon wedges (although I’m a purist and prefer my fritura without lemon).

NOTE

Coarse wheat flour, semolina flour or chickpea flour are all perfect for this recipe as they create an airy film around the fish, which allows the steam to escape, resulting in a crisper coating.

 

ALMEJAS AL AJO Y PEREJIL

CLAMS WITH GARLIC AND PARSLEY

I love clams – well – I love shellfish in all its incarnations. A lot of Spanish cooking is about the quality and freshness of the ingredients and as the sea surrounds our peninsula, shellfish features heavily. We tend to do very little to it, except treat it with the respect it deserves. Garlic and parsley are classic shellfish flavourings and are all it takes to create a star dish.

SERVES 4–5 AS A TAPA

PREPARATION TIME: 10 MINUTES, PLUS SOAKING

COOKING TIME: 10 MINUTES

1 KG CLAMS

100 ML OLIVE OIL

6–8 GARLIC CLOVES, FINELY CHOPPED

3 DRIED CAYENNE CHILLIES, FINELY CHOPPED

10 SPRIGS OF FLAT-LEAF PARSLEY, FINELY CHOPPED

1 TEASPOON PLAIN FLOUR

150 ML WHITE WINE [I LIKE TO USE SOMETHING FRUITY – IT GOES WELL WITH THE FINISHED DISH TOO]

SALT AND FRESHLY GROUND BLACK PEPPER

1 Start by soaking the clams in cold water for about 20 minutes to allow them to release any sand trapped in their shells. Rinse thoroughly under cold water and discard any that are open, broken or that don’t close firmly when tapped.

2 Put the oil in a large frying pan (wide enough to hold all the clams) and add the garlic and chillies. Place over a high heat and start frying from cold, until light golden. Add the chopped parsley, flour, salt and pepper and stir for 1 minute.

3 Pour in the white wine and stir vigorously so that the flour and wine are well combined. Add the cleaned clams, sauté a couple of times and cover with a lid for 2 minutes. Remove the lid and sauté a couple more times. By this time all the clams should have opened, if not, cover and cook for another minute. Discard any clams that refuse to open and serve immediately with lots of fresh bread to mop up the sauce.

OMAR’S NOTE

You may have picked up by now that the Spanish can sit and chat for hours while eating – we call this ‘sobremesa’. Whether seated round a table or propped up at a tapas bar, it’s a cultural and social thing for us. The great thing about clams is that they take longer to eat than to cook and are perfect for chatty, social occasions.

 

ALMEJAS AL FINO CON JAMÓN

CLAMS WITH SHERRY AND SERRANO HAM

Clams, garlic, pimentón, jamón and sherry… what could be more irresistible?

SERVES 4–5 AS A TAPA

PREPARATION TIME: 20 MINUTES, PLUS SOAKING

COOKING TIME: 10 MINUTES

1 KG CLAMS

100 ML OLIVE OIL

5 GARLIC CLOVES, FINELY CHOPPED

1 SHALLOT OR ½ SPANISH ONION, FINELY CHOPPED

6 SLICES JAMÓN SERRANO [CURED HAM], ROUGHLY CHOPPED

1 TEASPOON PLAIN FLOUR

1 TEASPOON HOT PIMENTÓN, ALTHOUGH THE SWEET VARIETY WILL DO AS WELL

150 ML FINO SHERRY [SEE HERE]

2 TABLESPOONS FRESHLY CHOPPED FLAT-LEAF PARSLEY

SEA SALT AND FRESHLY GROUND BLACK PEPPER

1 Start by soaking the clams in cold water for about 20 minutes to allow them to release any sand trapped in their shells. Rinse thoroughly under cold water and discard any that are open, broken or don’t close when tapped firmly.

2 Heat the oil in a large frying pan (wide enough to hold all the clams) over a medium heat and add the garlic, onion and jamón. Cook until the onion is translucent, but not coloured.

3 Add the flour and pimentón and stir-fry for 20 seconds to cook the flour. Add the sherry, stirring all the time and then quickly flambé by setting light to the pan using a lighter or long matches. If you don’t want to flambé the sherry don’t worry, just cook for 1 minute so that the alcohol evaporates. Add the cleaned clams to the pan, turn up the heat and shake the pan vigorously, tossing the clams a couple of times. Season to taste and stir in the parsley, cover with a lid and cook for 2–3 minutes until the clams are fully opened (throw away any that remain closed). Stir again before serving with lots of fresh bread to soak up the sauce.

OMAR’S NOTE

Fino (which translates as refined) is the driest of all sherry varieties and should be drunk cold. This delicate sherry doesn’t keep well after the bottle is opened, so make the best use of it.

GAMBAS AL AJILLO

PRAWNS WITH GARLIC

You’ll find this dish in pretty much every tapas bar in every coastal town in Spain, as well as in all the major cities. We love our fish and shellfish so much that the capital, Madrid (which is in the middle of mainland Spain), is a major fresh fish importer, second only to Tokyo. There are two ways of preparing this dish, depending on whether or not you want to peel the prawns before cooking. Traditionally this would be cooked in a flameproof terracotta dish, in which you then serve the prawns – if you don’t have one you can use an ordinary frying pan and leave the heads and shells on. I love these either way.

SERVES 2

PREPARATION TIME: 5 MINUTES

COOKING TIME: 5 MINUTES

12 LARGE RAW PRAWNS IN THEIR SHELLS

3 GARLIC CLOVES, THINLY SLICED

100 ML OLIVE OIL

3 DRIED CAYENNE CHILLIES [OR OTHER DRIED CHILLI]

SEA SALT FLAKES

1 TABLESPOON FRESHLY CHOPPED FLAT-LEAF PARSLEY

1 Peel the prawns, leaving the tails intact (if you are using a frying pan you can cook the prawns in their shells). Sprinkle with a little sea salt.

2 Put the olive oil, garlic and chillies in the terracotta pot or frying pan and place over a high heat. When the garlic starts to turn golden, add the prawns. Cook for 1 minute on each side, until they just turn pink. Sprinkle over the chopped parsley and serve immediately in the terracotta pot. Take care not to burn yourself as the oil and the terracotta will stay hot for several minutes.

 

Omar Allibhoy is the new face of Spanish cooking: he’s charismatic, effusive, passionate and wants to bring Spanish food to the people of the UK.

Tapas Revolution is the breakthrough book on simple Spanish cookery. Using everyday storecupboard ingredients, Omar offers a new take on the classic tortilla de patatas, making this iconic dish easier than ever, and brings a twist to pinchos morunos and pollo con salsa. With sections covering vegetables, salads, rice dishes, meat, fish, cakes and desserts, the emphasis is on simplicity of ingredients and methods – reinforcing the fact that absolutely anyone can cook this versatile and accessible food.

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