[PDF | 14,84 Mb] Sabor – Noviembre 2018 – Download Magazine


  • Spanish
  • 88 pages
  • PDF
  • 14.80 MB
  • >>>Download<<<

    Keywords

    meat delivery, barbecue galore, teppanyaki restaurants, chocolate strawberries, irish recipes, cake baking recipes, recipes by ingredients app, t cooks, types of pasta dishes, pizza close to my location, easy chinese food recipes, pancake recipe jamie oliver, dutch cuisine, french wine, online birthday cake delivery, kringle pastry, kahlua drinks, easy vegetarian recipes, indian snacks recipes, craft beer restaurants,
    TAUNTON’S

    MAY 1 9 9 9 N O . 3 2

    FOR PE OPLE

    WH O LOVE

    TO C OOK

    Potatoes as

    the main dish

    Pull-out guide

    to using spices

    Sweet-savory

    glazed chicken

    The science

    of reduction

    sauces

    Coffee desserts

    Carrots-a

    fresh approach

    How to saute

    mushrooms

    $5.95 CAN $6.95

    05>

    a 74851 64904 6

    Introducing

    Flawless Fruit

    That’s just one of the goodies Cuisinart’s new SmartPower™

    7-Speed Blender can whip up. This versatile electronic

    makes fabulous fresh fruit smoothies, soups, salsas, and

    everything in between.

    Designed with you in mind, this is one very easy blender

    to use. The 40 oz. glass jar is dripless. The sleek touchpad

    controls are easy to clean, and indicator lights make it

    simple to operate. A powerful motor and patented stainless

    steel blades let you crush ice without adding liquid – do it

    perfectly at any speed, or with the special “Ice Crush”

    And with all that power, it still chops parsley to perfection!

    Cuisinart. We make life’s little luxuries easy to enjoy!

    Cuisinart

    SmartPower

    7-SPEED

    ELECTRONIC

    Cuisi

    Yo u r Kitche n

    1-800-726-0190 • http://www.cuisinart.com

    ©1998 Cuisinart. Cuisinari'” is a registered trademark of Cuisinart, Stamford, CT 06904

    From The Taunton Press

    11′.’TRODUCING NEW HEARTH’S BREADSTONE OVEN

    NEW HARVEST

    Long, long ago, our

    ancestors baked in

    SlOne ovens. But, as

    COOKBOOKS

    kitchens movcd indoors,

    methods werc

    left outside. Now they’re back. New

    Hearth’s BreadStone Oven is a heavyduty stainless steel exterior with a

    ceramic stone-lined interior . .Just turn it

    on, allow it to heat, shut it off and bake

    and marvel. Out of that stone interior

    will come evel’)1hing from

    wonderful crispy crust

    pizza to delicious

    casseroles. Not to

    mention a variety of

    breads wrapped in a chew)’ golden crust

    – succulent sourdoughs, Tuscan loaves,

    and savOlY whole-grains with a shelf life

    of two weeks or more. The BreadStone

    Oven. Countertop or built-in, it’s a simple, beautiful concept. It

    makes the kind of bread most

    American tables (and taste

    The Onion Harvest Cookbook

    buds) have never seen.

    by Barbara Ciletti

    I’IEW HEABTH

    SOFTCOVER, COLOR, 176 PAGES,

    B REA D 5T D N E 0 V E N ‘M

    ISBN: 1-56158-245-X, PROD #

    070370, $19.95

    WWW.BREADSTONE.COM

    1-800-785-7835

    READER

    SERVICE

    NO.3

    The Potato Harvest Cookbook

    It’s wha1’s

    by Ashley Miller

    m when

    out

    SOFTCOVER, COLOR, 176 PAGES,

    It’s gomg all oul when Jwng m.

    ISBN: 1-56158-246-8, PROO #

    070369, $19.95

    To order, call

    1-800-888-8286,

    or order on our web site at

    www.tauntonplus.com

    The Taunton Press

    Taunton Direct, Inc., 63

    S. Main St.

    P.O. Box 5507, Newtown, cr

    06470-5507

    APRIL/MAY 1999

    3

    74 Learn to get delicious

    fine

    A P R IL/ MAY 1 9 9 9

    I S S UE 32

    OKING® 64 Enjoy the

    bittersweet

    sophistication

    of coffee desserts,

    l i ke this tiramisu

    DEPARTMENTS

    6 Contributors

    70 Basics Cutting in

    butter; prepping

    8 Letters

    pineapple; water bath

    12 Q& A Smoke points

    vs. double boiler

    of oils; why bread fails

    n Flavorings

    to rise a second time;

    Oregano & marjoram

    freezing cookies;

    skinning chickpeas

    74 Food Science

    Reduction sauces

    14 Tasted & Tested

    76 Sources

    16 At the Market

    Salad greens hring the

    80 Advertiser Index

    freshness of spring to

    81 Recipe &

    your kitchen

    Technique Index

    18 Enjoying Wine

    81

    Ordering wine in a

    Nutrition

    Information

    restaurant

    22 Technique Class

    82 Quick &

    Sauteing mushrooms

    Delicious “Walk-

    so they’re browned

    away” roast chicken

    and flavorful

    84 Artisan Foods

    24 T ips

    Capturing flavor on the

    branch and in the bottle

    visit our web site: www.finecooking.com

    46 Pine Nuts Playa Big Role in Cooking

    by Kay Fahey

    These rich, buttery little nuts add flavor and texture

    to everything from pilafs to cookies

    52 Southern Buttermilk Pie

    by Robert Stehling

    W hipped egg whites give this classic a texture as light

    as a souffle; buttermilk and lemon make it nicely tart

    54 Master Class: Delicate Potato Gnocchi

    by Paul Bertolli

    Use minimal kneading and master the right flick of the

    wrist for dumplings that are irresistibly light

    SEE OUR COMPANION VIDEO ON OUR WEB SITE

    http://finecooking.com

    60 Exploring the Vivid Flavor of Tamarind

    by Robert Wemischner

    This tart, tropical fruit provides an appealing pucker

    to marinades, sauces, stir-fries, drinks, and sorbets

    64 Coffee Desserts: Sweetness with a Bite

    ARTICLES

    by Joanne Chang

    A chocolate torte, a tea cake, ice cream, and tiramisu

    get sophisticated appeal from coffee

    26 Potatoes as the Main Event

    by Beth Dooley & Lucia Watson

    74 Spice Chart (special pull .. out section)

    They’re earthy, they’re filling, and-paired with

    the right ingredients-they make a great main dish

    On the cover: Making potato gnocchi, p. 54.

    Cover pharo. Daniel Proctor. These pages: illustration, Julie Johnson; phocos

    clockwise from top. Scott Phillips, Grey Crawford, and Daniel Proccor.

    31 Sweet and Savory Glazed Chicken

    by Mima Lecocq

    Baking keeps the chicken moist; a flash under the

    broiler turns a saucy coating into an intense glaze

    34 Using Pasta in Soup

    by Clifford A. Wright

    Use the right size, add it near the end of cooking,

    and you’ll have firm, perfectly cooked pasta that

    brings delicious body to soup

    38 A Fresh Approach to Carrots

    by Seen Lippert

    Take another look at this familiar vegetable as it

    displays its sweet flavor and vibrant color in

    five fresh recipes

    43 Sizing Up Slicers

    by Janet Fletcher

    Can a dedicated food slicer do a better job than a

    good knife or a food processor? We tested fourfrom low-end to high-tech-to find out

    34 Simmer Italian soups so the pasta is perfectly al dente.

    CONTRIBUTORS

    Robert Stehling (“Buttermilk Pie,” p. 52)

    menu every week, except for the one week

    got his start in the kitchen of Bill Neal’s

    in August when she closes shop and takes

    Crook’s Corner

    her two dogs to Rainy Lake in Canada. She

    restaurant in North

    serves on the board of directors of Chefs

    Carolina. There he

    Collaborative 2000. Beth Dooley (right)

    worked his way up

    is a New Jersey transplant to Minneapolis.

    from dishwasher to

    She teaches cooking and writes for

    head chef. Next came

    Mpls/St. Paul Magazine and The Garden

    stints in New York City

    Letter, as well as for “The Splendid Table,”

    at Arizona 206, Home,

    a Minnesota Public Radio program with

    and Monkey Bar,

    Lynne Rossetto Kasper. Beth’s books

    among other great restaurants. But the

    Lucia Watson (left, “Potatoes as the

    include It’s the Berries and Peppers

    South beckoned, and a few years ago,

    Main Event,” p. 30) is the chef-owner of

    Hot & Sweet.

    Robert left New York to open his own place,

    Lucia’s Restaurant, an American-style

    Lucia and Beth collaborate on many

    Hominy Grill, in Charleston, South Carolina.

    bistro in Minneapolis and one of Gourmet

    cooking and writing projects. They wrote

    magazine’s regional best, now celebrating

    Paul Bertolli

    Savoring the Seasons of the Northern

    (“Gnocchi,” p. 54) is the

    its fourteenth year. Lucia changes her

    Heartland (Knopf).

    chef and co-owner of Oliveto in Oakland,

    California. He was the chef at Chez Panisse

    for ten years and cow rote Chez Panisse

    Mirna Lecocq (“Glazed Chicken,” p. 31)

    for this role, she’d

    Cooking (Random House) with Alice

    grew up around great food: her mother was

    opened another

    Waters. When Paul’s not behind the stove

    one of the first chefs at Chez Panisse (where

    restaurant in New

    at Oliveto, he channels his passion for

    Mirna got to eat chocolate mousse after

    York City called Across

    the finest ingredients into hunting, fishing,

    school every Wednesday). Though she

    the Street. Before that,

    foraging, making balsamic vinegar, and

    studied literature, Mirna was eventually lured

    she was living in her

    curing his own prosciutto and salami. He

    back to the kitchen. She worked as a line

    native California and

    lives in Berkeley, California.

    cook at Chez Panisse where she met her

    working at Chez

    husband, Tom McNary, with whom she

    Panisse.

    Robert Wernischner (“Tamarind:’

    opened Carried Away, a takeout shop and

    p. 60) loves to explore all of the highly

    catering business.

    After training at the Culinary Institute of

    flavored staples of the ethnic pantry. He

    America, J a net Fletcher (“Slicers,” p. 43)

    wrote The Vivid Flavors Cookbook (Lowell

    Clifford A. Wright (“Using Pasta in Soup:’

    honed her cooking skills at Chez Panisse

    House) and, with

    p. 34) is the author of five cookbooks, inin Berkeley, California, and then went on to

    Karen Karp, Gourmet

    cluding his most recent, Italian Pure & Simple

    a successful food writing career. A regular

    to Go: A Guide to

    (William Morrow).

    contributor to the San Francisco Chron­

    Opening and

    Cliff’s next book is A

    icle’s food section, she’s the author of eight

    Operating a Specialty

    Mediterranean Feast:

    cookbooks, including Fresh from the Farm­

    Food Store (John

    Celebrated Cuisines

    ers’ Market (Chronicle). Janet lives in the

    Wiley). His next book

    from the Merchants of

    Napa Valley, where she’s working on a book

    will be an exploration

    Venice to the Barbary

    on the cheese course.

    of cooking with tea, in

    Corsairs, a comprecollaboration with Diana Rosen. In addition

    hensive tome on

    Kay Fa hey’s first real cooking experience

    to teaching professional baking at Los

    Mediterranean food

    came when the line cook at her mother’s

    Angeles Trade Technical College, he

    and history to be published by William

    restaurant got mad because she wouldn’t let

    lectures widely on entrepreneurship for

    Morrow in October. In writing about Mediterhim leave to go sky-diving. He left anyway, in culinarians.

    ranean cuisines, Cliff enjoys focusing on the

    the middle of the dinner rush, so Kay learned

    roots of home cooking.

    to cook-fast. After that experience, Kay

    Joanne Chang (“Coffee Desserts:’

    decided what she really wanted to do was

    p. 64) has worked as a pastry chef at some

    Seen Li ppert (“Carrots,” p. 38) has been

    write, specifically about food (“Pine Nuts:’

    wonderful places: Payard Patisserie in

    quite busy this year, preparing for the openp. 46). These days she makes her living writ­

    New York City, and Rialto and Mistral in

    ing of Metrazur in Grand Central Terminal in

    ing about food, chefs, and restaurants for

    Boston. Now she’s ready to embark on her

    New York City, for which she is the executive

    magazines and newspapers. “I love it,” she

    own and will soon open her own pastry

    chef. Before Matthew Kenney tapped Seen

    says. “I get to write my article and eat it, too:’

    shop, Flour, in Boston.

    6

    FI ECOOKING

    Turned Her Passion F r

    to A Profitable Bu

    Have utensils, will travel could be Susan Titcomb’s motto. Twelve years ago,

    Titcomb, a 38 year old mother of two from San Diego, California, had a passion for cooking and a desire to control her own destiny. Anned with an idea, her husband’s support, very little capital and virtually no business experience, she struted the country’s first Personal Chef Service. Personally Yours Personal Chef

    Service became an overnight success and spurred her on to become a cofounder

    of the United States Personal Chef Association. “A Personal Chef can make

    $35,000 to $50,000 a year, depending upon the hours worked and the number of

    A VAILABLE AGAIN

    clients”, says Titcomb. Since most clients work full-time, Titcomb goes into their The Georgian Feast

    home and cooks 10 meals for the whole family. Her service includes grocery

    The Vibrant Culture and Savory Food

    shopping, preparation, cooking,

    ?!

    the Republic ?!

    GeorBia

    packaging and cleanup. With a

    by Darra Goldstein

    cost as low as $8 per meal,

    “I was captivated …. A wonderful

    per person, Titcomb has a long

    panorama of Russian hospitality as it

    waiting list. So what does it take

    was, as it is, and as it still can be.”

    to become a Personal Chef?

    -James Beard

    “Organization, persistence, a

    love of cooking and a little know

    Book if ,he Year, julia Child Cookbook Awards,

    International Assn. cifCulinary Professionals, J

    993

    how,” says Titcomb. For more

    S

    19.95

    paperback at bookstores or phone

    information, call the United

    1-800-822-6657

    States PersonaL Chef Association

    University of California Press

    at 1-800-995-2138 or go to

    www.ucpress.edu

    http://www.uspca.com.

    READER SERVICE NO. 46

    READER SERVICE NO. 57

    Barnie’s®

    Coffee & Tea Co.

    Enjoy the Finest

    Specialty Coffees and Teas

    -Smokes -Rotisses-

    from around the World.

    Infra-red rear burner

    Savor our Flavored and

    cooks a perfect

    Estate Coffees,

    meal everytime

    without flare-ups

    exclusive Coffee Cooler® and

    “lift Ease”TM, balanced

    Flavoring Syrups.

    roll top lid

    Porcelain enamel will never fade

    Call 1-800-284-1416

    and is easy to clean

    24 Hours a Day

    Removable Corian- side shelves

    or visit our web site at

    double as cutting boards

    www.barniescoffee.com

    Quality Gas Grills

    For dealer nearest you or more information:

    214 Bayview Drive. Barrie. Ontario L4N 4Y8

    1705) 726-4278

    Fax 1705) 725-2564

    www.napoleon.on.ca

    READER SERVICE NO. 58

    READER

    APRIL/MAY 1999

    7

    LETTERS

    Here’s the place to share

    your thoughts on our

    Three new things from Fine Cooking

    First, we’re happy to include our first special pull-out sec­

    CDOKING

    recent articles or your food

    tion, devoted to cooking with spices. Contributing Editor

    and cooking phi losophies.

    Molly Stevens spent the last few months grinding and

    EDITOR

    Send your comments to

    toasting and generally making her house smell wonderful

    Martha Holmberg

    ART DIRECTOR

    letters, Fine Cooking,

    as she compiled lots of useful information about how to

    Steve Hunter

    integrate the allure of spices into your cooking.

    PO Box 5506, Newtown,

    ASSOCIATE EDITORS

    Less fragrant, but very welcome to many of you, is our

    Amy Albert

    CT 06470-5506, or by

    new index on the web. Go to our site (www.finecooking.

    Sarah Jay

    Susie Middleton

    e-ma il to [email protected]

    com), click on FC Index, and then click on a letter or

    Joanne McAllister Smart

    search by keyword to find the issue and page on which

    COPY/PRODUCTION/WEB EDITOR

    a topic, a recipe, an ingredient, or an author appears. By

    Li Agen

    clicking on the issue number, you’ll get information on

    ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTORS

    Annie Giammattei, Kim Jaeckel

    how to order that issue if you don’t already own it.

    EDITORIAL SECRETARY

    We also want to remind everyone about Fine Cooking’s

    Kim Landi

    California Experience. We’re inviting readers to join us

    RECIPE TESTER

    Abigail Johnson Dodge

    October 21-24, 1 999, for three days of hands-on classes,

    CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

    seminars, behind-the-scenes tours, customized tastings,

    Paul Bertolli, Shirley O.

    Corriher,

    and remarkable meals in Sonoma and Napa valleys. We’ll

    James Peterson, Molly Stevens,

    Rosina Tinari Wilson

    be working with artisans and other food professionals,

    PUBLISHER

    including John Ash, Bill Briwa, Holly Peterson Mondavi,

    Paul Roman

    Bellwether Farms cheeses, Artisan Bakery, Kendall­

    CIRCULATION MANAGER

    Jackson and Mondavi wineries, and the Culinary Institute

    Sarah Roman

    of America at Greystone. See p. 19 in this issue for our ad.

    CIRCULATION PLANNER

    Brenda Hamilton

    ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

    Sam Vincent

    A boning knife can tackle

    roast to a 20-pound turkey.

    ADVERTISING MANAGER

    any carving job

    My favorite brand is Chicago

    Norman Sippel

    In Fine Cooking#30, J ames

    Cutlery, with a big, ergonomic

    SENIOR ADVERTISING

    COORDINATOR

    Peterson gives excellent adhandle.

    Nancy Crider

    vice on carving a roast

    Still on the subject of

    ADVERTISING SECRETARY

    (p. 22). If we don’t have a

    knives, a letter-writer sug­

    Marjorie Brown

    good carving knife, he

    gests sticking corks on the

    Fine Cooking: (lSSN : 1072-5121)

    ends of knives and storing

    is published bimont hly by The Taunton

    P ress, Inc., Newtown, CT 06470-

    them in a drawer. With or

    5506. Te lephone (203) 426-8171.

    witho u t corks, knives in a

    Periodicals postage paid at Newtown ,

    CT

    drawer are bad news, both for

    06470 and at additional mailing

    offices. GST paid registration

    the knives that can gouge one

    #12321 0981. U.S. distribution by

    another and for any unsus­

    Curtis Circulation Company, 730 River

    Road , New Mil fo rd , NJ 07646-3048

    pecting person who reaches

    and Eastern News Distributors, Inc.,

    into the drawer and gets a

    One Media Way , 12406 Ro ute 250,

    nasty cut.

    Milan . OH 44846-9705.

    -Frank R. Sherman,

    Subscription Rates: U.S. and

    possessions,

    Sudbury, MA

    $29.95 for one year,

    $49.95 for two years , $69.95 for t hree

    years ; o utside t he U.S. a nd

    Buying yeast in bulk is

    possessions , $36 for one year, $62

    fo r two years, $88 for t hree years (i n

    a smart move for bakers

    U.S. dol iars, please). Single copy ,

    suggests using a chef’s knife.

    A word or two on costs

    $5.95. Single copies o utside the U.S .

    But why does everyone ignore

    should have been included in

    and possessions, $6.95.

    the 8-inch, stiff-bladed bonyour Basics piece on different

    Postmaster: Send add ress c ha nges

    to Fine Coo king, The Taunton P ress,

    ing knife ? Properly sharpyeasts (Fine Cooking #30,

    Inc., 63 South Main St., P.O. Box

    ened, it makes short work of

    p. 72). I marvel at people be5506, Newtown , CT 06470-5506.

    any carving job, from a rib

    ing willing to pay SO¢ per

    Printed in the USA.

    8

    HOW TO CONTACT US:

    Fine Cooking

    The Taunton Press, 63 S. Main St., P.O. Box 5506,

    Newtown, CT 06470-5506 (203) 426-8171

    www.finecooking.com

    Editorial:

    To contribute an article, give a tip, or ask a

    question, contact Fine Cooking at the

    address above or:

    Call:

    (800) 283·7252, ext. 454

    Fax:

    (203) 426·3434

    E-mail:

    [email protected]

    Customer Service:

    For SUbscription inquiries, you can:

    ‘Visit our subscriber service section at:

    www.finecooking.com

    ·E-mail us:[email protected]

    Clay Magninque …

    ‘Call our customer support center:

    To report an address change, inquire

    Emile Henry Burgundy clay oven ware is designed

    about an order, or solve a problem, call:

    to go from your freezer to a

    hot oven to the table.

    (800) 477·8727

    Made in France. Call 1-302-326-4800 for a retailer near you.

    To subscribe, purchase back issues,

    www.emilehenryusa .com

    books or videos, or give a gift, call:

    (800) 888·8286

    READER SERVICE NO. 16

    Advertising:

    To find out about advertising:

    Call:

    (800) 283·7252, ext. 547

    E-mail:

    [email protected]

    �The

    Member Audit

    Audit

    Bureau of Circulation

    Bureau

    FAST!

    Cuts Cooking Time

    Cooks Any Recipe In

    Preserves Valuable

    Retail:

    By As Much

    Vitamins & Nutrients,

    If you’d like to carry Fine Cooking in your

    Just A Few

    As 70%.

    Enhances Flavor.

    store, call the Taunton Trade Company at:

    Simple Steps.

    (800) 283·7252, ext. 265

    Mailing List:

    Occasio

    [collapse]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *