[PDF | 35,66 Mb] Eat Well – January 2017 – Download Magazine


  • English
  • 148 pages
  • True PDF
  • 74.5 MB
  • >>>Download<<<

    Keywords

    busch beer, coconut custard, how to make bread easy, paleo restaurants, chinese delivery near me, gravy recipe, flour bakery, keto meals, quick cooker, spaghetti noodles, dessert recipes, best coffee brand, gluten free bread crumbs, leptin diet, good recipes, wine store nyc, paleo cookies, keto guide, hamburger recipes, blooming tea,
    Alice’s Tea Cup

    Delectable Recipes for Scones,

    Cakes, Sandwiches, and

    More from New York’s Most

    Whimsical Tea Spot

    HALEY FOX & LAUREN FOX

    In loving memory of grandmas Fox and Thomas,

    who were both sweeter than anything

    we could ever bake . . .

    Contents

    Cover

    Title Page

    The Answer to “How Much Glitter?” is “Yes”

    Introduction

    Afternoon Tea, Before and After Noon: Scones (and a Cream . . .)

    Breakfast and Brunch

    Soups and Salads

    Sandwiches

    Cookies

    Cakes and Cupcakes

    Other Sweets and Treats for the Alice in All of Us

    Mar-tea-nis

    The Basics of Brewing Tea

    The Art of the Tea Party

    Menu Pairings

    Tea-Dyeing Linens (and Clothes!)

    Resources

    Index

    Acknowledgments

    Copyright

    About the Publisher

    The Answer to “How Much Glitter?” is “yes”

    Glitter. Sparkle. Fairy dust. Glitter on clothing, on the table, on your face. . . . Own it. Do it full tilt. Too much? That only means you’ve unleashed your inner child, and what could be better than that? Just a touch? Great, you’re playful yet refi ned. Make your own glitter- encrusted decorations, add sparkleencrusted twigs to your flower arrangements, hang fairy- dusted ornaments from light fi xtures or trees. Sparkle will brighten your surroundings, create a wonderful atmosphere for your guests, and improve your mood! In fact, we’ve had several employees tell us that they wear our fairy wings when they are at home—alone—when they vacuum or do the dishes. Why? Well, how can it be a chore if you’re wearing fairy wings?

    Zac glitters a guest

    Glitter makes the young feel magical and the rest feel young. No one is ever too old to sparkle!

    Introduction

    Lauren and Haley having tea at Chapter I

    Once upon a time, in a land called New York City, there were two sisters. Their father was a spinner of tales, always armed with a freshly brewed mug of English breakfast tea. Their mother was a songstress who loved to be out and about, and together, they would take the sisters to afternoon tea wherever it was served. The sisters learned at a very early age that tea was more than a beverage—it was an event to be shared and protected. Tea was a sacred experience, whether at a hotel or at home; it was a time to connect, share your thoughts and dreams, and escape for a spell.

    And that is how Alice’s Tea Cup came to be . . .

    Thanks for everything, Mom and Dad!

    Thanks for everything, Mom and Dad!

    We, the sisters, Haley and Lauren Fox, spent our lifetimes enjoying the art of tea, from the drink itself to understanding the differences between an Assam and a Darjeeling. The act of taking afternoon tea—whether for a tea party, where friends gather to reconnect, or just as a safe haven to have a heart-to-heart with someone you love—is a true joy. Tea is a fixture in our lives, used to wake us up, keep us healthy and detoxified, add flavor to our cooking and baking, and provide a magical ambiance to share with friends.

    As we became settled in our twenties, we would meet for tea and dream about a place of our own, a place where the pinky needn’t be “up,” where afternoon tea could be enjoyed before and after noon, where tea was a healthy and hearty meal that didn’t leave you hungry, where people could escape from their daily grind for a nostalgic time full of whimsy and comfort, where tea was more like the upside-down tea party of the Mad Hatter’s than tea at the Palm Court—a family-friendly place for the Alice in all of us. We would talk about how “someday” we would do something that would fulfill us creatively and give us the stability to follow our individual dreams.

    Lauren, left alone with a piece of her first birthday cake

    Crowding our mom as she baked, as usual! Lauren’s T-shirt says “tea” on it!

    Haley’s sixth birthday

    It was almost by chance that we stumbled upon the tiny For Rent sign on Seventy-third Street off Columbus Avenue. But when we saw it, everything changed. Alice’s Tea Cup opened in December 2001 to a line around the corner. It didn’t hurt that Florence Fabricant had featured us on the cover of the Metro section of the New York Times the week before (how lucky are we?), and that many passersby had been coming in, curiouser and curiouser, to find out what we were planning on opening there (oh, Upper West Siders are such a community-minded group!). We had a fire lit under us, with anticipation brewing like a fresh pot of Grand Keemun!

    We found ourselves in this position because Haley’s husband, Michael Eisenberg, a restaurant consultant, had continued to tell us to “act as if” rather than just talk about this fantasy tea salon. One day, as he had suspected, we found ourselves with a business plan, financing, and a lease that was just waiting to be signed. Michael had planned to assist us with opening and then continue consulting for others, but he hasn’t left us since that day. (Thanks, Michael!) We were immediately embraced by the neighborhood as a shelter from the hustle and bustle of the city streets.

    Michael Eisenberg, our director of operations

    As our popularity expanded, so did we by lengthening our hours and expanding our menus and, ultimately, by opening up two more locations (Sixty-fourth and Lexington Avenue and Eighty-first between Second and Third avenues). Alice’s Tea Cup has grown from that one “little shop around the corner” that offered only afternoon tea, teapots, and loose tea to three bustling Manhattan locations, all offering breakfast, brunch, lunch, supper, and, of course, afternoon tea served before and after noon, along with little shops that sell everything from tea ware to fairy wings! All our locations host bridal and baby showers, birthday parties, and even un-birthday parties. We design and make wedding and birthday cakes and cater parties, and our bakery offers five daily scone choices, incredible cakes, cupcakes, cookies, muffins, and out-of-this-world banana bread. In 2008 we launched our gift website, where shoppers can choose anything from loose tea to unique gift boxes.

    People often ask us how it is to work as a family: sister as partner, husband or brother-in-law as the director of operations—it does sound a little frightening. But for us, the family dynamic works in a way that another kind of partnership wouldn’t. Our sisterly personalities are so different that we tend to view ourselves as a yin to the other’s yang, each bringing her own sensibility and expertise to the table. This diversity of personality and expertise is what has made Alice’s unique and accessible. But what continues to drive Alice’s growth is really the staff, with their wonderful personalities and unparalleled love for our food and for creating a memorable experience for our customers. We are beyond grateful to them all, past and present, for our continued success.

    Alice’s Tea Cup prides itself on the unique menus we offer, full of tea infusions, beginning with our afternoon tea menu and ending with mar-tea-nis. Our philosophy is “tea turned on its ear”: smoking our chicken with Lapsang Souchong, steeping our eggs in Maté Carnival, infusing our crème anglaise with Mauritius. Our scones push the limits on creative, with choices such as pumpkin with a caramel glaze, Stilton with walnuts, peanut butter and jelly, and even ginger-pear. Our brunch menu boasts such unique selections as Alice’s Curious French Toast Bread Pudding and Alice’s Eggs Benedict, which is served, of course, on a ham and cheese scone. This cookbook provides these easy-to-follow recipes and dozens more, and also includes tips on how to avoid waste (anything can be used to create a new variety of scone!) and suggestions on how to throw a “curiouser and curiouser” tea party with nothing other than items you already have in your cupboard.

    The initial inspiration for our menu came from Lauren, who kept trying to perfect “the scone” so that we could throw our own tea parties for friends. We were tired and saddened by the impression people had of the scone: dry as a hockey puck, not a muffin but not cake but not bread . . . We took Lauren’s already near-perfect scone recipe and left it in the capable hands of Sue McClinton, our über-baker-extraordinaire, who perfected it and has been coming up with creative additions daily for almost eight years.

    Our family, with mocha cake

    Our scones are wildly popular in the blogosphere and beyond. Hillary Clinton was overheard telling someone on the phone how much she loved them after brunch one day, and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart has a standing weekly assorted scone order. Thousands of patrons have been asking for the recipe for years and years. So here it is . . .

    Afternoon Tea, Before and After Noon: Scones (and a Cream . . .)

    Scones. Not hockey pucks, not murder weapons, scones. Our scones are wildly popular, and it’s because they’re that good! At Alice’s, we concentrate on making all foods light, fluffy, and delicious, and we make no exception with the ever-important scone. Scones may be a throwback favorite for tea aficionados, but most people are used to tolerating the scone, not truly, truly loving it. Throw out your preconceived notions about scones being dry, salty, and full of baking soda—it’s time to redefine the scone. We’re a tea salon, after all, and we knew our scones had to be more than just passable, more than a simple conduit for clotted cream and preserves. Our scones had to be great—and they are.

    We could fill an entire book with scone recipes, but we chose to restrain ourselves and offer these nineteen classic Alice’s Tea Cup scones so that we could fit in some other recipes as well!

    Tips

    In the unlikely event that you’re left with uneaten scones after three days, it’s time to make some wonderful biscotti! Just cut the scones into ½- to 1-inch-thick slices and bake them at 350°F for about 5 minutes on each side. For an extra treat, sprinkle a little sugar on each side before baking. Yum!

    Please do not overwork the scone dough! It should seem slightly unmixed. This is essential to achieving the light and fluffy nature of our scones.

    Pumpkin Scones

    {MAKES 10 TO 12 SCONES}

    SCONES

    3 cups all-purpose flour

    ⅓ cup sugar

    ½ teaspoon baking soda

    2½ teaspoons baking powder

    ¾ teaspoon kosher salt

    ¼ cup ground ginger

    ¼ cup ground cinnamon

    1½ sticks (¾ cup) unsalted butter, cut into ½ -inch pieces

    1¼ cups buttermilk

    1 cup canned pumpkin puree (all pumpkin, not pumpkin pie filling)

    2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract

    CARAMEL GLAZE

    2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter

    1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

    ½ teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

    ¼ teaspoon kosher salt

    ½ cup heavy cream

    AH, THE PUMPKIN SCONE. The most discussed and praised scone on the planet. In all honesty, this scone was a happy accident of sorts. For Thanksgiving 2003, our baker, Sue McClinton, had the idea of making a pumpkin scone instead of a pumpkin cheesecake, and because of its popularity (and the fact that Haley has to have one every day), we kept it on through Christmas that year. Once the holidays were over and the mistletoe un-hung, Sue moved on to another type of scone, and all-but-rioting broke out that week when patrons discovered that there were no pumpkin scones. We heard the message loud and clear and have had pumpkin scones on the menu every day since then. In fact, pumpkin became our staple scone well before the standard and expected buttermilk scone entered our daily repertoire! Moist, slightly spicy, definitely gooey, and sweet on top (think of pumpkin pie inside a scone and you get the idea), the pumpkin scone remains a major favorite, and Haley—and now her kids—continues to have one almost each day! (In fact, Haley’s son, Maddan, constantly begs to take one to school for a snack.)

    These scones are best when served warm, but if you aren’t serving them right away, we recommend that you don’t glaze them until shortly before you serve them.

    Sue makes Pumpkin Scones

    1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.

    2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, salt, ginger, and cinnamon.

    3. With clean hands, work the butter into the dry mixture until it is thoroughly incorporated and has the consistency of fine breadcrumbs.

    4. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and pour the buttermilk, pumpkin puree, and vanilla extract into the well. Still using your hands, combine the ingredients until all the dry mixture is wet, but do not knead!

    5. Turn the mixture onto a floured surface and gather the dough together. Gently pat the dough to make a disk about 1½ inches thick. Using a 3- or 3½-inch biscuit cutter, cut out as many scones as you can and lay them on a nonstick baking sheet. Gather the remaining dough together lightly to cut out more scones—just don’t knead the dough too much.

    6. Bake the scones for about 12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Let the scones cool slightly on the baking sheet (about 20 minutes) before glazing them.

    7. While the scones are cooling, prepare the caramel glaze: Place the butter, brown sugar, lemon juice, and salt in a saucepan over medium heat and whisk gently until the mixture is smooth. Just as the mixture comes to a light boil, add the heavy cream and reduce the heat to low. Whisk well for 2 minutes, or until the glaze is thickened and smooth; then remove the pan from the heat.

    8. To glaze a scone, hold it by the bottom, dip the top in the warm caramel glaze, and place it back on the baking sheet.

    Buttermilk Scones

    {MAKES 10 TO 12 SCONES}

    3 cups all-purpose flour

    ½ teaspoon baking soda

    2½ teaspoons baking powder

    ¾ teaspoon kosher salt

    1½ sticks (¾ cup) unsalted butter, melted

    ¾ cup buttermilk

    INITIALLY WE SERVED only sweet scones, but seriously, what were we thinking? We came to our senses, listened to our customers, and created another daily staple: the first of our savory scone offerings. This is a plain—but far from bland—buttermilk scone, something akin to a buttermilk biscuit, but in our opinion, better . . .

    1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.

    2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.

    3. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and pour the butter and buttermilk into the well. With clean hands, combine the ingredients until all the dry mixture is wet, but do not knead!

    4. Turn the mixture onto a floured surface and gather the dough together. Gently pat the dough to make a disk about 1½ inches thick. Using a 3- or 3½-inch biscuit cutter, cut out as many scones as you can and lay them on a nonstick baking sheet. Gather the remaining dough together lightly to cut out more scones—just don’t knead the dough too much.

    5. Bake the scones for about 12 minutes, or until lightly browned.

    Black Forest Ham and Cheese Scones

    {MAKES 10 TO 12 SCONES}

    3 cups all-purpose flour

    ¼ teaspoon baking soda

    1¼ teaspoons baking powder

    ½ teaspoon kosher salt

    ½ cup diced cheddar cheese (¼-inch dice)

    ½ cup diced Gruyère cheese (¼-inch dice)

    ¾ cup chopped sliced Black Forest ham (½-inch pieces)

    ¼ cup minced fresh chives

    1¼ sticks (10 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted

    ½ cup buttermilk

    THE SECOND ADDITION to our savory scone repertoire, this one has also become a daily offering at all our locations. We took two favorite all-American ingredients, fancied them up a bit, and added them to our buttermilk scone recipe. Black Forest ham, cheddar cheese, and chives make this scone irresistible! We’ve been told that it’s very hard to eat just one of these cheesy treats.

    1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.

    2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Add the cheeses, ham, and chives to the dry mixture and combine thoroughly.

    3. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and pour the butter and buttermilk into the well. With clean hands, combine the ingredients until all the dry mixture is wet, but do not knead!

    4. Turn the mixture onto a floured surface and gather the dough together. Gently pat the dough to make a disk about 1½ inches thick. Using a 3- or 3½-inch biscuit cutter, cut out as many scones as you can and lay them on a nonstick baking sheet. Gather the remaining dough together lightly to cut out more scones—just don’t knead the dough too much.

    5. Bake the scones for about 12 minutes, or until lightly browned.

    Mixed Berry Scones

    {MAKES 10 TO 12 SCONES}

    3 cups all-purpose flour

    ⅓ cup sugar

    ½ teaspoon baking soda

    2½ teaspoons baking powder

    ¾ teaspoon kosher salt

    1½ sticks (¾ cup) unsalted butter, cut into ½ -inch pieces

    ½ cup blueberries

    ½ cup raspberries

    ½ cup blackberries

    ¼ cup hulled and quartered strawberries

    1¼ cups buttermilk

    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

    ¼ cup heavy cream (for brushing)

    ¼ cup sugar (for sprinkling)

    IMAGINE THE GOODNESS of a sweet scone, then add an assortment of fresh berries to it, and the result is a sweet treat with a burst of tart yumminess. You can use the berry combination below or mix and match to find your favorite.

    1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

    2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.

    3. With clean hands, work the butter into the dry mixture until it is thoroughly incorporated and has the consistency of fine breadcrumbs. Add all the berries and stir well, so that the berries are evenly distributed throughout the mixture.

    4. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and pour the buttermilk and vanilla extract into the well. Still using your hands, combine the ingredients until all the dry mixture is wet, but do not knead!

    5. Turn the mixture onto a floured surface and gather the dough together. Gently pat the dough to make a disk about 1½ inches thick. Using a 3- or 3½-inch biscuit cutter, cut out as many scones as you can and lay them on a nonstick baking sheet. Gather the remaining dough together lightly to cut out more scones—just don’t knead the dough too much.

    6. Brush the top of each scone liberally with heavy cream and then sprinkle with sugar. Bake the scones for about 12 minutes, or until lightly browned.

    Tip

    Don’t throw away berries or other fruits that are starting to feel a little mushy—use them to make scones! Either slice them up and put them into the mixture or blend/puree them and add them to the batter.

    Walnut Stilton Scones

    {MAKES 10 TO 12 SCONES}

    3 cups all-purpose flour

    ¼ teaspoon baking soda

    1¼ teaspoons baking powder

    ½ teaspoon kosher salt

    ¾ cup crumbled Stilton cheese

    ¾ cup finely chopped walnuts

    1¼ sticks (10 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted

    ½ cup buttermilk

    AS OUR SCONE WORLD grew, Sue created this sophisticated savory delight. Try mini versions of these scones when entertaining, served with grapes and sliced apples! Walnut pieces and the tangy boldness of Stilton cheese give this scone its complex flavor.

    1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.

    2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Add the Stilton and walnuts to the dry mixture, and combine thoroughly.

    3. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and pour the butter and buttermilk into the well. With clean hands, combine the ingredients until all the dry mixture is wet, but do not knead!

    4. Turn the mixture onto a floured surface and gather the dough together. Gently pat the dough to make a disk about 1½ inches thick. Using a 3- or 3½-inch biscuit cutter, cut out as many scones as you can and lay them on a nonstick baking sheet. Gather the remaining dough together lightly to cut out

    [collapse]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *