[PDF | 62,96 Mb] LCBO Food & Drink – November 2018 – Download Magazine


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    GOOD

    HOUSEKEEPING

    KIDS COOK!

    100+ SUPER-EASY, DELICIOUS RECIPES

    GOOD HOUSEKEEPING is a registered trademark of Hearst Communications, Inc.

    © 2017 Hearst Communications, Inc.

    All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (including electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without prior written permission from the publisher.

    Every effort has been made to ensure that all the information in this book is accurate. However, due to differing conditions, tools, and individual skills, the publisher cannot be responsible for any injuries, losses, and/or other damages that may result from the use of the information in this book.

    ISBN: 978-1-61837-288-8

    The Good Housekeeping Cookbook Seal guarantees that the recipes in this cookbook meet the strict standards of the Good Housekeeping Research Institute. The Institute has been a source of reliable information and a consumer advocate since 1900, and established its seal of approval in 1909. Every recipe has been triple-tested for ease, reliability, and great taste.

    For information about custom editions, special sales, and premium and corporate purchases, please contact Sterling Special Sales at 800-805-5489 or [email protected]

    goodhousekeeping.com

    sterlingpublishing.com

    Book design by Heather Kelly

    GOOD HOUSEKEEPING

    Jane Francisco

    EDITOR IN CHIEF

    Melissa Geurts

    DESIGN DIRECTOR

    Susan Westmoreland

    FOOD DIRECTOR

    Sharon Franke

    KITCHEN APPLIANCES & TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR

    THE GOOD HOUSEKEEPING INSTITUTE

    CONTENTS

    FOREWORD

    GET READY TO COOK!

    YUMMY BREAKFASTS

    LUNCHES TO GO

    SUPER SNACKS & SIPS

    TASTY DINNERS & SIDES

    SWEET TREATS

    PHOTO CREDITS

    METRIC CONVERSION CHARTS

    PINEAPPLE & TOASTED-COCONUT SKEWERS • PAGE 79

    PARSNIP CHIPS • PAGE 79

    SPICED APPLE WEDGES WITH YOGURT • PAGE 79

    FOREWORD

    When we decided to create this book, the first question my editor asked was “How young is too young to cook?” I’m a firm believer in starting early. Include your children in food prep—even toddlers can measure flour, pick leaves from herbs, and wash berries. I’m not encouraging anyone to have a three-year-old chopping or frying, but building interest and comfort in the kitchen goes a long way in establishing culinary (and math) skills.

    When I started to cook with my son, he’d wake up every Saturday morning and ask, “Mom, wanna cook with the machines?” This was my cue to get out the measuring cups and spoons and, of course, the mixer, blender, or food processor. He’d measure and dump dry ingredients, crack eggs (experience has taught us to do this into a smaller bowl—not straight into the batter . . .), and knead dough. By the time he went to kindergarten, we’d baked coffeecakes, scones, Dutch babies, pizzas, and more. And we’d also branched into cooking without machines.

    This book provides young chefs with all the kitchen smarts they need. Tweens can test their wings by cooking our Triple-Decker Tortilla Pie (page 106), Crunchy Deviled Chicken (page 104), and Honey-Lime Ramen Salad (page 57) on their own. Or parents can follow our step-by-step guide to make Bunny Banana Pancakes (page 29) or a party-perfect Snake Cake (page 128) with younger children. Kids Cook! is full of easy, delicious recipes in a fun, accessible format. And true to our Good Housekeeping history, we include safety info, equipment musts, measuring tips, and eight important rules to follow before you begin. So . . . ready, set, cook! Here’s to the next generation of confident cooks!

    SUSAN WESTMORELAND

    Food Director, Good Housekeeping

    GET READY TO COOK!

    Do you ever wish you could whip up a delicious dinner to impress your family or make a hearty breakfast to wow your friends after a sleepover? Then congratulations! You’re holding THE BOOK for you! Whether it’s creating to-die-for desserts, after-school snacks, or super-speedy lunches that will be the envy of the cafeteria, Good Housekeeping Kids Cook! has loads of dishes you’ll love to make and love to eat. But first, take a few minutes to get familiar with these basics.

    1. READ through the entire recipe.

    2. PREHEAT the oven if the recipe says to do so. Set the timer for 15 minutes for the oven to reach the temperature you have set.

    3. WASH your hands in warm, soapy water. Dry them thoroughly so they’re not slippery.

    4. WEAR an apron to protect your clothing and give you a place to quickly wipe your hands. If your shirt has long sleeves, roll them up. If your hair is long, tie it back.

    5. CLEAR an area on the counter to cook. Wipe it down with a clean, damp sponge, then dry it thoroughly.

    6. CLEAN fruits and veggies to remove any sand or grit. Give sturdy produce (like apples, carrots, and celery) a scrub with a soft-bristled brush, and then rinse and drain in a colander. Wash leafy greens and herbs in a salad spinner. Rinse berries in a colander and drain on paper towels.

    7. GATHER all the utensils and ingredients listed in the recipe.

    8. MEASURE out all the ingredients so that they are ready to use as soon as you start the recipe.

    Knife Skills

    You’ll need a knife for practically every recipe in this book, so check with an adult to make sure it’s sharp. (If a knife is dull, it’s more likely to slip or get stuck in what you’re cutting.) Use a wood or plastic cutting board every time you cut. This will protect the surface that you’re working on and keep the blade of the knife from getting damaged. Here’s how to use a knife properly and safely:

    1. CHOOSE a knife that fits comfortably in your hand and doesn’t feel too big.

    2. HOLD the knife firmly by the handle. Make sure the sharp edge of the blade is facing down toward the food you are cutting. You can place your index finger over the top of the blade to help guide the knife.

    3. USE your other hand to hold the food. Curl back your fingertips and thumb to keep them out of harm’s way. Place the flat side of the food onto the cutting board. For round food (like a potato or an apple), you can cut a little slice off to give it a flat bottom. For a long ingredient (like a zucchini or carrot), cut it in half lengthwise first. This keeps the food from rolling away or slipping out of your hand.

    4. START to cut by moving the knife away from your body. Focus on cutting and nothing else—accidents can happen if you’re distracted.

    Essential Knives

    A CHEF’S KNIFE or French knife is an all-purpose knife used for slicing and chopping. A 5-inch knife is a good choice for kids.

    A SERRATED KNIFE is long with “teeth” on the edge, which allows it to cut through baked goods like bread and cake.

    A PARING KNIFE is shorter and used for trimming or peeling fruits and veggies.

    Nutrition by Numbers

    Food naturally contains nutrients—like protein, fat, and carbohydrates—that provide energy. Some nutrients, like fiber and sodium, don’t provide energy but are also important for health. Your body needs the right combination of nutrients to work properly and grow. We’ve included the per-serving amount of each of these nutrients in every recipe so you know what you’re eating.

    Here are some terms to help you read nutritional information:

    Nutrients are weighed in grams (g) and milligrams (mg). One teaspoon of water weighs 5 grams; one teaspoon of sugar weighs about 4 grams.

    CALORIES tell you the total amount of energy in your food and can come from fat, protein, or carbohydrates. The amount of calories you need per day depends on your age, size, and activity level.

    PROTEIN helps your body build and repair muscles, blood, and organs. High-protein foods include meat, poultry, fish, eggs, beans, lentils, nuts, and seeds.

    FAT is an important nutrient that your body uses for growth and development. However, not all fats are the same. Healthy fats include vegetable and nut oils, which provide essential fatty acids and vitamin E. Healthy fat is also naturally found in avocados and seafood. On the other hand, saturated fat, which comes from animal sources like red meat, poultry, and full-fat dairy products, should be limited.

    CARBOHYDRATES are your body’s primary source of energy. You’ll find simple carbohydrates in fruits, vegetables, and milk, as well as some sugars. Complex carbohydrates include whole-grain breads and cereals, starchy vegetables, and legumes (think beans and peanuts). Most complex carbs contain fiber, which makes you feel full and aids digestion.

    SODIUM (translation: salt) is used by our bodies to conduct nerve impulses, contract and relax muscles, and stay hydrated—but you only need it in small amounts. Too much sodium in your diet can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

    Measure It Right

    To ensure a recipe works, a cook needs to measure the ingredients accurately. Here are the essential tools and techniques you’ll need:

    A set of metal or plastic measuring cups includes ¼, ⅓, ½, and 1 cup measures.

    Graduated measuring spoons come as a set of ¼ teaspoon, ½ teaspoon, 1 teaspoon, and 1 tablespoon measures.

    Clear measuring cups with spouts come in a 1-cup, 2-cup, 4-cup, and 8-cup capacity and are marked for measuring smaller amounts. No smaller markings? Use graduated measuring spoons.

    FOR DRY AND SOLID INGREDIENTS

    (LIKE FLOUR, SUGAR, BREAD CRUMBS, AND PEANUT BUTTER)

    SPOON the ingredient into the correct-size metal or plastic measuring cup or spoon. Do not push down on the ingredient to pack it in (unless it’s brown sugar, which should always be firmly packed when measured). Level off the top of the cup or spoon with the straight edge of a knife or spatula.

    FOR WET INGREDIENTS

    (LIKE BROTH, MILK, WATER, AND OIL)

    PLACE the clear measuring cup on a flat surface. Pour the liquid into the cup until it reaches the desired line. Crouch down slightly so the measurement markings are at eye level. To measure a small amount of liquid, pour the liquid into a measuring spoon until it reaches the spoon’s rim.

    Cook’s Lingo

    Ready to start a recipe but not sure what a cooking term means? These simple definitions will help you as you go along!

    BAKE To cook food in an oven, surrounded with dry heat; called “roasting” when applied to meat, poultry, or vegetables.

    BEAT To stir quickly to make a mixture smooth using a whisk, spoon, fork, or mixer.

    BLEND To thoroughly combine two or more ingredients, either by hand, with a whisk or spoon, or with a mixer.

    BOIL To cook in hot, bubbling water that has reached 212°F.

    BROIL To cook on a rack in an oven under direct heat.

    CREAM To beat ingredients, usually sugar and a fat, like butter, until smooth and fluffy.

    DICE To cut food into very small (⅛- to ¼-inch) cubes.

    GRATE To rub foods against a jagged surface to produce shredded or fine bits.

    GRIND To reduce food to tiny pieces using a food processor.

    PUREE To mash or grind food until completely smooth, usually in a food processor, blender, or sieve.

    SHRED To cut food into small, thin strips with a knife or a grater.

    SIMMER To cook in liquid just below the boiling point; bubbles should form but not burst on the surface of the liquid.

    STIR-FRY To quickly cook small pieces of food over high heat, stirring constantly.

    WHISK To beat ingredients (such as heavy cream, eggs, salad dressings, or sauces) with a fork or whisk in order to mix, blend, or add air.

    Keep It Safe to Avoid Belly Aches

    Raw meat, poultry, and seafood can contain germs (better known as bacteria) that can make you sick. So handle them carefully as follows:

    • PAT any meat, poultry (chicken and turkey), or seafood you need in your recipe with paper towels, and then discard used towels. Place meat on a plate or tray and refrigerate until ready to use. Wash your hands afterward.

    • KEEP meats and fish separate from other recipe ingredients. If a recipe calls for both raw meats and veggies, thoroughly wash knives, cutting boards, and utensils with hot soapy water when switching from meat to veggie preparation. Better yet, use separate cutting boards for meats and veggies.

    • STORE all fresh food in the fridge until you are ready to use it.

    • TOSS out any meat, poultry, or fish that looks discolored or smells bad.

    • NEVER taste raw eggs, as they sometimes can contain bacteria, too.

    • THAW frozen meat, poultry, or fish in the fridge overnight—not at room temperature.

    • KEEP cold foods cold and hot foods hot. Perishable food should not be kept at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If you live somewhere warm, discard the food after 1 hour.

    • REFRIGERATE or freeze any leftovers immediately after you’ve finished eating.

    Now that you know the basics, are you ready to get started?

    LET’S COOK!

    1

    Yummy Breakfasts

    Do you have brekkie on the brain? That’s good, because breakfast is the most important meal of the day—especially for someone who’s still growing. Choose from foolproof eggs (plain or fancy), funny bunny pancakes, true-blue berry muffins, and more (we’ve got brunch covered, too!). Your tummy will thank you, and your day will no doubt be off to a strong start.

    CLASSIC CHEESE OMELET

    CRUSTLESS QUICHE LORRAINE

    BAGEL BREAKFAST BAKE

    MEXICAN BREAKFAST CHILAQUILES

    GREEN EGGS & HAM’WICHES

    BUNNY BANANA PANCAKES

    THE ULTIMATE WAFFLES

    TROPICAL SMOOTHIE BOWL

    BERRY-COCONUT SMOOTHIE BOWL

    ORANGE-PEACH SMOOTHIE BOWL

    PEACH MELBA BREAKFAST POPS

    WHOLE-GRAIN BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

    SPICED BANANA-CHOCOLATE MUFFINS

    CARROT MUFFIN BABY BUNDTS

    GRAB ’N’ GO CRANBERRY GRANOLA BARS

    SKILL→ MODERATE

    Classic

    CHEESE OMELET

    Eggs cook super quick. Be sure to have your seasonings and cheese nearby and ready to go so you don’t accidentally overcook your omelet.

    ACTIVE TIME → 15 MINUTES TOTAL TIME → 20 MINUTES MAKES → 4 SERVINGS

    INGREDIENTS

    8 large eggs

    ½ cup water

    ½ teaspoon salt

    ½ teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

    2 tablespoons butter

    4 ounces (½ cup) shredded cheddar or Swiss cheese

    chopped green onions, for garnish

    toasted country-style bread, optional

    EACH SERVING

    Calories: About 315

    Protein: 20G

    Carbohydrates: 2G

    Total Fat: 25G

    (Saturated Fat: 10G)

    Fiber: 0G

    Sodium: 670MG

    1. Preheat oven to 200°F. Place 4 dinner plates in oven to warm. In medium bowl, place eggs, water, salt, and pepper. With fork, beat mixture with 25 to 30 quick strokes to blend without making it fluffy. (Overbeating toughens the proteins in the egg whites.)

    2. In an 8-inch nonstick skillet, melt 1½ teaspoons butter over medium heat until hot. When butter stops sizzling, pour or ladle ½ cup egg mixture into skillet.

    3. After egg mixture begins to set around edges (about 25 to 30 seconds), carefully push cooked egg from side of skillet toward center with heat-safe spatula so uncooked egg can reach bottom of hot skillet. Repeat 8 to 10 times around skillet, tilting as necessary, for 1 to 1½ minutes.

    4. Cook until omelet is almost set but still creamy and moist on top. Place skillet handle facing you, and sprinkle ¼ cup cheese on half of omelet.

    5. With spatula, fold uncovered half over filling.

    6. Shake pan gently to loosen any egg or filling from edge, then slide omelet to edge of skillet. Holding skillet above warm plate, tip skillet so omelet slides onto plate. Keep warm in oven. Repeat with remaining butter, egg mixture, and cheese to make 4 omelets total. Sprinkle with green onions and serve with toast, if using.

    SKILL→ EASY

    Crustless

    QUICHE LORRAINE

    Pair this quiche with a green salad, and you’ve got a quick and easy brunch.

    ACTIVE TIME → 15 MINUTES TOTAL TIME → 20 MINUTES MAKES → 4 SERVINGS

    INGREDIENTS

    6 large eggs

    ¼ cup whole milk

    ⅛ teaspoon salt

    ⅛ teaspoon ground black pepper

    4 ounces (½ cup) shredded Gruyère or Swiss cheese

    1 teaspoon olive oil

    3 slices thick-cut bacon, chopped

    1 medium shallot, thinly sliced

    snipped fresh chives, optional

    EACH SERVING

    Calories: About 360

    Protein: 22G

    Carbohydrates: 3G

    Total Fat: 29G

    (Saturated Fat: 12G)

    Fiber: 0G

    Sodium: 555MG

    1. Preheat oven to 375°F.

    2. In large bowl with wire whisk, beat eggs, milk, salt, and pepper until combined; stir in cheese.

    3. In 8-inch oven-safe nonstick skillet, heat oil over medium heat until hot. Add bacon and shallot. Cook for 6 minutes, or until bacon is crisp, stirring occasionally. Add eggs to skillet. Cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, to form curds and allow runny egg to flow to bottom of pan.

    4. Bake for 8 minutes or until top is set. Garnish with chives, if using.

    HOW TO: WORK WITH EGGS

    Before you whip up eggs, here are a few things you need to know:

    SIZE Eggs are sold in different sizes. Our recipes call for large eggs, which are important for recipes like pancakes and baked items. If you’re making scrambled or fried eggs, any size will do.

    CRACKING Hold an egg in one hand. Gently but firmly tap the middle of the shell against the rim of a bowl until the shell cracks. Holding the egg over the bowl, pull the shell apart until the egg falls into the bowl.

    SAFETY Start with chilled eggs (they should not sit out at room temperature more than 2 hours), and be sure to cook them until the whites are solid.

    SKILL → EASY

    Bagel

    BREAKFAST BAKE

    We know you’ll love everything about this bacon-egg-and-bagel casserole. It’s the perfect make-ahead dish for Sunday morning.

    ACTIVE TIME → 10 MINUTES TOTAL TIME → 1 HOUR 15 MINUTES (PLUS CHILLING AND COOLING) MAKES → 6 SERVINGS

    INGREDIENTS

    4 “everything” bagels, toasted and chopped

    6 large eggs

    2 cups whole milk

    4 ounces shredded Monterey Jack cheese (½ cup)

    4 slices cooked bacon, finely chopped

    4 green onions, sliced

    ½ teaspoon salt

    ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

    EACH SERVING

    Calories: About 385

    Protein: 21G

    Carbohydrates: 39G

    Total Fat: 16G

    (Saturated Fat: 17G)

    Fiber: 2G

    Sodium: 805MG

    1. Arrange bagels in 2- to 2½-quart baking dish.

    2. In large bowl with wire whisk, beat eggs, milk, Monterey Jack, bacon, green onions, salt, and pepper. Pour over bagels, pressing down slightly to submerge. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour or up to overnight.

    3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Uncover dish and bake for 45 to 55 minutes or until center is set.

    4. Cool for 15 minutes before serving.

    HOW TO: COOK BACON

    Grab a skillet and a pair of tongs, and follow these steps for crispy bacon every time.

    1. ARRANGE sliced bacon in one layer in cold skillet.

    2. SET the skillet over medium heat. When the bacon starts to crisp up and curl, loosen the slices with tongs.

    3. TURN over each slice; cook, turning occasionally, until the bacon browns evenly.

    4. DRAIN the bacon on paper towels. (If you’re cooking lots of bacon, carefully pour the bacon fat into a small bowl after each batch.)

    SKILL → EASY

    Mexican

    BREAKFAST CHILAQUILES

    This sizzling skillet scramble is like having nachos in the morning.

    ACTIVE TIME → 15 MINUTES TOTAL TIME → 20 MINUTES (PLUS CHILLING AND COOLING) MAKES → 4 SERVINGS

    INGREDIENTS

    6 large eggs

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    1½ teaspoons vegetable oil

    1 bag (5 ounces) tortilla chips

    1 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese

    ¼ cup pickled jalapeño slices

    1 ripe avocado, thinly sliced

    1 cup pico de gallo

    2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped

    sour cream and lime wedges, optional

    EACH SERVING

    Calories: About 360

    Protein: 19G

    Carbohydrates: 36G

    Total Fat: 32G

    (Saturated Fat: 9G)

    Fiber: 6G

    S

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