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    Copyright © 2016 by Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Inc.

    All rights reserved.

    Published in the United States by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, New York.

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    marthastewart.com

    CLARKSON POTTER is a trademark and POTTER with colophon is a registered trademark of Penguin Random House LLC.

    ISBN 9780307954442

    eBook ISBN 9780307954459

    Cover photograph by Ngoc Minh Ngo

    Photo credits

    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

    Names: Stewart, Martha. | Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia.

    Title: Martha Stewart’s vegetables / the editors of Martha Stewart living.

    Other titles: Vegetables

    Description: First edition. | New York : Clarkson Potter/Publishers [2016] |

    Identifiers: LCCN 2016000894 (print) | LCCN 2015045146 (ebook) | ISBN 9780307954459 (ebook) | ISBN 9780307954442 (hardcover) | ISBN 9780307954459 (eBook)

    Subjects: LCSH: Cooking (Vegetables). | LCGFT: Cookbooks.

    Classification: LCC TX801 (print) | LCC TX801 .M294 2016 (ebook) | DDC—dc23

    LC record available at http://lccn.loc.gov/2016000894

    v4.1

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    To the numerous excellent professional seed companies, whose catalogs and seeds permit us to learn about and to grow extraordinary vegetables.

    And to seed-saving individuals and organizations, who are maintaining essential biodiversity—so important to keeping the “business” of vegetables and vegetable-growing interesting and inspiring.

    CONTENTS

    RECIPES BY CHAPTER

    FOREWORD

    BULBS

    * * *

    GARLIC

    LEEKS

    ONIONS

    RAMPS

    SCALLIONS

    SHALLOTS

    SPRING ONIONS

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    ROOTS

    * * *

    BEETS

    CARROTS

    CELERY ROOT

    JICAMA

    PARSNIPS

    RADISHES

    RUTABAGA

    SALSIFY

    TURNIPS

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    TUBERS

    * * *

    JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES

    POTATOES

    SWEET POTATOES

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    GREENS

    * * *

    BEET GREENS

    BOK CHOY

    BROCCOLI RABE

    CHARD

    COLLARDS

    KALE

    MUSTARD GREENS

    TURNIP GREENS

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    STALKS & STEMS

    * * *

    ASPARAGUS

    CELERY

    FENNEL

    KOHLRABI

    RHUBARB

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    PODS

    * * *

    EDAMAME

    ENGLISH PEAS

    FAVA BEANS

    GREEN BEANS

    OKRA

    SHELL BEANS

    SNAP PEAS

    SNOW PEAS

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    SHOOTS

    * * *

    FIDDLEHEAD FERNS

    MICROGREENS

    PEA SHOOTS

    SPROUTS

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    LEAVES

    * * *

    CABBAGES

    CHICORIES

    ENDIVES

    LETTUCES

    SPINACH

    SPRING AND WILD GREENS

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    FLOWERS & BUDS

    * * *

    ARTICHOKES

    BROCCOLI

    BRUSSELS SPROUTS

    CAULIFLOWER

    CHIVE BLOSSOMS

    EDIBLE FLOWERS

    SQUASH BLOSSOMS

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    FRUITS

    * * *

    AVOCADOS

    CUCUMBERS

    EGGPLANTS

    PEPPERS AND CHILES

    SUMMER SQUASHES

    TOMATILLOS

    TOMATOES

    WINTER SQUASHES

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    KERNELS

    * * *

    CORN

    THE BASICS

    THE RECIPES

    PHOTO CREDITS

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    INDEX

    RECIPES BY CHAPTER

    BULBS

    Four-Onion Soup with Ginger

    Spaghetti with Mussels, Lemon, and Shallots

    Roast Chicken with Onions, Shallots, Garlic, and Scapes

    Israeli Couscous with Parsley and Shallots

    Beer-Battered Onion Rings

    Normandy-Style Chicken and Leeks with Crème Fraîche

    Pasta Carbonara with Leeks and Lemon

    Roasted Salmon and Spring Onions

    Pickled Ramps

    Grilled Ramps with Romesco

    Steamed Black Bass with Ginger and Scallions

    Rice Noodles with Scallions and Herbs

    Garlic-Scape Toasts

    Green-Garlic Butter

    Herb-and-Scallion Bread Pudding

    Gazpacho Ajo Blanco

    Creamy Garlic, Parsley, and Feta Dressing

    ROOTS

    Roasted Beet and Potato Borscht

    Sesame Carrot Slaw

    Beet Salad with Ginger Dressing

    Beet Risotto with Beet Greens

    Spicy Carrot Soup

    Celery Root and Potato Rösti

    Roasted Carrots and Quinoa with Miso Dressing

    Jicama-Citrus Salad

    Rainbow Carrots and Chard

    Lacquered Short Ribs with Celery Root Purée

    Leek and Parsnip Soup

    Salsify Gratin

    Radish Tartine

    Roasted Radishes with Capers and Anchovies

    Moroccan Vegetable Soup

    Rutabaga-Apple Mash

    Turnip Salad with Bacon Vinaigrette

    Brisket with Parsnips and Carrots

    Roasted Rutabaga and Brussels Sprouts

    Carrot Fries

    Spiced Parsnip Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting

    TUBERS

    Potato Salad, Three Ways

    Potato Gnocchi

    Mrs. Kostyra’s Mashed Potatoes

    Salt-Baked Potatoes, Shallots, and Chestnuts

    Lamb Stew with Jerusalem Artichokes

    Tartiflette

    Twice-Cooked Potato and Leek Casserole

    Yukon Gold and Sweet Potatoes Anna

    Salmon Chowder

    Roasted Pork Chops with Sweet Potatoes and Apples

    Potato Yeasted Rolls, Two Ways

    GREENS

    Sesame Greens

    Swiss Chard, Cabbage, and Brussels Sprouts Salad

    Fried Rice with Collard Greens

    Stuffed Collard Greens

    Mustard-Greens Pesto

    Mustard-Greens Caesar Salad

    Skillet Pizza with Greens and Eggplant

    Caldo Verde

    Kale Chips with Balsamic Glaze

    Kale-Ricotta Dip

    Swiss Chard Lasagna

    Bok Choy Salad with Cashews

    Baby Bok Choy with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger

    Broccoli Rabe and Ham Croque Monsieurs

    Kale and Avocado Salad with Dates

    Chard-Tomato Sauté

    Orecchiette with Broccoli Rabe and Tomatoes

    STALKS & STEMS

    Steamed Asparagus, Three Ways

    Egg, Asparagus, and Mushroom Stir-Fry

    Asparagus and Potato Flatbread

    Rhubarb Chutney with Pork Roast

    Asparagus, Artichoke, and Farro Salad

    Fennel and Smoked Salmon Salad

    Clam Pan Roast with Fennel and Sausage

    Celery, Cilantro, and Almond Salad

    Braised Celery

    PODS

    Blanched Sugar Snap Peas, Three Ways

    Risi e Bisi

    Green-Pea Burgers with Harissa Mayo

    Cranberry Bean Salad with Delicata Squash and Broccoli Rabe

    Skillet Edamame, Corn, and Tomatoes with Basil Oil

    Roasted Wax Beans with Peanuts and Cilantro

    Green Bean, Shell Bean, and Sweet Onion Fattoush

    White Beans with Dandelion Greens and Crostini

    Grilled Fava Beans

    Creamy Fava Beans

    Beef and Snap-Pea Stir-Fry

    Green Bean and Watercress Salad

    Tempura Green Beans

    Quick-Pickled Pods

    SHOOTS

    Sesame Salmon with Shiitake Mushrooms and Shoots

    Fiddlehead and Potato Hash with Eggs

    Kale and Lentil Bowl with Sprouts

    Sautéed Snow Peas and Pea Shoots

    Avocado-and-Sprout Club Sandwiches

    Pad Thai

    LEAVES

    Watercress and Asparagus Pizza

    Endive and Fennel Salad

    Shredded Napa Cabbage Salad

    Pork Scaloppine with Radicchio

    Spinach and Fontina Strata

    Garden Greens with Chopped Eggs

    Spinach and Garlic Soup

    Escarole and Bean Soup

    Frisée and Roasted Pear Salad

    Baby Greens with Pine Nuts and Pancetta

    Arugula and Stone Fruit Salad with Balsamic Lamb Chops

    Fig and Arugula Crostini

    Charred Romaine Salad

    Free-Form Lasagna with Edible Weeds

    Braised Red Cabbage

    Creamed Green Cabbage

    Fried Chicken with Puntarelle Salad

    Mini Asian Meatballs in Lettuce Cups

    FLOWERS & BUDS

    Nasturtium Salad with Artichokes and Asparagus

    Bucatini with Cauliflower, Capers, and Lemon

    Oven-Fried Baby Artichokes

    Smoky Brussels Sprouts Gratin

    Broiled Striped Bass with Cauliflower and Capers

    Roasted Cauliflower with Herb Sauce

    Crisped Brussels Sprout Leaves

    Squash-Blossom Frittata

    Goat Cheese with Edible Flowers and Arugula

    Broccoli, Shrimp, and Shiitake Stir-Fry

    Braised Chicken and Brussels Sprouts

    Capellini with Chive Blossoms

    Roasted Broccoli with Grated Manchego

    FRUITS

    Pasta with Marinated Heirloom Tomatoes

    Blistered Eggplant with Tomatoes, Olives, and Feta

    Miso Eggplant

    Breaded Eggplant with Arugula and Parmesan

    Tomato and Mango Salad

    Zucchini-Scallion Fritters

    Pasta with Zucchini, Mint, and Pecorino

    Zucchini Quick Bread

    Skillet Steak Peperonata

    Pickled Jalapeños and Cucumbers

    Blistered Padrón Peppers with Sea Salt

    Whole Baked Trout with Cherry Tomatoes and Potatoes

    Zucchini “Pasta” Primavera

    Roasted Bell Peppers

    Tomatillo and Chipotle Salsa

    Chiles Rellenos

    Cucumber, Mango, and Shrimp Escabèche

    Chilled Melon, Cucumber, and Mint Soup

    Stuffed Tomatoes with Mozzarella

    Salmon and Avocado Tartines

    Pistachio Guacamole

    Roasted-Tomato Hand Pies

    Butternut Squash and Taleggio Pizza

    Roasted Acorn Squash, Three Ways

    Butternut Squash and Kale Hash

    KERNELS

    Grilled Corn, with Three Toppings

    Corn and Scallion Chilaquiles

    Corn Soup

    Hatch Chile Corn Pudding

    Cornmeal Shortcakes with Corn Ice Cream and Blueberry Compote

    FOREWORD

    When I think about vegetables, in the context of a “subject matter,” say for a book such as this, I think of the provocative book by Lynne Truss: Eats, Shoots & Leaves. That book, on the subject of punctuation and grammar, has the effect of making one want to rearrange the title to Eats Shoots & Leaves, which of course has an entirely different meaning. It also brings to mind a few categories of vegetables. Roots, Shoots & Leaves, in fact, could have been the title of this book.

    This book is about all kinds of vegetables, and it is full of all kinds of recipes we’ve developed to prepare those vegetables in the most savory and delightful ways. Everyone in the kitchens of Martha Stewart Living contributed to the content, and the expertise of our editors is evident on page after page—in the choosing of the types of vegetables, in determining the appropriate freshness of those delicious gifts from garden and farm, and in the serving and enjoying of even some very usual varieties.

    There are almost infinite ways to enjoy vegetables, and we have divided the edible plant world into big chapters to lure you into trying and experimenting in many different ways with bulbs, roots, tubers, leaves, shoots, kernels, pods, stalks and stems, greens, flowers and buds, and even fruits. Why fruits? Tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, cucumbers, avocados, zucchini, and other squashes are all, botanically, fruits. The scientific reason for dividing in this way is not very complicated, and it is fascinating to think about each “vegetable” and learn the correct taxonomy.

    Children, as much as adults, are fascinated with such distinctions, and it is true that cooks and our culinary traditions have clouded the categories. In any event, the recipes in this book treat both vegetables and fruits in delicious, savory, memorable ways. Enjoy as many of these recipes as you can.

    BULBS

    GARLIC

    * * *

    LEEKS

    * * *

    ONIONS

    * * *

    RAMPS

    * * *

    SCALLIONS

    * * *

    SHALLOTS

    * * *

    SPRING

    ONIONS

    As Julia Child wrote, “It’s hard to imagine a civilization without onions.” Open any cookbook and you’ll see she’s right. Alliums (the botanical genus includes edible bulbs such as shallots, garlic, onions, and ramps, plus those with edible leaves like leeks, scallions, and chives) season many favorite dishes. And thanks to the proliferation of farmers’ markets, we now have access to a wider range of these aromatic gems. What’s more, in many places, early varieties start appearing weeks after the thaw. Clearly, these bulbs are worth celebrating. But, because they are ubiquitous, long lasting, and fairly cheap, we have the luxury of taking them for granted.

    Like other underground vegetables, including roots and tubers, bulbs of the allium family stockpile the energy and nutrients absorbed from the sun and earth. But bulbs store them primarily as sugars, not carbohydrates, which may explain why they go to such lengths to defend their treasures. Inside each cell, thanks to one of nature’s most brilliant defense systems, sulfur compounds are kept segregated from the enzymes that trigger them, divided by thin membranes; when the cells are broken—when you slice or bite into an onion, for example—the chemicals combine, creating the volatile gases that can make you cry.

    Sulfur and sugar: the harsh married to the sweet. It is precisely this intriguing balance that makes bulbs so delicious—and essential. These alliums lend a framework to other flavors, bringing structure and flavor to dishes—and perhaps even civilizations—the world over.

    THE BASICS

    SEASONALITY

    Because onions and garlic are available year-round, it’s easy to think they don’t have a season. But spring is when they push their tender green shoots up from the earth and begin forming a new generation of bulbs below. From March through May, seek out tender young onions, garlic, and their kin at farmers’ markets—all are mild and excellent eaten raw.

    Sweet onions, such as Walla Walla, and storage onions are left to continue growing underground through the summer and into fall; you can also find excellent examples of these at farmers’ markets. For garlic to produce the cloves we all know and love, the flower buds, or scapes, must be harvested in spring. Green garlic, which could be mistaken for an overgrown scallion, has a mild flavor that’s brighter and fresher tasting than regular cloves. And lucky for us, these springtime delicacies are readily available at farmers’ markets and specialty grocers during the spring and early summer.

    Ramps, also known as wild leeks, are foraged from shaded, woody areas up and down the East Coast, from Georgia to Canada, and are heralded for their garlicky flavor. Their many fans eagerly await their first appearance at farmers’ markets, where you can find them from March through early June (though you can also cultivate your own).

    BUYING

    Common onions and garlic are “cured”—harvested when fully mature, then dried for storage. Hardiness is key when selecting these vegetables, so at the market, give them a (very gentle) squeeze. Also, avoid bruises and mold, and shun dampness—the skins should be papery and dry. Select yellow onions for long braises and high-heat cooking; they have the strongest, richest flavor, and will hold up no matter what they’re paired with. White onions are slightly milder, and common in Mexican and South American dishes. Tamer still are red onions, with a touch of sweetness, making them the best choice for salads, sandwiches, and other dishes where they’ll be eaten raw. Among the first vegetables to appear at farmers’ markets after the snow melts, young, green-leafed bulbs—including scallions and ramps, as well as spring onions and garlic scapes—are a welcome sight; look for bunches whose greens are firm and stiff, their bulbs bright and glossy.

    NOTABLE VARIETIES

    Onions: White, yellow, and red are grocery-store staples, but it’s worth seeking out Vidalia and Walla Walla onions, the sweetest ones of all (especially when grown in sulfur-free soil, where they absorb none of the sharpness common to other varieties). Spring onions, planted in the fall and harvested before the bulbs have had a chance to grow (in early spring, hence their name), can be found at farm stands starting in March; they are milder and sweeter than storage onions when cooked, with a notable spiciness that makes them wonderful for grilling and pickling. They resemble scallions but have a larger bulb.

    Scallions: Look for purple-bulb varieties in the spring; they have the same flavor as white ones, but make a pretty garnish.

    Garlic: The garlic sold in grocery stores is intended for long storage rather than flavor, making it worth the trip to the farmers’ market to find other varieties that are usually only available from small growers. These local heads should have larger cloves and a more pronounced flavor. They are sometimes sold still on the stalks, and some have purple stripes or a reddish hue.

    STORING

    Dark, cool, and dry is how cured bulbs like it, so store onions, shallots, and garlic on an out-of-the way shelf or in a cabinet. Light causes them to sprout, generating green tendrils within that draw nutrients and flavor from the bulb; moisture can cause mold to form beneath the skin (which can be wiped off) or between the layers of the bulb (where it can’t be). Leeks, spring onions, ramps, and scallions, meanwhile, should be refrigerated, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag, and used within a few days.

    PREPPING

    Learning to cut onions quickly and skillfully is one of the smartest things novice cooks can do to make kitchen life more agreeable. Remove the papery skin (it’s called the tunic!), and unless you want rings, slice the onion in half from top to root. Lay each half flat on the board and slice into the bulb first lengthwise (leaving root intact), then crosswise. If you plan to serve onions raw—in a salad, say, or on a sandwich—you may want to first soak the pieces for five to ten minutes in an ice-water bath to remove the sulfur compounds generated on cut surfaces, or give them a brief soak in vinegar. For garlic, remove the paper sheath by gently crushing each clove with the side of a knife blade, then pull off the paper; remove any green “germ” from the cloves, as these are very bitter.

    Leeks, ramps, scallions, and green garlic often need to have their tunics peeled away, too—and as these are fragile and clingy, they may require scraping with the edge of a paring knife. Then cut away the scruffy roots and slice if needed, separating the stronger-flavored white parts from the green, if the recipe requires (most do). Leeks hold onto a lot of grit in their many thick layers; cut them as directed in a recipe, then submerge in a bowl of cold water and swish thoroughly. Lift out the leeks, and repeat until you don’t see any more grit in the water. Drain and dry if sautéing or roasting.

    COOKING

    With a high proportion of sugars, onions take well to being caramelized. Indeed, you can grill or roast them until nearly black before their flavor is ruined. But they are equally happy cooked low and slow—gently sautéed in butter or olive oil, or oven-braised in a skillet. These are also the best methods for cooking delicate-flavored leeks, ramps, and scallions, which all take well to a quick pass through a hot flame, giving them a dramatic charred flavor that pairs well with meat. Ramps are excellent mixed into pestos and compound butters; sautéed and tossed with spaghetti or served over soft polenta; or treated like herbs and tucked under the skin of chicken before roasting.

    As with onions, garlic’s multiple personalities are highlighted by different cooking techniques: Mince or smash raw cloves to add an assertive bite to salad dressings, pestos, salsas and relishes, and no-cook pasta sauces; sauté them until pale golden in butter or oil for a flavor that’s mild and mellow; roast a whole head in the oven until it turns mahogany brown for cloves that are buttery soft, rich, sweet, and earthy—and then spread the paste on bread, toss it with pasta, or incorporate it into dips and sauces.

    HOW TO ROAST

    (For all bulbs)

    Peel onions and shallots; quarter onions, leaving wedges intact, and separate shallots (halve larger ones, if desired). Trim scallions, leeks, spring onions, green garlic, and ramps; leave whole or cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces (wash leeks well). Place on a rimmed baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Strew onions and shallots with fresh thyme or rosemary, if desired. Spread in an even layer and roast at 400°F, tossing once or twice, until tender and browned in spots, 15 to 20 minutes. Drizzle with vinegar (balsamic, cider, sherry, or white wine), and sprinkle with herbs.

    (For garlic cloves)

    Separate garlic cloves, and place on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Roast at 400°F until skins are deep golden brown and flesh is very tender, 20 to 30 minutes.

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