Tart It Up! by Eric Lanlard [download good books]


  • Full Title : Tart It Up!: Sweet and Savoury Tarts and Pies. Eric Lanlard
  • Autor: Eric Lanlard
  • Print Length: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Mitchell Beazley
  • Publication Date: July 1, 2012
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845337190
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845336905
  • Download File Format: azw3

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Pies and tarts are the ultimate comfort food. Whether sweet or savoury, elegant or hearty, they are great for relaxed entertaining, family get-togethers and even weekday suppers. In this irresistible book Eric Lanlard, AKA Cake Boy, demonstrates how to make the best pastry and shares his favourite recipes for sweet and savoury tarts and pies. His recipes include classics with a twist plus ideas inspired by his travels, using deliciously imaginative flavour combinations. In the first part of the book, Pastry Basics, Eric shares his professional expertise and provides step-by-step instructions for making every type of pastry – shortcrust (sweet and savoury), puff, almond, chocolate and brioche. There is a wealth of helpful baking hints to ensure a great bake every time. Savoury Tarts & Pies features such classics as a ‘Proper’ Quiche Lorraine and a Cider and Pork Pie plus attention-grabbing treats including Fig, Lardon and Dolce Latte Tart and Lamb and Moroccan Spice Pie. The chapter ends with a selection of quick bakes using ready-roll pastry (for when time is short) and a delicious collection of accompaniments including salsas, chutneys and vegetable side dishes. Sweet Tarts & Pies will bring some of Eric’s trademark glamour to the dessert course – including a Strawberry Tart ‘Royal’, Exotic Fruit Meringue Crumble Pie and an Apricot, Honey and Pistachio Tart. Sweet pies include an Old-fashioned Apple Pie, Ginger Pear Frangipane Pie and a Classic Blueberry Pie. Once again there is a selection of quick bakes for desserts in a dash and a choice of accompaniments, including flavoured creams, spiced fruits and the perfect Creme Anglais. With foolproof recipes for tarts and pies that look and taste great, this wonderful book is a great way to bring some of Eric’s culinary magic into your kitchen every time you bake.

 

Pies and tarts are the ultimate comfort food. Whether sweet or savoury, elegant or hearty, they are great for relaxed entertaining, family get-togethers and even weekday suppers. In this irresistible book Eric Lanlard, AKA Cake Boy, demonstrates how to make the best pastry and shares his favourite recipes for sweet and savoury tarts and pies. His recipes include classics with a twist plus ideas inspired by his travels, using deliciously imaginative flavour combinations. In the first part of the book, Pastry Basics, Eric shares his professional expertise and provides step-by-step instructions for making every type of pastry – shortcrust (sweet and savoury), puff, almond, chocolate and brioche. There is a wealth of helpful baking hints to ensure a great bake every time. Savoury Tarts & Pies features such classics as a ‘Proper’ Quiche Lorraine and a Cider and Pork Pie plus attention-grabbing treats including Fig, Lardon and Dolce Latte Tart and Lamb and Moroccan Spice Pie. The chapter ends with a selection of quick bakes using ready-roll pastry (for when time is short) and a delicious collection of accompaniments including salsas, chutneys and vegetable side dishes. Sweet Tarts & Pies will bring some of Eric’s trademark glamour to the dessert course – including a Strawberry Tart ‘Royal’, Exotic Fruit Meringue Crumble Pie and an Apricot, Honey and Pistachio Tart. Sweet pies include an Old-fashioned Apple Pie, Ginger Pear Frangipane Pie and a Classic Blueberry Pie. Once again there is a selection of quick bakes for desserts in a dash and a choice of accompaniments, including flavoured creams, spiced fruits and the perfect Creme Anglais. With foolproof recipes for tarts and pies that look and taste great, this wonderful book is a great way to bring some of Eric’s culinary magic into your kitchen every time you bake.

>>>Download<<<

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for all his

answered some basic food questions. Sarah Black of Fairway

advice and support and, of course, for making the deal.

Markets was a font of information about baking, and Tod

And finally, but also first and foremost, there’s the

Bramble of King Arthur Flour gave me useful tips. Also,

A Team: Christopher Hirsheimer, whose delicious and

my sincere appreciation to those chefs and authors whose

evocative photographs don’t just illustrate this volume but

recipes I’ve adapted or drawn on for inspiration without

bring it alive, and her colleague Melissa Hamilton, who, with

them having realized it.

Christopher, made sense out of some of the most challenging

A number of writers, poets, and scholars generously

recipes in this volume and elegantly refined some of the

shared their knowledge and insights with me, including

simplest. Couldn’t have done it without you, guys.

3FOREWORD#

For many years, visitors to Ireland praised the quality of the

Colman’s tasteful curatorial eye is observant and eclectic,

produce but despaired when they tasted the end result on

almost magpielike; he has chosen the best and most interest-

the plate. A lot has changed in Ireland. The produce is still

ing sweetmeats to present. He’s been extremely thorough in

beautiful, and becoming ever more so as people go back to

his research, too. But although I love the mixture of esoteric

organic farming, buying locally and seasonally, and living

recipes with simple country dishes like prawns on brown

gently off the land. We’ve gone from a nation for whom

bread and Mary Ward’s secret recipe for Christmas pudding

“local” was a derogatory word to one in which farmers’

(reason alone to buy the book!), my favorite parts of this

markets are flourishing around the country. And you know,

book are the delightfully interwoven snippets of country

locally grown and prepared food never really went away, as

life he’s captured in his historical research, interviews with

Colman Andrews has discovered. The “local” that people

artisans, and vignettes of country house hotels. Colman sees

talk about in yearning tones elsewhere is something we still

the potential of the new generation of Irish artisan food

have right under our noses. We spend a lot of time agitat-

producers—farmhouse cheese and butter makers, meat

ing for the preservation of our traditional food culture, and

curers, fish smokers, home bakers, and jam makers—to

mourn keenly the loss of each small butcher or baker who

attract tourism. He recognizes the ways in which tradition

shuts up shop. But Colman makes us see afresh the value of

and modernity have combined to form a progressive way

what we’ve managed to maintain—which is a lot, actually—

forward for Ireland.

and helps us understand the great urgency of fighting to

Colman, with his global perspective and vast knowledge

preserve it.

of different food cultures, has looked in and seen how we

I’ve been going to America for twenty years now, and

are, and this book is an unprecedented celebration of what

I can’t believe how many times I’ve had to emphasize that

he’s observed. I’m so glad that things have come full circle.

we don’t just live on corned beef, potatoes, and cabbage

in Ireland. Colman, more clearly than most, can see the

Darina Allen

evolution and the revolution that has taken place in Irish

ballymaloe cookery school

food and transmits that here in a clear and charming way.

shanagarry, county cork

about the recipes

A Note on Metric Conversions

In selecting recipes for this book, I’ve defined “country

For the convenience of readers who use metric measure-

cooking” broadly: Basically, I’ve considered as fair game

ments, quantity and temperature equivalents have been given

anything from Ireland that isn’t exclusive to or strongly asso-

in the recipes that follow. Please note that the conversions

ciated with either of the island’s two major cities, Dublin

are approximate and have been rounded off for reasons of

and Belfast (there is one exception to this; see page 150)—

practicality (1 pound of weight, for instance, has been trans-

cities whose food is rich fodder for another kind of book

lated as 500 grams, not 454, which would be more accurate;

entirely. Included are recipes for traditional dishes—among

an oven temperature of 400°F becomes 200°C, not the more

them all the basics, including several versions each of those

precise 204°C). In one case, for butter, two different equiva-

definitive culinary creations, Irish stew and soda bread—

lents are used: 220 grams per cup for baking (close enough

but also for home cooking of the twentieth and twenty-first

to the actual equivalent, 213 grams, to avoid changing the

centuries, archaic dishes drawn from manuscripts dating

consistency of the baked item), 250 grams for cooking (an

back as far as the early eighteenth century, and modern

easier measure, for cases where precision is less important).

Irish creations from contemporary country-house hotels

Diameter and volume measurements for pots and baking

and regional restaurants. Some of the recipes here are amal-

dishes correspond to sizes that are actually available (e.g., a

gams of several (or many), based on my own research and

2-quart vessel becomes a 2-liter one).

eating experiences in Ireland. Others come straight from a

single source, whether cook or chef, manuscript or book,

even the occasional Web site. I have always identified the

source or inspiration where there is only one or where one

predominates. To be fair to those sources and inspirations,

though, I should note that there is not a single recipe herein

that appears exactly as it did in the original material. I’ve

adapted, streamlined, filled out, and rewritten as necessary.

Any infelicities or inauthenticities that may appear—and I

hope they are few—are thus mine alone.

A Note on Ingredients

Bacon means conventional American bacon (which the Irish

Fruit and vegetables are medium or standard size and are

and British call “streaky bacon”), preferably a premium

always washed, trimmed, and peeled, as necessary, before

brand such as Nueske’s, Niman Ranch, Applegate Farms, or

using, unless otherwise specified.

Nodine’s. Irish bacon means Irish or Irish-style back bacon,

Herbs—in sprigs or chopped up—are always fresh unless

preferably Galtee’s sliced cured pork loin, Tommy Moloney’s otherwise specified. There is one exception: Bay leaves are mild-cured (not smoked or back rashers), or Donnelly’s (see

dried but whole.

Sources, page 369). The word “bacon” in some recipe titles

refers to cured pork loin; in those cases, pork loin is specified Milk means whole milk, unless buttermilk (which is by defi-in the ingredients list.

nition reduced in fat) is specified.

Butter means unsalted butter, preferably Kerrygold from

Pepper should be good quality coarse-ground black pepper,

Ireland (now widely available in American supermarkets),

either packaged or freshly ground, unless otherwise

which has a richness and elastic texture particularly suited

specified.

to these recipes. Kerrygold is most often sold in the United

Salt should be fine-ground sea salt or kosher salt.

States in ½-lb/220-g (16-Tbsp) bars. It is also available by

mail order (see Sources, page 369).

Spices are always ground, unless otherwise specified, with the

exception of cloves, which are whole.

Eggs are large (about 2 oz/60 g each) and should be fresh.

Use organic eggs if possible.

Sugar is standard granulated sugar, unless powdered, super-

fine (known in the United Kingdom as “castor sugar”), or

Flour types are specified in ingredients lists. Whole wheat

brown sugar is specified. Brown sugar should be unrefined,

flour should be Irish or Irish-style if possible, and in any

like Demerara or turbinado.

case, stone-ground flour (organic if possible) is preferred.

White flour should also be Irish if possible, and unbleached

Unless otherwise specified, all ingredients should be brought

and organic are always preferable. (See Sources on page 369

to room temperature before using.

for information on where to get Irish flour.) Do not use self-

rising flour unless specified. Soft unbleached pastry flour

(not cake flour) is a workable substitute for Irish white flour

in baking recipes. In recipes calling for a small amount of

flour for thickening soups and stews, frying, dusting, etc.,

any good-quality white flour, preferably unbleached, may

be used.

a note on geopolitics

As early as the sixth century a.d., Ireland was divided into

that has greatly benefited the whole island. The spirit of

five provinces, called cúigí, or “fifths.” These were (to give

cross-border cooperation since then has affected most

them their English names) Ulster, Leinster, Connacht,

aspects of Irish life, including the agricultural and touristic,

Munster, and Mide, the last of which was later subsumed,

and by extension the culinary.

mostly into Leinster. In the centuries following the Norman

Terminology remains tricky. In the pages that follow,

invasion of Ireland in the twelfth century, these provinces

when I refer simply to Ireland or to “the island,” I am talk-

became divided, little by little, into counties—thirty-two of

ing about the entire land mass as a cultural (and/or culinary)

them eventually. Some boundaries and county names have

whole. “Northern Ireland,” with the n capitalized, means

changed over time, a few old counties have been grafted

the country that is part of the United Kingdom. Because

onto others, and in recent years, two counties—Tipperary

Northern Ireland is not the northernmost entity on the

and Dublin—have been further subdivided for adminis-

island, though—Ireland’s County Donegal reaches higher

trative purposes. Thirty-two traditional names are still in

than Northern Ireland’s northern edge—“northern Ireland”

common use, however, and most evoke strong cultural and

with a lowercase n means the northern part of the land mass,

historical associations. For that reason, in almost all cases in

including portions of both countries. One of the terms of

the pages that follow, when I mention a town or city, I link

that historic 1998 agreement grants residents of Northern

it to its county.

Ireland the right to describe themselves as British, Irish,

Those thirty-two counties, though, are divided between

or both. By including their county within “Ireland” in the

two countries: Ireland or Éire (sometimes incorrectly called

broad sense of the word, I certainly mean no disrespect to

the Republic of Ireland, which is its official description but

those who have chosen the first of those alternatives.

not its name) and Northern Ireland, which is a part of the

A more difficult issue is how to refer to one of North-

United Kingdom and has a large population of English and

ern Ireland’s counties and major cities: It is Londonderry to

Scottish descent. The British Crown has exercised dominion the British and to many Northern Irelanders (mostly Prot-over parts of the island, and at times the whole, for centu-

estants), and Derry in the south and to Catholic Northern

ries. The division of Ireland into two parts came after Irish

Irelanders. The politically correct call it L’Derry or Derry/

independence in 1921 and has been a matter of contention

Londonderry, which has earned it the nickname Stroke City,

ever since—most tragically during the thirty-year period,

the backward slash being the “stroke.” For reasons of clarity,

beginning in the late 1960s, known as “the Troubles.”

I’ve used Derry in these pages, at least partly because that’s

During this time, internecine political and sectarian violence

a direct Anglicization of its old Irish name, Daire, meaning

claimed the lives of more than three thousand people,

“oak grove.” Again, I mean no disrespect to those who prefer

mostly in Northern Ireland. The so-called Belfast or Good

to give it its more recent (seventeenth-century) name.

Friday Agreement, signed in 1998, began a healing process

3INTRODUCTION#

It is often said that the Irish do not have good food. This is not true. They just say

that their food is not good so you won’t get any of it!

—Colin Bladey, Irish food blogger

Nua gacha bid agus sean gacha dighe. (“Every food fresh, every drink mature.”)

—Old Irish saying

There is a sense in which all Irish cooking—at least the good

brown boot polish.” No sane person ever questioned the

stuff, the real thing—is country cooking. It is almost inevi-

quality of Irish stout or whiskey, but what did people actually

tably straightforward, homey fare, based on first-rate raw

eat over there? Irish stew and soda bread, fine, and then what?

materials whose identity shines through. Even in sophisticated

An Irish seven-course dinner, went the old joke, was a potato

urban restaurants, it tends to have an underlying earthiness

and a six-pack of Guinness. Milton Berle once quipped that

and solidity that suggest honesty and respect for rural tradi-

Irish Gourmet Cooking was one of the four shortest books in

tion. This is not surprising, since no other nation in Western

the world.

Europe—not even Italy or Spain—remains as intimately and

The truth is that the Irish used to eat very well indeed.

pervasively connected to the land as Ireland does. Almost any

Even back in the hunter-gatherer days, ten thousand years ago

Irishman or Irishwoman you meet, including those Armani-

or so, inhabitants of the island enjoyed a varied diet, includ-

suited business tycoons and Diesel-clad club kids you’ll meet

ing salmon, eel, and trout (all of which they smoked), wild

in Dublin or Belfast, will admit to some personal association

boar, hare, thrush, pigeon, wild apples, wild pears, hazelnuts,

with a farm: grew up on one, spent childhood summers on

and possibly water lily seeds. Following the domestication

one, has a brother or an aunt or a good friend who owns one.

of cattle, sheep, and goats and the first cultivation of cereal

At the very least, Grandma kept a cow for milk or Grandpa had

crops some millennia later, a variety of farm-raised meats and

a small potato patch or both. (The president of Ireland herself,

porridge and basic flatbreads were added to the diet. The Irish

Mary McAleese, has long maintained a vegetable garden and

also developed an almost obsessive passion for what they called

a chicken coop on the grounds of the Áras an Uachtaráin, the

bánbhianna, or “white meats”—the collective name given to

Irish White House.) Whether the average citizen realizes it

an immense range of milk products, including fresh milk, sour

or not, this close connection to the soil is one of the island’s

milk, buttermilk, butter (enjoyed both fresh and preserved),

greatest cultural strengths, and it helps give great promise to

clabber, cheese curds, and numerous varieties of cheese.

the future of Irish cuisine.

Successive waves of invaders added to the larder:

At the same time, perhaps no other nation in Europe

The Vikings, who first raided Ireland in a.d. 795 and went

has heard its food so consistently maligned—often for good

on to found Waterford, Wexford, Limerick, Cork, and

reason. More than one reader must have nodded in agree-

Dublin, had a well-developed trade with the Mediterranean,

ment when the Dublin physician F. R. Cruise observed, back

and brought in olive oil and wine. In the twelfth century, the

in 1896, that “while God supplies the provisions, very often

Anglo-Normans improved agricultural methods and intro-

another, and unmentionable being, sends the cook!” Three

duced pulses and other vegetables previously unknown to

generations later, in the 1960s, while attending a horse fair

the island, as well as spices and a taste for sweet-and-sour

in Buttevant, County Cork, the County Tipperary writer

flavors. The English, who first settled in Ireland in significant

and horse breeder Marjorie Quarton was subjected to a meal

numbers in the sixteenth century, gave the country still more

at a local hotel that was probably all too typical at the time:

new foods, everything from turkeys to (possibly) potatoes.

“[W]ashing-up-water soup . . . boiled whatever-it-is . . . raw

The latter changed Irish life forever, in ways both positive and

potatoes . . . liquid grey cabbage and melting, onion-flavoured

negative, and so did the English themselves. The history of the

ice cream. . . . Even the tea was undrinkable, resembling liquid

English in Ireland is a violent, complicated tale, controversial

in interpretation even to this day, and this is not the place

Gerald of Wales, called it “the most temperate of all countries”),

to attempt to retell it. Suffice it to say, in the words of the

and it boasts vast expanses of mineral-rich farmland conducive

County Tipperary archeologist and food historian Caiman

to growing things, above all grass and the animals that feed on

O’Brien, that “Ireland’s indigenous food culture disappeared

it. Ireland also has more than 3,500 miles/5,600 kilometers

when the Irish lords lost their land.”

of coastline, washed by unpolluted waters and teeming with

Today, a new indigenous Irish food culture is being born.

fish and shellfish of the highest quality. (I’ve never before been

in a country where so much freshly, locally landed seafood is

There are countless Irish saints, kings, and mythological

available, in small towns as well as big cities—even though the

figures called Colman, and I can trace a branch of my father’s

Irish still take comparatively little advantage of it.) The island

family back to counties Tyrone and Donegal in the eigh-

also has a living tradition of small farms, an increasing number

teenth and early nineteenth centuries (the names involved

of them organic or nearly so. (As the Irish-American author

were mostly Scots-Irish or English ones like Hardy, Stewart,

J. P. Donleavy once put it, the Irishman “has held up his hand

Craig, Creswell, Patton, Porter, and Whitehill). But my

to object to the poisonous residues which grant nations their

mother named me after Ronald Colman—she’d been an inge-

badge of honor as they progress.”) There is relatively little

nue in a movie with him—and I visited Ireland for the first

soulless agribusiness in Ireland, and there’s an active campaign

time only in 2002. I was invited that year by the Bord Bía, or

against genetically modified crops and livestock. The scale of

Irish Food Board, to speak at a specialty food symposium in

production in much of the country makes sustainability and

Kinsale, County Cork, the putative food capital of the coun-

traceability endemic; “farm-to-table” isn’t just a catch-phrase—

try (see page 61). I didn’t exactly have a culinary epiphany at

it’s a description of real distribution practices, at least in more

the event, but I did get my first taste of some excellent arti-

enlightened quarters. Ireland is green in more ways than one.

sanal Irish cheeses. More important, it was there that I met

It’s also red-hot. All over Ireland, from the artisanal

County Tipperary grocer Peter Ward (see page 301), who was

ateliers of West Cork to the lush market gardens of

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