The Artful Baker: Extraordinary Desserts From an Obsessive Home by Cenk Sonmezsoy, EPUB, 1419726498

October 21, 2017

The Artful Baker: Extraordinary Desserts From an Obsessive Home Baker by Cenk Sonmezsoy

  • Print Length: 384 Pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams
  • Publication Date: October 17, 2017
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1419726498
  • ISBN-13: 978-1419726491
  • File Format: EPUB

 

”Preview”

CONTENTS

From San Francisco to İstanbul, from Blog to Book
Before We Begin

Cookies
Brownies
Cakes, Muffins, Cheesecakes & Meringues
Tarts, Galettes, Pie, Quiche, Cobbler & Crumble
Breads & Pastries
Ice Creams, Frozen Yogurt & Sorbets
Confections & Drinks
Jams & Jellies
Base Recipes

Ingredients
Measurements & Conversions
Equipment
Sources
Acknowledgments
Index
About the Author


CENK’S HOUSE COOKIES


One day in my early years of blogging, the food processor’s pulse button got stuck while I was making a tart dough. I was supposed to pulse until the butter pieces were the size of fat peas, but instead the dough gathered around the blade. There was no question that I was going to start the dough from scratch, but I couldn’t bear the thought of wasting the “ruined” dough. So I rolled it out, cut it into rounds, and jammed it into the freezer, ready to salvage it as cookies on a rainy day. I forgot all about it until one day when I was clearing out the freezer to make space for the ice cream I was churning.
The following day, I popped a tray of those cookies into the oven, still warm from a cake I’d baked for the blog. As I cleaned the kitchen, a familiar scent wafted from the oven—the aroma of the cookies I ate as a child while playing with my toy animals at the foot of my grandma’s chair, where she knitted for hours on end. They were Danish butter cookies from a royal-blue tin, separated with ruffled papers into five sections, each holding a different shape. I would take a long whiff before choosing which one to eat. Would it be the swirly one that instantly melts in your mouth? Or the extra-sweet one shaped like a small pretzel, topped with sugar crystals?
I experienced that same childhood excitement while those tart-dough cookies baked, and when I took a bite of a warm cookie it tasted the same, too: buttery and sweet, with a hint of coconut. What an amazing feeling it had been, knowing that those cookies would always be there waiting when I visited my grandmother. I reached for my notebook and wrote this: Everyone should have a house cookie. A dozen in a jar for last-minute guests, and stacks in the freezer, ready to be baked for those clever enough to call ahead. A cookie that will intoxicate guests with its aroma the moment you open the door. A cookie they will come to identify with you for life.
Months later, as I was going through the stack of recipe notes on my desk, I read that note and decided to stow the recipe away for a future book.
That day has come. I commence this book with the revamped version of my house cookies, served on the most beautiful plate I own, sitting gracefully on the most beautiful tablecloth I have ever set my eyes on—the cloth my spiritual grandmother, Esin Giz (see this page), embroidered seventy-nine years ago as a ten-year-old girl.


Makes 24 cookies

2 cups (280 grams) all-purpose flour
¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons (140 grams) confectioners’ sugar
¾ cup (75 grams) blanched almond flour
¼ cup (20 grams) unsweetened shredded dried coconut
¼ teaspoon (2 grams) fine sea salt
14 tablespoons (7 ounces; 200 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1 large egg, separated
⅔ cup (67 grams) sliced blanched almonds

In the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade, process the flour, sugar, almond flour, coconut, and salt until the coconut pieces are as fine as the almond flour, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the butter and pulse until coarse crumbs form. Add the egg yolk and process until the dough gathers around the blade, about 3 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.
Scrape the dough onto a large sheet of parchment paper. Cover with another sheet of parchment and roll out the dough into a round about 10 inches (25.5 cm) in diameter and ⅜ inch (1 cm) thick, occasionally flipping the dough with the parchment, then lifting and smoothing the parchment to avoid creases.
Transfer the dough and parchment to a baking sheet and chill until firm, at least 2 hours in the refrigerator or about 25 minutes in the freezer.
Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the chilled dough on a flat surface and peel off the top sheet of parchment. Using a 2-inch (5-cm) plain round cookie cutter, cut out as many cookies as you can and transfer them to the prepared baking sheet. Gather the scraps into a ball, roll the dough out again between the parchment sheets, and continue to cut out cookies until you run out of dough.
Spread out the almonds on one of the parchment sheets in a single layer. In a small bowl, whisk the egg white with a fork until frothy. Using a pastry brush, brush a layer of egg white over the cookies. Invert the cookies onto the almonds one by one, gently pressing them into the nuts to coat the cookie tops. Turn the cookies almond side up and place them back on the baking sheet, then freeze them, uncovered, until firm, 10 to 15 minutes. (Once they are firm, you can wrap them airtight and refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 2 months. No need to thaw, though you may need to add a couple of minutes to the baking time.)
Meanwhile, set a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
Arrange as many cookies as you can fit on the prepared baking sheet, leaving about 1 ¼ inches (3 cm) all around them. Keep the rest of the unbaked cookies in the refrigerator.
Bake until the edges of the cookies are golden and the almonds are golden brown, 22 to 24 minutes. Set the sheet on a wire rack to cool for 10 minutes, then transfer the cookies directly onto the rack to cool completely. Repeat with the remaining cookies.
Storage: The cookies will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days.


CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES


When I get my hands on a new baking book, I immediately turn to the chocolate chip cookie recipe. It is the ideal recipe to discover whether the author’s tastes match mine. If I see chocolate chips among the ingredients, I keep flipping the pages in hopes of finding a different recipe through which I can connect with the author, but deep down I know there is very little chance for us to become close friends. I’ve never understood the point of using chocolate manufactured specifically not to melt; if it doesn’t melt in the heat of the oven, how is it going to melt in my mouth?
If instead I see good-quality chocolate with an instruction to chop it into small pieces, the clouds open up, the angels start to sing, and we embark on a new road lined with melted chocolate and, hopefully, crispy edges and chewy centers, too.
To cement our newly formed friendship, I rush to the kitchen and give the recipe a try. Will it be cakey or crispy? If it turns out crispy on the edges and chewy in the center, we’re friends for life.
Over the years, I’ve made many friends this way, eventually creating my ideal version based on what I’ve learned from them. I thought I had perfected the recipe until I read David Leite’s article on chocolate chip cookies in the New York Times, where he revealed Maury Rubin’s secret for City Bakery’s chocolate chip cookies. Rubin’s tip—refrigerating the dough for thirty-six hours to develop a stronger toffee flavor—was so inspirational, I spent the next day and a half in the kitchen baking small batches of cookies at two-hour intervals to monitor the flavor development. As BakeWise author Shirley O. Corriher explains in the article, the extended resting period allows the flour particles, safeguarded with butter, to fully soak up the wet ingredients. The resulting cookie has not only a stronger toffee flavor, but also a chewier center.
I consider melted chocolate such an integral part of the cookie that, in addition to the chopped chocolate in the dough, I top each dough mound with a chocolate fève (see this page) before baking. The fève—an oval disk of couverture chocolate, slightly larger than a quarter and about ¼ inch (6 mm) thick—melts and spreads together with the dough, creating an enticing chocolate veil. To achieve this effect, the chocolate must be very high in cocoa butter; Valrhona Guanaja, which is 42.2 percent cocoa butter, is perfect for the job.
Now: cookies topped with a shiny chocolate veil, or lifeless chips stuck here and there? Are we friends or strangers?

Makes 26 cookies

2 ¼ cups (315 grams) all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon (4 grams) baking powder
¾ teaspoon (5 grams) baking soda
½ teaspoon (4 grams) fine sea salt
14 tablespoons (7 ounces; 200 grams) unsalted butter, softened
¾ cup plus 1 tablespoon (163 grams) packed light brown sugar
¾ cup (150 grams) granulated sugar
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
1 teaspoon (5 grams) pure vanilla extract
7 ounces (200 grams) bittersweet chocolate (70% cacao), chopped into small pieces
26 (2.7 ounces; 75 grams) bittersweet chocolate (70% cacao) fèves with about 42% cocoa butter (see headnote)

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter at medium-high speed until creamy, about 2 minutes. Add the brown and granulated sugars and beat until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the egg, egg yolk, and vanilla and beat until well blended, about 2 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed. Add half of the flour mixture and beat at the lowest speed just until incorporated. Add the remaining flour mixture together with the chopped chocolate and beat just until the flour is incorporated and the chocolate pieces are evenly distributed. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap, pressing it directly onto the surface of the dough. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or preferably 36 hours for a stronger toffee flavor.
To bake, set a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
Let the bowl stand at room temperature until the dough is soft enough to be scooped, about 20 minutes. Using an ice cream scoop with a 2-tablespoon (30-ml) capacity and a release mechanism, drop as many scoops of the dough (1.4 ounces; 40 grams each) as you can fit onto the prepared baking sheet, leaving about 2 inches (5 cm) all around them. (At this point, you can shape all the cookies, arrange them close together on the baking sheet, wrap them airtight, and refrigerate for up to 3 days. Alternatively, you can freeze them until firm, place them in a resealable plastic freezer bag, and freeze for up to 2 months. No need to thaw, though you may need to add a couple of minutes to the baking time.) Press one chocolate fève—whole or broken into a few pieces—close to the center of each cookie, flattening the dough slightly.
Bake until the edges of the cookies are golden brown, 14 to 16 minutes. Set the sheet on a wire rack to cool until the cookies are firm enough to handle, 2 to 3 minutes, then transfer the cookies directly onto the rack to cool just until warm. Repeat with the remaining cookies.
Storage: The cookies are best eaten warm, with the chocolate lace layer on top still shiny, but they will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days. Before serving, briefly wave a hair dryer set to low over the cookies to make the chocolate layer glisten.


Vanilla


Vanilla is one of the world’s most labor-intensive agricultural products. After the flowers of the vanilla orchid bloom in the spring, each must be pollinated to produce fruit, which happens naturally only by a certain genus of bee native to Mexico. In other parts of the world, including Madagascar—the world’s principal supplier of vanilla—each flower must be hand pollinated within a short window after opening. Natural pollination has a very low success rate, so nearly all the vanilla grown today is artificially pollinated.
After pollination come numerous other labor-intensive stages of production. As each fruit ripens at a different time, the beans are harvested daily. Once harvested, the pods are exposed to high temperatures to stop their growth. They are cured at a specific temperature and humidity, dried in the shade with occasional exposure to sunlight, then stored in closed boxes to develop their characteristic aroma. The next step is grading the pods according to specific criteria. Factors that determine quality include length, appearance, moisture content, and whether or not the pod has split on the end during the curing process. Pods shorter than 6 inches (15 cm)—or that are matte, blemished, low in moisture, or split—are assigned lower grades. Because the flavor intensity isn’t factored into these criteria, a higher grade doesn’t necessarily mean a higher concentration of flavor. For this reason, when buying vanilla beans, don’t judge them on their looks alone. The best judge is your nose.
The most common varieties of vanilla are Bourbon, Tahitian, and Mexican. Bourbon vanilla from Madagascar contains the highest ratio of vanillin—the main phenolic compound that contributes to vanilla flavor—making it the ideal variety for baking and making vanilla extract. Tahitian and Mexican varieties contain much less vanillin, and each has its own distinctive aroma. I prefer the floral Tahitian vanilla with tropical fruits, and I keep a small stock of the woody Mexican vanilla for milk-based desserts, which are usually mild enough to let the nuances in flavor shine through.
Making vanilla extract is a great way to preserve and extend the fruit. Using a whole bean would be overkill in most recipes, and as the bean quickly dries and loses its potency after cutting, it doesn’t make sense to save a partial bean for future use. Considering that we can make about sixteen teaspoons of vanilla extract from a single bean, and that we use 1 to 2 teaspoons of extract in most recipes, we can extend a single or partial bean’s life to many recipes. When you buy vanilla beans, wrap them tightly with plastic wrap, place them inside an airtight container, and store them in a cool, dark place.


HOW TO SPLIT AND SCRAPE THE SEEDS FROM A VANILLA BEAN


Place the vanilla bean on a cutting board with the curled tip facing away from you. If the pod has curled, hold down the curled tip and run the blunt side of a paring knife along the pod to straighten it.
Holding the knife parallel to the board, insert the blade right below the curled tip. Holding down both ends of the pod with the index finger and thumb of one hand, run the knife down the entire length to split the bean in half.
Working with one half at a time, hold down the tip of the pod and scrape the seeds by running the blunt side of the knife along the open pod. Use the seeds right away, as instructed in recipes.
Use the leftover pod halves to feed Homemade Vanilla Extract (this page) or to make Vanilla Sugar (this page).


VANILLA BEAN MELTAWAYS


This is my version of the beloved Turkish cookie, un kurabiyesi (literally, “flour cookie”). A dough that barely comes together is the key to its tender texture. The classic version is made by rolling the dough into a log, embossing the top with the tines of a fork, then cutting it into diamond shapes before baking. I prefer to cut fairly thick rounds so that they don’t dry out before turning a nice golden color at the edges.
A close friend of mine who was visiting the day I tested this recipe ate half a dozen of them, then asked me to pack a few for a friend he was meeting later. A couple of hours later, my phone rang. His friend was ecstatic: “That smell, that crumb! Two teas later and I can still taste them.” It’s the vanilla bean.

Makes 30 cookies

17 tablespoons (8.5 ounces; 240 grams) unsalted butter, softened
⅔ cup plus 2 tablespoons (127 grams) confectioners’ sugar
1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped (see this page)
2 ½ cups (350 grams) all-purpose flour
¼ cup (30 grams) cornstarch
¼ teaspoon (2 grams) fine sea salt

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter, ⅔ cup (107 grams) of the sugar, and the vanilla seeds at the lowest speed just until the sugar is incorporated. Raise the speed to medium-high and beat until creamy, about 3 minutes. Add the flour, cornstarch, and salt. Beat at the lowest speed until coarse crumbs form. Remove the bowl from the mixer and press the dough into a ball with your hands. You may use the leftover vanilla pod halves in Homemade Vanilla Extract (this page) or Vanilla Sugar (this page).
Roll out the dough between two large sheets of parchment paper into a round about 9 inches (23 cm) in diameter and ⅝ inch (1.6 cm) thick, occasionally flipping the dough with the parchment, then lifting and smoothing the parchment to avoid creases.
Transfer the dough and parchment to a baking sheet and chill until firm, at least 2 hours in the refrigerator or about 25 minutes in the freezer.
Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the chilled dough on a flat surface and peel off the top parchment. Using a 1 ½-inch (4-cm) fluted round cookie cutter, cut out as many cookies as you can and transfer them to the prepared baking sheet. Gather the scraps into a ball, roll the dough out again between the parchment sheets, and continue to cut out cookies until you run out of dough. Freeze the cookies, uncovered, until firm, 10 to 15 minutes. (Once they are firm, you can wrap them airtight and refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 2 months. No need to thaw, though you may need to add a couple of minutes to the baking time.)
Meanwhile, set a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat the oven to 325°F (160°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
Arrange as many cookies as you can fit on the prepared baking sheet, leaving about 1¼ inches (3 cm) all around them. Keep the rest of the unbaked cookies in the refrigerator.
Bake until the edges of the cookies are golden, 33 to 35 minutes. Set the sheet on a wire rack to cool for 10 minutes, then transfer the cookies directly onto the rack to cool completely. Repeat with the remaining cookies.
Put the remaining 2 tablespoons (20 grams) of sugar in a fine-mesh shaker and dust the tops and sides of the cookies.
Storage: The cookies will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days.


A collection of more than 100 extraordinary desserts—all with photos and meticulous instructions—by Cenk Sönmezsoy, creator of the internationally acclaimed blog Cafe Fernando.

Written, styled, photographed, and designed by Cenk Sönmezsoy, The Artful Baker shares the inspiring story of a passionate home baker, beginning with his years after graduate school in San Francisco and showcasing the fruits of a baking obsession he cultivated after returning home to İstanbul. Sönmezsoy’s stories and uniquely styled images, together with his original creations and fresh take on traditional recipes, offer a thoughtful and emotional window into the life of this luminary artist.

The Artful Baker is comprised of almost entirely new content, with a few updated versions of readers’ favorites from his blog, such as Brownie Wears Lace, his signature brownies topped with blond chocolate ganache and bittersweet chocolate lace (originally commissioned by Dolce & Gabbana and awarded “Best Original Baking and Desserts Recipe” by Saveur magazine); Raspberry Jewel Pluot Galette, a recipe inspired by Chez Panisse’s 40th year anniversary celebrations; and Devil Wears Chocolate, his magnificent devil’s food cake that graces the cover of the book.

Each chapter highlights a variety of indulgences, from cookies to cakes and tarts to ice creams, including recipes like Pistachio and Matcha Sablés; Tahini and Leblebi (double-roasted chickpeas) Swirl Brownies; Sakura Madeleines; Sourdough Simit, the beloved ring-shaped Turkish bread beaded with sesame seeds; Isabella Grape and Kefir Ice Cream; Pomegranate Jam; and Blanche, a berry tart named after the Golden Girl Blanche Devereaux.

Every recipe in The Artful Baker has gone through a meticulous development phase, tested by an army of home bakers having varying levels of skill, equipment, and access to ingredients, and revised to ensure that they will work flawlessly in any kitchen. Measurements of ingredients are provided in both volume and weight (grams). Where a volume measurement isn’t useful, weight measurements are provided in both ounces and grams.

>>> Download <<<
 

Related posts

One Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

1
Leave a Reply

avatar
1 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
1 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
1 Comment authors
H.R. Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
H.R.
Guest
H.R.

link isnt working ,
thanks