The Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook: 200 Fast and Foolproof Recipes for Every Brand of Electric Pressure Cooker by Barbara Schieving, EPUB, 1558328963

December 14, 2017

 The Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook: 200 Fast and Foolproof Recipes for Every Brand of Electric Pressure Cooker by Barbara Schieving, EPUB, 1558328963

The Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook: 200 Fast and Foolproof Recipes for Every Brand of Electric Pressure Cooker by Barbara Schieving

  • Print Length: 304 Pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Common Press
  • Publication Date: November 14, 2017
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B077417QCV
  • ISBN-10: 1558328963
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558328969
  • File Format: EPUB

 

”Preview”

Contents

Preface: Under Pressure

Introduction: Getting the Most from Your Electric Pressure Cooker

Chapter 1: Breakfasts

Chapter 2: Sandwiches, Wraps, Tacos, and More

Chapter 3: Soup’s On

Chapter 4: Shortcut Dinners

Chapter 5: 30-Minute Meals

Chapter 6: Sunday Suppers

Chapter 7: On the Side

Chapter 8: Desserts

Acknowledgments

About the Author

Index

Preface: Under Pressure

Like many of you, I’m a busy mom and under pressure to get delicious, healthy meals on the table fast. Now, thanks to my electric pressure cooker, mealtime has never been quicker or easier.

Growing up, my mom used an old-fashioned stovetop pressure cooker to cook a pot roast on Sundays. The regulator on top wiggled and jiggled and made scary noises. It always made me a little nervous—although I was too little to remember, my older siblings loved to tell the story of when my stepmother’s old stovetop pressure cooker exploded, blasting food everywhere—even the ceiling! Still, despite that mishap, I grew up knowing meals made in a pressure cooker were fast and delicious.

Pressure cookers fell out of favor at my house when my mom got her first microwave. While there’s no denying a microwave’s convenience, it’s simply not possible to get the rich flavor of a long-simmered meal from a microwave.

Many years later, after becoming a mom myself, I began hearing about electric pressure cookers. I was impressed when I read how much pressure cooker technology had improved and saw all the safety features on the new pressure cookers. I was also intrigued by how easy electric pressure cookers were to use—set-it-and-forget-it easy. I also remembered the home-cooked dinners of my childhood and knew I had to try one.

I really did fall in love with my electric pressure cooker after making my first recipe. I appreciated how quick and easy it was to make meals in the pressure cooker, and I loved having only one pot to wash. And the food tasted great—tender, fall-apart meats; soups that tasted as though they’d simmered for hours; and pasta and rice dishes cooked to perfection.

All 200 recipes in this cookbook are recipes I enjoy with my family. I’ve included 50 of the most popular recipes from my website, Pressure Cooking Today (www.pressurecookingtoday.com), and created 150 all-new electric pressure cooker recipes that I’m sure will become new favorites. The recipes in this cookbook are a good mix of old-fashioned American favorites, international cuisines with an American flair, and healthy meals with trendy ingredients. Of course, I had to include some decadently delicious pressure cooker desserts as well. I’m so excited to share these new recipes with you!

Thanks for joining me on my journey to make quicker and better-tasting meals using today’s modern, easy-to-use electric pressure cookers.

Barbara Schieving

Introduction: Getting the Most from Your Electric Pressure Cooker

There is a pressure cooking renaissance going on right now. You can make better tasting meals in a fraction of the time using today’s modern, easy-to-use electric pressure cookers. As with any new tool, there are a few things you’ll need to know before you get cooking—let’s get started.

ADVANTAGES OF USING AN ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER

Pressure cooking, in general, offers certain advantages over the oven, stove, or slow cooker.

• FASTER COOK TIME. Electric pressure cookers let you cook meats, stews, soups, beans, stocks, and broths in a fraction of the time they take to cook on the stove, in the oven, or with the slow cooker—and foods still taste like they’ve been cooking for hours!

• BETTER FLAVOR. The pressure inside the pot raises the boiling point, which forces liquid into tough foods, making them tender, and the high heat promotes caramelization, adding depth of flavor.

• BETTER NUTRIENT RETENTION. The longer you cook fruits and vegetables in water, the more nutrients they lose. When you pressure cook your vegetables, you use a shorter cook time—keeping nutrients in your food and making your meals healthier.

• COOK FROM FROZEN. Forget to thaw the meat? No problem! No thawing required before pressure cooking. (This works best for smaller cuts of meat.)

• COST SAVINGS. Ovens and stoves use a lot of energy as they cook. Pressure cookers require less energy, have shorter cook times, and don’t heat up your house.

• EASY CLEANUP. One-pot cooking means only one pot to clean.

In addition, there are some unique advantages to electric pressure cookers instead of stovetop pressure cookers:

• SAFETY. Electric pressure cookers have several built-in safety features to prevent mishaps, including automatic pressure control, heating and pressure sensors, lid detection, and heating plates that distribute heat evenly.

• CONVENIENCE. You don’t have to stand at the stove to adjust the heat so that whatever you’re cooking doesn’t boil over—the electric pressure cooker automatically regulates the heat and pressure. Go play with your kids, pay bills, or clean the kitchen and set the table while the electric pressure cooker does all the work.

• CONSISTENT RESULTS. Once you figure out the right cook time for your pressure cooker you’ll come back to a perfectly cooked dish—every time.

• KEEP WARM SETTING. Unlike a stovetop pressure cooker, you don’t need to worry about being home to turn off the pot; most electric pressure cookers automatically switch to the Keep Warm setting when the pressure cook time ends.

GETTING TO KNOW YOUR ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER

The earliest pressure cookers were created on a simple concept: Food cooks hotter and faster inside a pressure-sealed pot. (The scientific explanation involves raising the boiling point of water, which allows pressure cookers to cook food about 40°F (4.5°C) hotter than it could cook on the stovetop.) Electric pressure cookers use technology to enhance this process—for instance, by using sensors to regulate the temperature and pressure automatically inside the pot during cooking.

Electric pressure cookers place the cooking pot inside a housing unit that includes a heating element and sensors as well as the operating controls. The lid contains a gasket to ensure it fits snugly against the housing and a pressure release valve and small float valve that allow pressure to release safely, if needed.

There are many brands of electric pressure cookers currently on the market. (Some brands prefer the term “multi-cookers” because they offer slow cooking features; however, they all operate similarly, and, for simplicity, I refer to them all as pressure cookers throughout the book.) I own several brands and often use two at the same time. Some brands in my kitchen include:

INSTANT POT. The Instant Pot pressure cooker is the one I use most in my kitchen. I really like the stainless steel pot for browning and that the cooker tells me when it’s preheated and ready to sauté ingredients. It’s quiet, comes in a variety of models, and sizes range from 3 quart to 8 quart (2.8 to 7.5 L). The Instant Pot is a multi-cooker, and some models offer high- and low-pressure settings and also function as slow cookers, rice cookers, and yogurt makers. The Instant Pot has limited availability in stores but is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

FAGOR. Fagor has been selling stovetop pressure cookers worldwide for decades, and they’ve recently entered the electric pressure cooker market with two quality products: the LUX multi-cooker and the more affordable Premium Pressure Cooker. The LUX was recently chosen as the top-rated multi-cooker in Good Housekeeping’s “Multi-Settings Cooker Reviews.” I really like the buttons on the Fagor pressure cookers. Fagor pressure cookers come with a nonstick pot, though they recently began offering the LUX LCD with a stainless steel pot. You’ll find Fagor pressure cookers at specialty kitchen stores as well as online.

POWER PRESSURE COOKER. The Power Pressure Cooker is one of the best-selling electric pressure cookers on the market. It comes in three sizes—6 quart, 8 quart, and 10 quart (5.7, 7.5, and 9.5 L)—and it’s an affordable option for a larger pressure cooker. Currently it offers only a nonstick pot, which makes for easy cleanup but doesn’t brown quite as well as a stainless steel pot. A favorite on QVC, the Power Pressure Cooker XL is now available in many retail stores, including Costco and Sam’s Club.

CUISINART. My first electric pressure cooker was a 6-quart (5.7 L) Cuisinart, so I have a fondness for it. It doesn’t tout itself as a multi-cooker, and I like the straightforward buttons. Select High or Low Pressure, set the cook time, and press start—no wondering whether to use the chicken button or the stew button. It comes with a nonstick pot that can get scratched if you’re not careful. The Cuisinart is available at specialty kitchen stores as well as online.

As the popularity of electric pressure cookers has exploded, many manufacturers have added electric pressure cookers or multi-cookers to their offerings. Breville, Farberware, Black & Decker, and T-fal now offer 6-quart (5.7 L) electric pressure cookers, which operate similarly to the models I’ve discussed.

Electric Pressure Cooker Parts

The various electric pressure cooker brands use slightly different terms to refer to the cooker’s parts; however, these parts are similar among all brands. For your convenience, I’ve included a quick explanation of the terms I use throughout the book.

COOKING POT. Made of stainless steel, ceramic, or nonstick aluminum, this removable pot is where the magic happens. (Do not confuse this with the housing, also called the exterior or stationary pot—you can seriously damage your electric pressure cooker if you try to cook without the cooking pot inside the housing.)

PRESSURE RELEASE VALVE. Also called a pressure limit valve, pressure regulator knob, steam release handle, steam release reset button, and rapid release button, this plastic piece is located on the lid’s exterior and controls whether the pressure inside the pot is allowed to escape. While the different brands have different names for this knob, it’s the same basic principal: Use it to either seal the pressure cooker or to allow the steam to escape and let the pressure release quickly.

SEALING RING. Made of tough, food-grade silicone, this removable ring attaches to the underside of the lid. When locked in place, this ring creates the airtight seal that lets the pressure cooker come to pressure. This is also called a silicone gasket, rubber grommet, or rubber gasket, depending on the brand.

FLOAT VALVE. Also called a floating valve or pressure limit valve, this small valve is one of the safety features of electric pressure cookers. As your pressure cooker comes to pressure, the float valve is pushed up until the mini gasket seals the cooker. When the float valve rises, the lid locks to prevent it from being opened while the contents are at pressure. When this valve drops, you can carefully remove the lid and continue with your recipe.

Selecting a Button

As with the pressure cooker components, even though different pressure cooker brands use different names for the buttons, all pressure cookers operate similarly. The recipes in this cookbook are designed to work in any electric pressure cooker—regardless of what the control panel looks like or how many buttons it has.

If you have a multi-cooker with additional buttons, your user manual should have an in-depth explanation of the different buttons and how they work. I recommend familiarizing yourself with them. However, these manuals don’t always clarify that the buttons are simply convenience settings with preprogrammed cook times. Pressure cookers currently on the market cannot sense what you are actually cooking in the pot.

So, don’t worry—you’re not going to “mess up” by using the Meat button when you cook chicken soup. Nearly all the buttons on electric pressure cookers cook at High Pressure, so it really doesn’t matter if you choose the Meat, Stew, or Poultry button. You can even cook desserts using the Meat button with no problem, as long as you adjust the cook time accordingly.

Initial Walk-Through

An easy way to familiarize yourself with your electric pressure cooker is to test it using only water. The steps in this process are repeated every time you cook at pressure, though they won’t always be written in this much detail in the recipe.

1. Place the pressure cooking pot inside the housing. Get in the habit of checking that the inner pot is there before you start pouring in ingredients!

2. Add 1 cup (235 ml) water to the pressure cooking pot.

3. Check that the lid is properly assembled with the sealing ring in position and the float valve in place. Close and lock the lid. Verify that your pressure cooker is positioned so that steam vents away from cabinets.

4. Make sure the pressure release valve is in the Sealed position. The term for this position varies by brand (Sealing for Instant Pot; Pressure for Fagor and Cuisinart). Read your user manual for the exact term on your electric pressure cooker.

5. Select the Manual/High Pressure setting and set 5 minutes for the cook time. (Or, to test a multi-cooker setting, select one of the preprogrammed pressure cooking buttons and set a 5-minute cook time.)

6. Watch while the pressure cooker does all the work. It takes about 5 minutes for the water to heat up and build pressure; some steam will release from the float valve while pressure is building. The steam causes the float valve to rise and seal, but the timer won’t start until the pot reaches pressure—only then does the timer start counting down.

7. When the cook time ends, carefully turn the pressure release valve to the Venting position so that steam can escape and the pressure can release. Again, the exact term varies by brand (Venting for Instant Pot, Steam for Fagor). Avoid placing your hands, face, or arms directly over the valve—the steam is very hot and can burn. (When my daughter first started using her electric pressure cooker, the steam and the noise made her a little nervous, so she used a wooden spoon to turn the valve.)

8. Once the steam disperses completely, you should hear the float valve drop. When this happens, the lid unlocks. Carefully remove the lid, tilting it so that steam vents away from you. The pressure cooking pot is hot—use hot pads or silicone mitts to remove it.

9. Don’t forget to turn off the pressure cooker! (Sometimes I unplug my pressure cooker to make sure it isn’t still cooking on the Keep Warm setting without my noticing.)

That’s it! Now that you’re familiar with your pressure cooker, let’s get started with some easy pressure cooking recipes, such as Cilantro-Lime Rice or Strawberry Applesauce. Before you know it, you’ll be making fabulous pressure cooker meals and wondering how you ever cooked without it!

PRESSURE COOKING TERMINOLOGY

When my daughter first began using a pressure cooker, she was a little intimidated by the unfamiliar terms she encountered in my recipes. Many cooks who are new to pressure cooking feel this way; however, once you learn the terminology, you’ll be confident and ready to get cooking.

Releasing Pressure

One of the first things to learn about pressure cooking is when and how to release the pressure. When the cook time ends, the cooker beeps. At this point, the recipe directs you how to release the pressure in the pressure cooking pot, using one of the following methods:

NATURAL PRESSURE RELEASE. A natural pressure release is when you leave the pressure release valve in the Sealed position when the cook time ends; this lets the pressure release slowly, without you doing anything. After the cook time expires, most electric pressure cookers automatically switch to the Keep Warm setting and the pressure inside the cooking pot begins to drop slowly. Food inside the cooking pot continues to cook as the pressure decreases. A natural pressure release can take from 5 to 30 minutes—the time varies depending on the ingredients and amount of liquid in the cooking pot.

The pressure cooker will not open until all pressure is released. When the pressure is fully released, the float valve drops and the lid unlocks and opens easily. There is no beep or signal when the pressure is released, though sometimes you can hear the float valve drop if you’re close by.

Use a natural pressure release any time you need to release the pressure gradually—particularly for soups and grains, which are known to foam inside the pressure cooking pot, and for large cuts of meat, which need to rest after cooking to tenderize the meat.

QUICK PRESSURE RELEASE. A quick pressure release (or rapid release) is when you turn the pressure release valve to the Venting position and let the steam release quickly after the cook time ends. (Remember, the exact term for the valve varies by brand.) Unlike a natural pressure release, a quick pressure release results in a strong jet of steam coming from the pressure release valve. This is normal. If drops of liquid or foam start to emerge from the pressure release valve, simply switch the valve back to the Sealed position and use an intermittent pressure release (see following).

When you use a quick pressure release, you know the pressure is fully released when the steam fully dissipates and the float valve drops. You cannot unlock the lid until all the pressure is released.

A quick pressure release stops the cooking quickly to avoid overcooking; it is well suited for ingredients such as potatoes and vegetables that need to stop cooking while they’re tender but still hold their shape.

INTERMITTENT PRESSURE RELEASE. An intermittent pressure release is the best way to release pressure for foods such as pastas, soups, and certain grains, which are prone to foaming or spitting if you try to release pressure with a quick release. With this method, you open and close the pressure release valve in intervals. This allows the pressure to escape more quickly than a natural pressure release and also prevents foam from coming out of the pressure release valve. With some foods, one or two closed intervals is all I need before I can leave the valve in the Venting position; with other foods, if the foaming is particularly bad, I will close the valve and wait a minute or two, then slide the valve to Venting again and continue opening and closing the valve as needed.

ABBREVIATED NATURAL RELEASE. The different types of pressure releases can also be combined; for example, in many recipes in this cookbook, I let the pressure release naturally for a number of minutes, then use a quick pressure release to release any remaining pressure. Combining the two release options reduces waiting time yet gives you many of the benefits of a natural pressure release, such as reducing foam and tenderizing meats.

KEEP WARM SETTING. When the pressure cook time ends, most models will automatically switch to the Keep Warm setting. This setting continues to heat food at a low temperature. Check your manual for details on how the Keep Warm setting works in your brand.

HELPFUL TIP: I prefer to turn off the pressure cooker after pressure cooking and set a kitchen timer to beep and remind me when to release the pressure. If you prefer to leave the pressure cooker on once the pressure cook time ends and let the Keep Warm setting keep track of the elapsed time, that’s a great option too. The pressure begins to release naturally either way, so choose what works best for you.

Sautéing, Simmering, and Browning

Sautéing ingredients before cooking results in richer, more complex flavors; it is a cornerstone of cooking meats and soups and is necessary for flavorful gravies and sauces.

One big advantage of using a pressure cooker is sautéing foods directly in the pressure cooking pot before pressure cooking. The buttons on pressure cookers vary from brand to brand, though, most include a button for sautéing ingredients, and many also have buttons for browning and simmering. Often, the trick is simply finding the right button! (For example, some models of the Instant Pot use Sauté adjusted to More for browning and Sauté adjusted to Less for simmering. Some electric pressure cookers simply use a pressure setting without the lid in place; for instance, the Power Pressure Cooker XL sautés using the Chicken setting without the lid.) Consult your pressure cooker’s user manual to identify the capabilities of your machine.

Since there is so much variety between machines, the recipes in this book use two terms for cooking techniques: Simmer/Sauté and Browning/Sauté. Use what works best according to your cooking preferences and your machine’s capabilities. As you would sauté on a stovetop, use these buttons only when the lid is off.

SIMMER/SAUTÉ. When you see this term in a recipe, select either the Simmer or Sauté button. The Simmer feature uses a lower heat than the Sauté feature and is best for thickening sauces and soups.

BROWNING/SAUTÉ. Likewise, when you see this term, use either the Browning or Sauté button to cook. The Browning feature uses a higher heat than the Sauté feature, so your meats and vegetables (such as onions, carrots, and celery) cook more quickly on Browning than on Sauté.

Here are some tips to get the best results from the Browning/Sauté settings:

• Select the Browning/Sauté button to preheat the pot. Do not add any oil or ingredients to the cooking pot before it has finished preheating.

• Electric pressure cooking pots are slightly raised in the middle, so the oil will run to the sides, which may make foods stick when placed in the middle of the pot. To prevent sticking, you can use a pastry brush to spread the oil around the pot, but I prefer to pick up the pressure cooker and swirl the oil around.

• Don’t crowd the pot by adding too much food at the same time. This is especially important with meats—if they are packed tightly in the pot, they will steam, not brown.

• When cooking vegetables, stir frequently to promote even cooking. In contrast, when cooking meats, place the meat in the pot and do not stir. Periodically test with a fork by gently lifting part of the meat; do not turn it until the meat releases easily from the pot.

• If foods cook too quickly (for example, a sauce boiling too rapidly), use a hot pad to lift the inner pot a few inches (about 7.5 cm) away from the heating element on the bottom of the pot or remove the pot from the pressure cooker briefly. If your machine has the capability, switch to a lower heat setting.

• After you finish browning, many recipes have you deglaze, or add liquids to, the hot pan. When you brown vegetables or meats, they release juices that caramelize on the bottom of the pot, called fond, which adds delicious flavor to sauces and gravies. Adding a liquid—such as broth, juice, wine, or even plain water (don’t use dairy, which could curdle)—loosens the fond from the bottom of the pot. Immediately after adding the liquid, stir, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pot to flavor the sauce. The fond should be golden-brown to dark brown; if it turns black, your food will taste burnt.

• When I’m cooking recipes that use a lot of liquids, I’ll often sauté the meat and vegetables, add the liquids to deglaze, and leave the Browning/Sauté setting on while I add the rest of the ingredients. This starts heating the liquids and cuts down on the time it takes to come to pressure.

PRESSURE COOKING EQUIPMENT

There are some pressure cooking accessories I use often enough that I consider them truly essential to pressure cooking. Luckily, they are also affordably priced, making it easier to add them to your kitchen arsenal. Other accessories simply make life easier or are needed for certain recipes only—they’re nice to have, but not absolutely necessary.

All items listed below are used in the recipes in this cookbook. You may already have some of these items. If you don’t, you may have dishes and pans in your kitchen that will make good substitutes—if a dish is ovenproof and fits easily in the cooking pot, it should be safe to use in the electric pressure cooker.

Essentials

TRIVET. A trivet or a rack with feet keeps ingredients or other bowls off the bottom of the pressure cooking pot. While many pressure cookers include a trivet, consider purchasing a second—a few of my recipes use an additional trivet for stacking items.

STEAMER BASKET. Like a trivet, a steamer basket keeps foods out of the water; however, the steamer basket is more substantial and has small holes like a colander. This gadget really helps those foods that break down easily in water retain their shape—I consider it essential for cooking potatoes—and it also makes vegetables easy to remove from the pressure cooking pot.

EXTRA SILICONE RING. I keep an extra silicone ring on hand in case the original gets damaged, but I consider it a must-have when cooking mild-flavored breakfasts or desserts to avoid a transfer of smell and flavor—the last thing you want is to have tonight’s cheesecake tasting slightly like yesterday’s barbecue.

SLING. A sling makes it much easier to remove pots from the pressure cooker. You can make your own sling by folding a long strip of aluminum foil in thirds lengthwise. However, if you’d like a longer-lasting sling, cut a large silicone pastry mat lengthwise into strips—mine are about 4 inches (10 cm) wide and 26 inches (66 cm) long. The silicone makes a great nonslip surface that helps the pan stay in place on the sling as you lower it into the cooking pot. Carefully tuck the ends of the sling away from the contents of the pan before you lock the lid in place.

INSTANT-READ THERMOMETER. I consider this essential for verifying that larger cuts of meat are cooked to a safe internal temperature. The thermometer also helps you check that cheesecakes and other desserts are set.

Specialty Items

SMALL CAKE PAN. I use my 7 × 3-inch (18 × 7.5 cm) round cake pan for cakes, lasagnas, pot-in-pot rice, and so much more. You can use almost any ovenproof, flat-bottomed pan or glass dish that fits in your pressure cooking pot.

IMMERSION BLENDER. While you can use any blender for these recipes, an immersion blender lets you blend creamy soups directly in the pressure cooking pot without having to worry about spilling hot liquid when you transfer it to a blender. (If you have a nonstick cooking pot, be careful not to scratch your pot with an immersion blender.)

SPRINGFORM PAN. A 6- or 7-inch (15 or 18 cm) springform pan is the perfect size for making cheesecake in a 6-quart (5.7 L) pressure cooker. It also works well for cooking cakes and quiches.

GLASS CUSTARD CUPS. These small 6-ounce (170 g) glass custard cups are perfect for cooking single-serve items such as mini desserts and egg muffins.

CANNING JAR LIFTER TONGS. I like to use these to remove glass custard cups or Mason jars from my pressure cooker. They’re also handy for removing fresh corn on the cob from the pressure cooking pot.

PRESSURE COOKING POINTERS

READ THE ENTIRE RECIPE BEFORE COOKING. Few things in the kitchen are more frustrating than getting halfway through a recipe and realizing you don’t have an ingredient or that the food needs to chill for hours before you can continue. Plus, having foods measured and chopped before you start cooking can help cut your stress level as you cook. In addition, many recipes have serving suggestions at the end, so reading to the end helps you plan ahead so that you have these items ready when you need them.

UNDERSTAND RECIPE TIMING. While pressure cooking is fast, it doesn’t happen in an instant. When you start the pressure cooker, the heating element turns on and starts to heat your food, building the steam that puts the “pressure” in pressure cooking. The time spent coming to pressure is similar to time spent preheating an oven or waiting for water to boil—it isn’t counted in the cook time. The recipe cook time does not start until the pressure cooker reaches pressure. The time it takes for your pressure cooker to reach pressure could be as quick as 5 minutes when cooking with small amounts of liquid or as long as 30 minutes if your ingredients are cold or your pot is filled with lots of liquid.

TRUST YOUR SENSES. You’ll be more successful and avoid mistakes in the kitchen if you learn to trust your instincts and your senses. Remove the cooking pot from the pressure cooker housing immediately if you smell burning while sautéing. Use a quick pressure release and open the lid if you see steam escaping from around the sides of the lid—you don’t have a proper seal. Don’t be afraid to take action if something doesn’t seem right!

RECOGNIZE THERE’S MORE THAN ONE RIGHT WAY TO PRESSURE COOK. One of the best features of pressure cooking is its flexibility; often, there are many ways to approach cooking certain items. For example, I prefer to cook beans using a quick soak method (1 minute at pressure with 1 hour soak time), but you can also soak your beans overnight or even increase the pressure cook time in the recipe to accommodate the unsoaked beans. While none of these methods is “right” or “wrong,” you will find you prefer some methods over others. Use what works best for you!

USE THESE RECIPES WITH A STOVETOP PRESSURE COOKER. All recipes in this cookbook can also be cooked in a stovetop pressure cooker. Simply bring your stovetop pressure cooker to pressure using a medium-high heat and then reduce the heat to the lowest setting necessary to maintain pressure. Start timing the cook time once your stovetop pressure cooker reaches pressure.

USE THE MINIMUM LIQUID REQUIRED. The minimum amount of liquid required varies among the different brands of pressure cookers; consult your user manual to find your brand’s minimum amount. However, many brands do not acknowledge that the minimum amount of liquid required can also depend on what you’re cooking. Many ingredients release liquid as they cook, so you can use less liquid to begin with; for example, many of my chicken recipes use less than the minimum amount of water because the chicken releases liquid as it cooks.

REDUCE OR DOUBLE RECIPES. When reducing a recipe, do not reduce the liquids below 1/2 to 1 cup (120 to 235 ml) cooking liquid. For example, when reducing my Cheesy Potatoes au Gratin (page XX), I halve all ingredients except the broth and spices added below the steamer basket. After steaming the potatoes, I simply discard half the remaining cooking liquid and continue with the recipe.

You can generally use the same cook time specified in the original recipe, as the timing is based more on the thickness of the food than on the amount. Therefore, when you reduce a recipe, don’t cut the cook time if the thickness of the food remains the same—especially when cooking meat. For example, whether you cook 2 pork chops or 6 pork chops, the cook time stays the same if all the pork chops are the same thickness.

When doubling a recipe, never fill the pot above the maximum fill line, typically two-thirds full or half full for foods that foam. (For this reason, I don’t recommend doubling most pasta recipes in this book.) However, the same principles for cook time apply to doubling a recipe—as long as the thickness of the food is the same, you can generally use the recipe’s original cook time. Be aware that a fuller pot takes longer to come to and release pressure, which increases the overall time, and you may need to reduce the recipe cook time to compensate.

HIGH-ALTITUDE COOKING. I live about 4,000 feet (1.2 km) above sea level, which is considered high altitude, and I occasionally need to change a recipe to adjust for that. Water boils at a lower temperature at high altitudes, so foods may need a slightly longer cook time. The technical rule is to add 5 percent more cook time at 3,000 feet (0.9 km) above sea level, 10 percent for 4,000 feet (1.2 km) above sea level, and so on, increasing by 5 percent every additional 1,000 feet (0.3 km). For example, at my altitude, if a recipe has a cook time of 30 minutes at sea level, technically I should add an extra 3 minutes to account for my altitude (0.10 × 30 minutes = 3 minutes extra).

That said, I rarely adjust for altitude, especially for foods with short cook times. Occasionally, I need to increase my cook times by a few minutes, especially with beans and grains. The recipes in this cookbook were tested at various altitudes and should not need any adjustment below 5,000 feet (1.5 km).

CHECK THE TEMPERATURE. As discussed in the Selecting a Button section (see here), your pressure cooker does not have a sensor that monitors what’s cooking in the pot; each button only starts a preprogrammed cook time. The only way to know that your foods have reached the desired internal temperature is to use an instant-read thermometer.

I highly recommend getting in the habit of checking the temperature of pressure cooked foods. Common safe internal temperatures are as follows:

Breads and cakes

210°F

(100°C)

Baked potatoes

205°F

(96°C)

Chicken thighs and wings

180°F

(82°C)

Beef (well-done)

165°F

(74°C)

Chicken breasts

165°F

(74°C)

Turkey breasts

165°F

(74°C)

Ground beef (e.g., meatloaf)

155°F

(68°C)

Cheesecake

150°F

(65.5°C)

Beef (medium)

145°F

(63°C)

Fish

145°F

(63°C)

Pork

145°F

(63°C)

Beef (rare)

125°F

(51.5°C)

THICKEN SAUCES AND GRAVIES AFTER PRESSURE COOKING. Since pressure cooking requires liquid to achieve pressure, you’ll generally thicken the flavorful pressure cooking liquids after pressure cooking. Using flour or cornstarch before pressure cooking can interfere with the pressure cooking process. Skip flouring your meat before browning it and use the flour in a slurry at the end to thicken the gravy.

I intentionally use many methods for thickening sauces and gravies in my recipes. A cornstarch slurry (whisking cornstarch and cold water) is probably the easiest method, but I also use a flour slurry, a roux, and blended vegetables, or I simmer sauces until they’re reduced. As long as you add it after pressure cooking, there’s no right or wrong thickener—switch them up as desired!

COOKING FOODS THAT FOAM OR FROTH. Pressure cooking manuals often have warnings about cooking foods that foam in your pressure cooker, and for good reason—if cooked improperly, these foods can interfere with maintaining and releasing pressure. Common foods that froth and foam include pastas, soups, applesauce, beans and split peas, grains such as barley and oatmeal, and high-starch items like potatoes.

When cooking these foods, never fill the pot more than halfway. When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a natural pressure release or an intermittent release, if necessary. If foam starts to come out of the pressure release valve, close it and wait a few minutes. If it works with your recipe, you may also add 1 or 2 tablespoons (15 to 30 ml) oil to the liquids in the cooking pot to reduce the foaming.

COOKING FROZEN MEATS. You get better results if you don’t cook large cuts of frozen meat. A frozen roast doesn’t brown well, cook as evenly, or absorb marinades—and it’s hard to judge how much time it will take. However, if you want to cook from frozen, lots of people do. A good rule is to add 5 minutes of cook time per inch (2.5 cm) of thickness.

If your recipe calls for diced meat, but you forgot to defrost it the night before, use your pressure cooker to defrost and partially cook smaller cuts of frozen meats, such as chicken breasts. Simply pour 1 cup (235 ml) water into your pressure cooking pot, place a trivet in the bottom, and arrange the frozen chicken breasts on the trivet. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 1 minute cook time. When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. Remove the chicken from the pot and dice it into small pieces and continue with the recipe as directed.

PLAN AHEAD. Making a meal plan that covers several days can save you even more time in the kitchen. Here are some tricks I use in my own cooking:

• Plan your meals to double up on common items. For example, make a double batch of white rice to eat with a meal like Beef and Broccoli, and save half the rice for Ham Fried Rice the next day.

• When you bring meat home from the grocery store that you don’t plan to use right away, cut it into bite-size pieces and freeze them flat. Bite-size pieces of meat thaw quickly, and you can use them frozen, without thawing or changing the recipe timing.

• Chop all the vegetables you’ll use throughout the week at the same time so that they’re ready to go on busy nights. Try to plan multiple meals that use the same vegetables, for instance, Creamy Chicken and Wild Rice Soup and Pasta Fagioli. Store the different amounts in separate containers.

• Chopped onion freezes well, so if a recipe uses only half an onion, dice the entire onion and freeze half for another recipe.

• Freeze leftovers in single-serve portions. Many soups freeze well, but soups with noodles, potatoes, or rice freeze better if you freeze the noodles, potatoes, or rice in separate single-serving bags and reheat the two separately.

REHEAT FOODS. Reheating in the pressure cooker helps keep foods moist and avoids the changes in flavor and texture that you get from reheating in the microwave. To reheat leftovers, pour 1 cup (235 ml) water into the pressure cooking pot and place a trivet in the bottom. Put the food in an ovenproof dish and place the dish on the trivet. Cook on High Pressure for about 5 minutes, depending on the amount of the food, and use a quick pressure release.

CONVERTING A REGULAR RECIPE FOR A PRESSURE COOKER

Before you try to convert your favorite recipes for the electric pressure cooker, I recommend cooking several recipes from this cookbook to become familiar with the process. Once you have some experience and feel ready to start converting recipes to pressure cooker recipes, remember that even the most experienced cooks do not always get perfect results on the first try—look at recipe conversion as a process.

Keep a notebook and write down the changes you make to the original recipe and tweaks you’d like to try the next time you make it—if it’s not written down, it’s unlikely you’ll get the same results! Once you adapt a couple of recipes, it gets easier. You’ll learn to trust your instincts.

When I find a recipe I’m interested in converting to a pressure cooker recipe, I answer the following questions:

1. Is the recipe a good choice for the pressure cooker?

Because the pressure cooker requires liquid to achieve pressure, an ideal pressure cooker recipe calls for some liquid. Recipes originally written for slow cookers with marinades—as well as stovetop recipes for most soups, meats with gravy, and legumes and grains—are generally easily adapted to the pressure cooker.

If you want a crispy fried coating on your meat or veggies, or if you’re cooking meat that’s very lean or expensive and already tender, the pressure cooker is probably not the best method.

The pressure cooker excels at turning tough, fatty meats into tender, succulent meals. It also makes quick soups that taste like they’ve simmered all day long, and it’s perfect for cooking vegetables—I love it for potatoes and spaghetti squash. The pressure cooker is the only way I cook rice now, and it makes cooking dried beans a breeze.

Not every recipe is faster to cook in the pressure cooker, but even if it’s not faster, it’s often easier and tastier cooked this way. You get long-simmered, marinated flavors in a fraction of the time.

2. How do I know what cook time to use?

I find it’s much easier to modify an existing pressure cooker recipe than to start from scratch by using a chart to figure out cook times and amounts of liquid needed—especially when cooking multiple ingredients at the same time. I’ve intentionally developed recipes for this book that use a variety of meats, so you can use this cookbook as a resource in adapting your own recipes.

For example, we eat a lot of chicken at my house, so I’ve created recipes using whole chicken, bone-in and boneless breasts (both diced and whole), thighs, wings, and legs. If you want to adapt your favorite chicken recipe to the pressure cooker, just match the major ingredients (meats and vegetables) in your recipe with a similar recipe in this cookbook and use that as a guide for cook time and amount of liquid.

If you can’t find a similar recipe here or online, use a reliable chart to determine the cook time for the main ingredient in your recipe. (Cooking charts appear in your pressure cooker’s user manual and are widely posted on a number of pressure cooking websites.)

When converting a pasta recipe, whether you use regular, gluten-free, or whole wheat pasta, you generally divide the cook time listed on the package by 2, then subtract 1 minute. After cooking at High Pressure, if the pasta is not cooked through, select Simmer/Sauté and simmer until the pasta is cooked as desired

To find the proper cook time for meat, I generally reduce the cook time for meat recipes cooked in the oven or on the stove by 50 to 75 percent. For example, if you’re cooking a roast that requires 3 hours in the oven, start with 1 hour cook time in the pressure cooker. Test for doneness with an instant-read thermometer. If the roast needs more time, add up to 30 minutes more of cook time, depending on the internal temperature.

3. What if ingredients have different cook times?

If you’re cooking a dish with meat, the size and shape of the meat matters more than the amount. A large 3-pound (1.36 kg) whole roast needs to cook much longer at High Pressure than 3 pounds (1.36 kg) of the same roast cut into bite-size pieces. Consider whether you can cut your meat so that its cook time matches the cook time for the other ingredients. For example, small bite-size pieces of chicken breast have the same cook time as white rice, so cutting the chicken into bite-size pieces lets you cook the chicken and rice at the same time.

Another option for quick-cooking items is to wrap them in aluminum foil or put them on a trivet on top of the longer-cooking item to slow their cook time.

If you can’t change the size or shape of your ingredients to have similar cook times, consider cooking the ingredient with the longest cook time first and adding the other ingredients and cooking for a few minutes longer. For example, if you think your meat will take 50 minutes to pressure cook and your vegetables will take 5 minutes, cook the meat for 45 minutes and release the pressure. Add the veggies, return the lid, bring the pot back to pressure, and cook for 5 minutes more.

4. How much liquid should I use?

Generally you need at least 1 cup (235 ml) liquid; however, there are instances where you can use less liquid, like when you use ingredients that contain lots of water, such as chicken, fruit, or vegetables. For specific ingredients, consult a recipe in this cookbook or your pressure cooker’s user manual.

Since there’s very little liquid lost when you pressure cook with an electric pressure cooker, you generally have to reduce the liquid in recipes such as soups and braises so that you don’t water down the flavor. A good starting point is reducing the liquid by 25 percent.

5. Do I need to adjust when I add my ingredients to the pressure cooker?

While many recipes can keep the same order as the original recipe, there will be times you need to make modifications. For example, if your recipe starts with a roux or flouring your meat before browning, you need to change the recipe. Flour can create a layer on the bottom of the pressure cooking pot that prevents it from coming to pressure. To prevent issues created by flour or other thickeners, add these ingredients after you release the pressure. Combine the thickener with a little water to make a slurry before adding it to the pot (see Beef and Broccoli).

Jarred syrups and sauces may have thickeners that settle to the bottom of the pressure cooking pot, and dairy products such as heavy cream, yogurt, and cheese can settle or curdle. Add these ingredients after pressure cooking as well.

6. Should I use a natural or quick pressure release?

As discussed in the Releasing Pressure section (see here), meats generally benefit from a natural pressure release; if you’re cooking meats with pasta or vegetables that you’re worried about overcooking, use a quick pressure release.

TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

Once in a while, something goes wrong in the pressure cooking process—it happens to even the best cooks! While many pressure cooker user manuals include brand-specific troubleshooting tips, here is a list of common problems I’m asked about by readers of my blog, Pressure Cooking Today, and my family and friends. In many cases, you can save the meal and get things back on track!

MY LID WON’T LOCK INTO PLACE. Sometimes if the liquid in the pot is hot, the steam pushes the float valve up and the safety mechanism won’t let you lock the lid in place again. Make sure the pressure release valve is in the Venting position so that steam can release, and push the float valve down with the end of a wooden spoon.

STEAM IS COMING FROM MY LID. First, determine where the steam is coming from. If steam is coming from the pressure release valve, double-check that the valve is actually on the lid and is in the Sealing position. If steam is coming from the sides of the lid, it means the lid isn’t sealing properly. There are a few reasons for this. To check, turn off the pressure cooker and use a quick pressure release. When the lid unlocks, remove the lid and check to see that the sealing ring and float valve are properly in place and free of any food particles. If either the float valve or sealing ring needs to be adjusted, wait until the lid is cool enough to handle to avoid the risk of burns.

In rare cases, steam escapes from the sides of the lid because the sealing ring is brittle or broken. If you notice issues with your sealing ring, unfortunately, the only solution is to replace it.

If you notice the steam early in the cooking process, adjust the pressure release valve or the lid and restart the High Pressure cook time. If you suspect a number of minutes went by before you noticed the problem, you may need to add more liquid to your pressure cooking pot or reduce the cook time—there’s no hard rule for how much, so make your best guess.

IT’S TAKING FOREVER FOR MY INGREDIENTS TO COME TO PRESSURE. Remember, if you’re cooking a dish like soup with a lot of liquid or if the ingredients are cold, it can take as many as 30 minutes for the pressure cooker to come to pressure.

If that’s not the problem, you should double-check that the pressure cooker hasn’t been unplugged by mistake. Also, check that you added enough liquid to the pressure cooking pot—pots cannot reach High Pressure without sufficient liquid, and bigger 8- and 10-quart (7.5 and 9.5 L) cookers may need more liquid than their smaller 5- and 6-quart (4.7 and 5.7 L) counterparts.

MY MEAT SCORCHES DURING THE BROWNING PROCESS. In these situations, there are a number of options. If possible, lower the heat setting and add more oil to the pot. If your recipe calls for them, be sure to have liquids measured and ready to add as soon as you’re done browning. You can also lift the cooking pot away from the heating element to slow the cooking process briefly.

THE COOK TIME HAS ENDED, BUT MY FOOD ISN’T COOKED. If your pasta or meat is nearly done, it’s best not to return the pot to High Pressure. Rather, select Simmer/Sauté and finish cooking the dish on that setting. Food can also finish cooking on the Keep Warm setting—simply lock the lid in place and wait a few minutes more.

However, if your meat isn’t close to the proper temperature or isn’t as fall-apart tender as you’d like, lock the lid in place and pressure cook it again for additional time.

Also, if quicker-cooking foods such as vegetables are done, but your meat is not, remove these ingredients from the cooking pot and place them in a bowl covered with aluminum foil. Once your meat is cooked, return the vegetables to the cooking pot and heat through.

MY SAUCE OR GRAVY IS TOO THIN. Different ingredients release different amounts of liquid as they cook, so it’s hard to judge the exact amount of thickeners you need before pressure cooking. For example, chicken injected with water before freezing releases more liquid than a fresh chicken breast. If your original recipe calls for a thickener, remember that thickeners need to reach a temperature near the boiling point before they activate (the exact temperature depends on your altitude), so continue to Simmer/Sauté to heat your dish. If your sauce is still is too thin, mix an equal ratio of thickener and water and add it to your sauce, or simply let the sauce simmer a little longer until the liquid reduces.

If the original recipe doesn’t call for a thickener and your sauce is too thin, make a slurry by whisking 2 tablespoons cornstarch (16 g) with 2 tablespoons (30 ml) cold water until smooth and add it to your sauce.

MY SAUCE OR GRAVY IS TOO THICK. Don’t be afraid to add a little extra liquid and stir until it reaches the consistency you like. The liquid doesn’t have to be water—choose something that matches the ingredients in your meal.

MY SAUCE OR GRAVY IS LUMPY. Don’t panic! Whisk the sauce vigorously, pour it through a fine-mesh sieve or strainer, or use an immersion blender to purée it smooth. Lumpy sauce often results from adding dry thickeners to a hot pot or from not stirring to incorporate them completely with the water, so double-check this step in the future.

MY SILICONE RING SMELLS LIKE YESTERDAY’S DINNER. Unfortunately, the silicone sealing ring and the mini gasket on the float valve have a tendency to take on strong smells, particularly after cooking flavorful, savory meats and soups. I’ve tried many remedies—lemon juice, vinegar, baking soda, and other food-safe cleaners—but haven’t yet found anything that will completely get rid of the smell.

I like to use one ring for savory foods and an extra sealing ring only for mild foods, such as oatmeal and cheesecake. My daughter prefers to use three rings: one for savory dishes, one for breakfasts, and one saved just for cheesecake. She keeps her savory sealing ring inside a sealed zipper bag to keep the smell from transferring to her cupboards. In contrast, I like to store my lids upside down on the pressure cooking pot in my pantry so that the sealing ring has a chance to air out. Again, there’s not a right or wrong way to do it.

{ Chapter 1 }

Breakfasts

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and it’s also my favorite meal. Here’s a great selection of quick, get-you-out-the-door-fast recipes mixed with a handful of slow-morning indulgent recipes.

Very Berry Steel Cut Oats

Carrot Cake Steel Cut Oats

Apple-Cinnamon Oatmeal

Oatmeal for One

Cherry-Orange Breakfast Quinoa

Crustless Ham and Cheese Quiche

Hash Brown Breakfast Casserole

Mexican Breakfast Casserole

Maple-Almond-Raisin Breakfast Risotto

Parmesan, Spinach, and Tomato Egg Muffin

◁ Very Berry Steel Cut Oats

My daughter and her family are crazy about pressure cooker steel cut oats, and she makes a big batch that lasts for a couple of days. She likes the oatmeal thick and loaded with fresh berries. The heat from the oats warms the berries so they melt in your mouth, and the thick oats cool quickly with a splash of cold milk so her family doesn’t have to wait as long to eat. I’m sure you’ll enjoy it as much as they do!

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (28 g) unsalted butter

2 cups (352 g) steel cut oats

61/2 cups (1.5 L) water

1/2 cup (120 ml) heavy cream

1/4 cup (60 g) packed light brown sugar

1/4 cup (21.25 g) dried cranberries

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup (44 g) chia seeds

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

11/2 cups (255 g) fresh berries (raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, or sliced strawberries)

Sliced almonds, for garnish

Milk, for serving

Select Simmer/Sauté and melt the butter in the pressure cooking pot. Add the oats. Toast for about 3 minutes, stirring constantly, until they smell nutty. Stir in the water, heavy cream, brown sugar, cranberries, and salt. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 10 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir in the chia seeds and vanilla. Cover and let sit for 5 minutes until the oats reach your desired thickness. Top with the berries, and finish with a sprinkle of sliced almonds and a splash of milk.

TIP: Chia seeds have a mild nutty flavor and are a good source of protein. If you don’t have them on hand, omit them and reduce the water.

Carrot Cake Steel Cut Oats

The flavors of the classic dessert in a hearty, heart-healthy breakfast.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (14 g) unsalted butter

1 cup (176 g) steel cut oats

1 quart (946 ml) water

1 cup (110 g) grated carrots

3 tablespoons (60 g) pure maple syrup, plus more for serving

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

1/4 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup (110 g) raisins, plus more for serving

1/4 cup (44 g) chia seeds

Chopped nuts, for serving

Milk, for serving

Select Simmer/Sauté and add the butter to the pressure cooking pot to melt. Add the oats. Toast for about 3 minutes, stirring constantly, until they smell nutty. Stir in the water, carrots, maple syrup, cinnamon, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 10 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir in the raisins and chia seeds. Cover and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes until the oats reach your desired thickness. Serve topped with more raisins, maple syrup, chopped nuts, and milk.

TIP: If you don’t have pumpkin pie spice, make your own: Combine 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg, and 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves.

Apple-Cinnamon Oatmeal

Old-fashioned oatmeal made in the pressure cooker is perfect for busy mornings. This dish is ready in no time, giving you the chance to enjoy your coffee before your day starts!

YIELD: 2 TO 3 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (14 g) unsalted butter

2 cups (470 ml) water

1 cup (156 g) old-fashioned oats

1 cup (150 g) diced apple

2 tablespoons (30 g) packed light brown sugar

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

Select Simmer/Sauté and melt the butter in the pressure cooking pot. Add the water, oats, apple, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 1 minute cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir the oatmeal and serve hot with your choice of toppings.

TIP: I top my oatmeal with sliced almonds, extra brown sugar, and a splash of milk around the edges to cool it down. Oatmeal really is a blank slate—change up the toppings to fit what you have on hand.

Oatmeal for One

On weekdays in our busy home, everyone fixes their own breakfast. On cold, snowy days, I crave a hearty, warm breakfast that will keep me going until lunch. Making a single batch of oatmeal in the pressure cooker doesn’t save a lot of time, but you can cook the oatmeal in the same bowl you’ll eat it in, and you can leave the kitchen while it cooks without worrying that your oatmeal will boil over.

YIELD: 1 SERVING

1/2 cup (78 g) old-fashioned oats

1 cup (235 ml) water

Pinch salt

In a small, deep, ovenproof bowl with at least a 2-cup (470 ml) capacity, stir together the oats, water, and salt. Put a trivet in the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Place the bowl on the trivet. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 2 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir the oatmeal and serve hot with your choice of toppings.

TIP: This oatmeal has no added sugar, allowing you to control just how much sweetness you need to start your day.

Cherry-Orange Breakfast Quinoa

This light, fluffy quinoa combines a rise-and-shine orange flavor with tart cherries in a quick fiber- and protein-packed breakfast that will keep you full all morning.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

21/4 cups (540 ml) water

11/2 cups (276 g) uncooked quinoa, well rinsed

2 tablespoons (24 g) sugar

Juice of 1 orange

Zest of 1 orange

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup (80 g) dried cherries, chopped

Milk, sliced almonds, and sugar, for topping

In the pressure cooking pot, combine the water, quinoa, sugar, orange juice, orange zest, and salt. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 1 minute cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Fluff the quinoa with a fork and stir in the cherries. Serve hot topped with milk, sliced almonds, and more sugar, if desired.

TIP: I freeze cooked quinoa in individual portions in freezer bags so I can just grab and go on busy mornings.

◁ Crustless Ham and Cheese Quiche

No crust plus your pressure cooker equals no fuss. This crustless quiche is loaded with ham, cheese, and scallions and cooks up light and fluffy.

YIELD: 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

6 large eggs, well beaten

1/2 cup (120 ml) milk

1/8 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 cup (150 g) diced ham

2 large scallions, white and green parts, chopped

1 cup (115 g) shredded Cheddar cheese

1/4 cup (20 g) shredded Parmesan cheese

Put a metal trivet in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 11/2 cups (360 ml) water.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Set aside.

Spray a 7-inch (18 cm) round cake pan or 11/2-quart (1.4 L) ovenproof dish with nonstick cooking spray. Add the ham, scallions, and Cheddar and mix well. Pour the eggs over the ham mixture and stir to combine. Sprinkle the top with Parmesan. Use a sling to place the dish on the trivet. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 20 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Lift out the dish. You can serve this immediately or pop the dish in a preheated broiler and broil until the top is lightly browned.

TIP: This recipe is easy to customize to your taste. Load this quiche with sausage, bacon, and ham for a hearty meat lover’s special or substitute roasted vegetables for the ham for a healthy start to your day.

Hash Brown Breakfast Casserole

When you crave something a little more substantial to start the day, this easy one-pot hash brown breakfast casserole is sure to become a favorite.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

3 slices bacon, coarsely chopped

1/2 cup (80 g) chopped onion

2 cups (420 g) frozen hash brown potatoes

8 large eggs

1/4 cup (60 ml) milk

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

3/4 cup (90 g) shredded Cheddar cheese, divided

Spray a 7-inch (18 cm) round cake pan or a 11/2-quart (1.4 L) baking dish with nonstick cooking spray.

Select Browning/Sauté and add the bacon to the pressure cooking pot. Fry for about 5 minutes until crisp, stirring occasionally. Transfer the bacon to a paper towel–lined plate, leaving the bacon fat in the pot. Add the onion. Sauté for 3 minutes, stirring frequently. Transfer the onion to the prepared pan and add the cooked bacon and hash browns. Set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Mix in 1/2 cup (60 g) Cheddar. Pour the egg mixture over the hash browns and bacon and stir to combine. Sprinkle the remaining 1/4 cup (30 g) Cheddar on top—do not stir.

Put a trivet in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. (You don’t need to clean the pot after cooking the onion. The water will help clean it as the casserole cooks.) Center the dish on a sling and carefully lower it onto the trivet. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 20 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid and use a paper towel to blot up any water that collected on the casserole. If desired, brown the cheese under a preheated broiler for a few minutes before serving.

TIP: My family prefers crisp bacon. If the bacon doesn’t brown evenly in the pressure cooking pot, after I transfer it to a plate, I put it in the microwave for 30 seconds to crisp up.

Mexican Breakfast Casserole

Spice up your morning with this easy, meaty, cheesy, Mexican-inspired casserole. The tortillas dissolve into the eggs, giving the casserole body and a great corn flavor.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

4 (5 inches, or 13 cm) corn tortillas, torn into bite-size pieces

1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil

1 pound (454 g) ground chorizo or Italian sausage

8 large eggs

1/3 cup (78 ml) milk

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 can (4 oz, or 113 g) diced mild green chilies

1/2 cup (59 g) crumbled queso fresco

3 scallions, white and green parts, chopped

1/2 cup (58 g) shredded Cheddar cheese

Spray a 7-inch (18 cm) round cake pan with a generous amount of nonstick cooking spray. Place the tortilla pieces in the prepared pan.

Select Browning/Sauté to preheat the pressure cooking pot. When hot, add the vegetable oil and chorizo. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until brown and crumbled. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a paper towel–lined plate. Set aside. Drain any excess fat from the pot.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Stir in the green chilies, queso fresco, scallions, and browned chorizo. Pour the egg mixture into the prepared pan and stir to combine. Sprinkle the top with Cheddar.

Put a trivet in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Center the pan on a sling and carefully lower it onto the trivet. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 25 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Lift out the dish. If desired, broil until the cheese is lightly browned.

TIP: Queso fresco is a fresh-tasting, mild Mexican cheese that’s easily crumbled. If it’s not available in your area, substitute a shredded Mexican cheese blend.

◁ Maple-Almond-Raisin Breakfast Risotto

This breakfast risotto is similar to rice pudding but has less fat and sugar. You may find yourself eating it for dessert as well.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (28 g) unsalted butter

11/2 cups (288 g) arborio rice

1 quart (946 ml) unsweetened almond milk, plus more as needed

1/2 cup (75 g) raisins

1/4 cup (80 g) pure maple syrup, plus more for serving

1/4 cup (60 g) packed light brown sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

Sliced almonds, for serving

Select Browning/Sauté and melt the butter in the pressure cooking pot. Stir in the rice. Cook for about 3 minutes, stirring frequently, until fragrant. Stir in the almond milk, raisins, maple syrup, brown sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 6 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir the mixture. Add more almond milk, if needed, to achieve a creamy consistency. Serve topped with maple syrup, sliced almonds, and a splash of almond milk.

TIP: This dish tastes great the next day as well. Add more almond milk before you rewarm it to get that creamy consistency back.

Parmesan, Spinach, and Tomato Egg Muffins

These egg muffins are like crustless mini quiches. This colorful spinach-tomato version is loaded with healthy veggies and makes a great meal on the run.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

8 large eggs

1/4 cup (60 ml) milk

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 cup (30 g) fresh baby spinach, chopped

1/2 cup (90 g) diced seeded tomato

2 scallions, white and green parts, sliced

1/3 cup (26.6 g) shredded Parmesan cheese

Spray 6 (6-ounce, or 170 g) ovenproof custard cups with nonstick cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, milk, salt, and pepper until just blended. Evenly divide the spinach, tomato, and scallions among the custard cups. Pour the egg mixture over the veggies. Sprinkle the Parmesan over each.

Pour 1 cup (235 ml) water into the pressure cooking pot and place a trivet in the bottom. Place 3 custard cups on the trivet and place a second trivet on top. Place the remaining 3 cups on it. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 6 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully open the lid and remove the cups.

TIP: These keep for 1 week in the refrigerator, and they also freeze well. To reheat, microwave on high power for about 30 seconds.

{ Chapter 2 }

Sandwiches, Wraps, Tacos, and More

Sandwiches (and all their variations) aren’t just for lunch—on a busy day, a sandwich is the perfect quick-to-make, quick-to-eat dinner. With your electric pressure cooker, you can make the sandwich fillings ahead of time and freeze them in single-serve or family-size portions.

Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps

Sweet Pork Tostadas

Shredded Chicken Taco Filling

Carnitas Street Tacos

Carne Asada Tacos

Greek Tacos

Ground Beef Tacos

Barbecue Beef Brisket Tacos

Cheesy Baked Chicken Taquitos

Chicken Quesadillas with Avocado Salsa

Buffalo Chicken Tender Sandwiches with Blue Cheese Sauce

Chicken Salad Sandwiches

Tropical Teriyaki Chicken Wraps

Shredded Barbecue Chicken Sandwiches

Three-Ingredient Pulled Pork

Easy French Dip Sandwiches

Egg Salad Sandwiches

Sweet-and-Spicy Sloppy Joes

Beef and Bean Burritos

Shredded Beef Burritos

Bacon-Avocado Sliders

Cuban Sandwiches

Steak and Cheddar Sandwiches

Easy Moo Shu Pork

◁ Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps

Meet my easy pressure cooker version of the popular restaurant lettuce wraps. The crunchy vegetables and pop of color from the scallions and carrots will have your family asking for this again and again.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil

11/2 pounds (680 g) ground chicken

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup (235 ml) reduced-sodium chicken broth

1/2 cup (120 ml) hoisin sauce

1/4 cup (60 ml) low-sodium soy sauce

1 teaspoon chili-garlic sauce, plus more for serving

1/2 cup (98 g) white rice

1 can (8 oz, or 227 g) sliced water chestnuts, drained and diced

1 tablespoon (8 g) cornstarch

1 tablespoon (15 ml) cold water

1 cup (130 g) frozen diced carrots, thawed

3 scallions, white and green parts, sliced

2 heads butter lettuce, for serving

Select Browning/Sauté to preheat the pressure cooking pot. When hot, add the vegetable oil and chicken. Cook for about 5 minutes, crumbling with a spoon, until browned. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more, stirring frequently. Stir in the chicken broth, hoisin sauce, soy sauce, and chili-garlic sauce. Stir in the rice and water chestnuts. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Add the slurry to the pot. Select Simmer/Sauté and cook, stirring constantly, until the sauce reaches your desired thickness. Stir in the carrots and scallions. Serve wrapped in lettuce leaves topped with more chili-garlic sauce or Sriracha, if desired.

TIP: If you’re unable to find butter lettuce, Boston and Bibb lettuce are close substitutes. In a pinch, iceberg or romaine lettuce can also work, or substitute corn or flour tortillas and make Asian chicken tacos.

Sweet Pork Tostadas

Think traditional tostada—a crispy corn shell topped with refried beans, lettuce, tomatoes, cheese, and guacamole—but with the addition of restaurant-style sweet pork. It’s anything but ordinary.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

1 can (7 ounces, or 200 g) diced green chilies

2 cups (470 ml) cola, divided

1/2 cup (130 g) chunky salsa

1/3 cup (75 g) packed light brown sugar

2 tablespoons (32 g) tomato paste

2 teaspoons chili powder

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

4 pounds (1.8 kg) boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) cubes

1 cup (235 ml) red enchilada sauce

8 (5 inches, or 13 cm) white corn tortillas

Refried beans, for serving

Shredded lettuce, for serving

Shredded Mexican cheese, for serving

Guacamole, for serving

Fresh salsa, for serving

In the pressure cooking pot, combine the green chilies, 1 cup (235 ml) cola, the chunky salsa, brown sugar, tomato paste, chili powder, and cumin. Stir to combine. Add the pork. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 25 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

Pour the pot’s contents into a colander to drain the juices; discard them. Shred the pork and put it back into the cooking pot. Stir in the remaining 1 cup (235 ml) cola and enchilada sauce. Select Browning/Sauté and cook until the sauce heats through.

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Lightly spray the tortillas with cooking spray. Place them on a baking sheet and bake for about 5 minutes until crisp and starting to brown. Spread the tortillas with refried beans and top with the pork, lettuce, cheese, guacamole, and salsa.

TIP: Cutting the pork into bite-size pieces before cooking reduces the cook time dramatically and makes this a quick and tasty weeknight meal.

Shredded Chicken Taco Filling

This chicken taco filling is so versatile. It’s great for taco salads, enchiladas, burritos, and more, and it’s very convenient—you don’t even have to thaw the frozen chicken. My neighbor likes this recipe so much, she makes it every week.

YIELD: 12 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil

1 large onion, diced

6 large boneless skinless chicken breasts, frozen

1 can (10 ounces, or 284 g) diced tomatoes and green chilies (Ro-Tel Original)

1 tablespoon (8 g) chili powder

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Select Browning/Sauté to preheat the pressure cooking pot. Add the oil and onion. Sauté for about 3 minutes until tender. Add the chicken, tomatoes and green chilies, chili powder, salt, and pepper. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 12 to 15 minutes cook time, depending on how large your chicken, breasts are. (If using thawed chicken, reduce the cook time by a couple of minutes.)

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Remove the chicken from the pressure cooker, but do not discard the juices in the pot. Shred the chicken and return it to the cooking pot, stirring to combine it with the tomatoes and juices. Select Simmer/Sauté. Cook for about 5 minutes, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until all the liquid is absorbed. Serve immediately or divide into 1-cup (about 200 g) portions and freeze for later.

TIP: If you have a stand mixer, put your cooked chicken in the bowl and use the paddle attachment to shred it. The chicken is shredded in just a few minutes.

◁ Carnitas Street Tacos

I have a favorite taqueria that serves upscale little street tacos with pretty pink pickled onions on top. The pickled onions add color, a burst of flavor, and a nice crunch to the taco—and they’re easy to make.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

FOR PICKLED ONIONS:

1 small red onion, thinly sliced and quartered

1 cup (235 ml) hot water

1/2 cup (120 ml) apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

FOR TACOS:

1 tablespoon (3 g) dried oregano

2 teaspoons ground cumin

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil

6 pounds (2.7 kg) boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut into 4 equal pieces

1 cup (235 ml) fresh orange juice (from about 2 large oranges)

2 onions, quartered

8 cloves garlic, smashed

2 jalapeño peppers, seeded, ribbed, and chopped

Small corn tortillas, queso fresco, fresh cilantro, lime juice, and sour cream, for serving

TO MAKE THE PICKLED ONIONS: In a small bowl, combine the red onion and hot water. Let soak for 1 minute. Drain. In a pint-size (470 ml) Mason jar, whisk the cider vinegar, sugar, and salt until dissolved. Add the red pepper flakes and red onion to the jar. Let sit at room temperature for 1 hour. Drain before using.

TO MAKE THE TACOS: In a small bowl, stir together the oregano, cumin, salt, pepper, and olive oil. Rub this paste over the pork pieces. In the pressure cooking pot, stir together the orange juice, onions, garlic, and jalapeños. Add the pork to the pot. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 50 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Using a large fork or slotted spoon, carefully transfer the meat to a large platter and shred it with 2 forks. Discard any excess fat as you shred. Strain the juices in the cooking pot and set aside.

Serve immediately or crisp the pork before serving. To crisp, preheat the broiler. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and spread the pork in a single layer. Broil for 3 to 5 minutes, or until the edges of the pork start to brown and crisp.

Place the shredded pork in a serving bowl and ladle 1/2 cup (120 ml) reserved cooking liquid over the pork. Serve in warmed tortillas topped with the pickled red onions. Finish with queso fresco, chopped fresh cilantro leaves, a squeeze of lime juice, and sour cream, if desired.

TIP: Make life easier before a big get-together. Prepare the taco meat early in the morning or even a day ahead and reheat it in the pressure cooker with a little reserved cooking liquid.

Carne Asada Tacos

Cooking flank steak in the pressure cooker tenderizes the meat, leaving it melt-in-your-mouth delicious.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (8 g) chili powder

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon onion powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 pounds (907 g) flank steak, cut into 1/4-inch -thick (0.6 cm) strips

1/4 cup (60 ml) water

1/4 cup (60 ml) fresh lime juice

1/4 teaspoon liquid smoke (optional)

Warmed tortillas, queso fresco, and pico de gallo, for serving

In a large bowl, stir together the chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, and pepper. Use clean hands to rub the spices into the steak until it is evenly coated.

In the pressure cooking pot, combine the water, lime juice, liquid smoke (if desired), and steak. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 12 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Select Simmer/Sauté and cook for about 10 minutes until all the liquid is gone, stirring frequently. Serve in the warmed tortillas topped with queso fresco and pico de gallo.

TIP: If you fancy fajitas, sauté sliced onions and bell peppers in a little vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-high heat while the beef cooks. Add these to the warmed tortillas just before serving.

Greek Tacos

This delightful Greek version of tacos is made with tender chunks of seasoned pork braised in herbs and lemon juice, served on warm pita bread with lettuce, tomatoes, and cool, creamy tzatziki sauce.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

FOR PORK:

1 teaspoon dried marjoram

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil

4 pounds (1.8 kg) boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) cubes

1/2 cup (120 ml) fresh lemon juice

1/4 cup (60 ml) water

Pita bread, diced tomato, and lettuce, for serving

FOR TZATZIKI SAUCE:

1 small cucumber, peeled, seeded, and shredded

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup (230 g) plain Greek yogurt

1 tablespoon (15 ml) fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon dried dill weed

1 clove garlic, minced or pressed

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

TO MAKE THE PORK: In a small bowl, stir together the marjoram, salt, pepper, and olive oil. Rub this paste all over the cubed pork. Add the lemon juice and water to the pressure cooking pot. Place the pork in the pot. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 25 minutes cook time.

TO MAKE THE TZATZIKI SAUCE: While the pork cooks, in a fine-mesh strainer, toss the cucumber with the salt. Let the cucumber drain for 15 minutes over a bowl or the sink to remove excess water. In a medium-size bowl, stir together the drained cucumber, yogurt, lemon juice, dill weed, garlic, and pepper until well combined.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the meat to a serving dish. Serve on pita with diced tomatoes, shredded lettuce, and tzatziki sauce.

TIP: This Greek taco meat freezes very well. Freeze in individual portions for quick, easy meals.

Ground Beef Tacos

My mom’s favorite taco was a ground beef taco. You’re going to love that you can start with frozen ground beef and go from frozen to fiesta in 15 minutes.

YIELD: 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

1 cup (235 ml) water

2 teaspoons chili powder

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon onion powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

Dash cayenne pepper

1 pound (454 g) frozen lean ground beef

Add the water to the pressure cooking pot and stir in the chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, and cayenne. Add the frozen ground beef. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. Select Browning/Sauté and cook the mixture for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the water evaporates and the beef is browned and crumbled.

Serve as desired, in flour tortillas or crisp taco shells, with cheese, salsa, lettuce, and tomatoes.

TIP: The cook time in this recipe assumes the ground beef is frozen in a flat square. If you’re using more than 1 pound (454 g) of meat, or if your meat is frozen in a thick slab or ball, you may need to add more High Pressure or Browning/Sauté cook time.

Barbecue Beef Brisket Tacos

These tacos are a fusion of Mexican and barbecue flavors. I first tasted this fantastic flavor combination at a neighborhood street fair, where a local barbecue restaurant serves this as their Wednesday special. I couldn’t resist re-creating these at home in the pressure cooker, so now I can have them any day of the week.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

FOR COLESLAW:

1/2 cup (115 g) mayonnaise

2 tablespoons (30 ml) apple cider vinegar

2 teaspoons sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

4 cups (280 g) coleslaw mix

FOR FILLING:

1/2 cup (120 ml) water

2 tablespoons (15 g) chili powder

1 tablespoon (18 g) salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

3 pounds (1.36 kg) flat-cut beef brisket, halved equally

8 (4 inches, or 10 cm) flour tortillas

1/2 cup (125 g) barbecue sauce, for serving

TO MAKE THE COLESLAW: In a large bowl, stir together the mayonnaise, cider vinegar, sugar, and salt. Add the coleslaw mix and stir until well combined. Refrigerate until serving.

TO MAKE THE FILLING: In the pressure cooking pot, stir together the water, chili powder, salt, pepper, garlic powder, and cayenne. Add the brisket, fat-side up. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 60 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Transfer the brisket to a rimmed baking sheet and shred the meat.

To serve, top the tortillas with 2 tablespoons (28 g) brisket and a drizzle of barbecue sauce, then finish with the coleslaw.

TIP: If you prefer, buy prepared coleslaw at the deli counter instead of making your own.

◁ Cheesy Baked Chicken Taquitos

Taquitos are small, rolled tacos that are often deep-fried. I’ve created a baked version filled with a chicken and cheese filling that comes together quickly in the pressure cooker.

YIELD: 10 SERVINGS

1/2 cup (120 ml) water

1/4 cup (32 g) green salsa, plus more for serving

1 teaspoon chili powder

1/2 teaspoon onion powder

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 large chicken breasts, fresh or frozen

1 tablespoon (15 ml) fresh lime juice

1 package (3 ounces, or 85 g) cream cheese, cubed

10 (6 inches, or 15 cm) flour tortillas

11/2 cups (173 g) shredded Colby Jack cheese

3 tablespoons (3 g) fresh chopped cilantro leaves

2 scallions, white and green parts, chopped

Guacamole and sour cream, for serving

Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6). Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and lightly coat it with nonstick cooking spray.

In the pressure cooking pot, stir together the water, green salsa, chili powder, onion powder, cumin, garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Add the chicken. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 10 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Remove the chicken, shred it, and return it to the pot. Select Simmer/Sauté and cook uncovered for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until all the liquid is absorbed. Stir in the lime juice. A little at a time, stir in the cream cheese until melted.

Divide the chicken mixture among the tortillas, placing it near the bottom. Top with the Colby Jack, cilantro, and scallions. Tightly roll the tortilla around the filling. Place each taquito, seam-side down, on the prepared baking sheet. Spray the tops with cooking spray. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes until crisp and golden-brown on the ends, turning seam-side up halfway through the baking time. Serve with guacamole, green salsa, and sour cream, if desired.

TIP: My family prefers flour tortillas, but corn tortillas work, too.

Chicken Quesadillas with Avocado Salsa

Spicy chicken and creamy avocado salsa blend beautifully inside a crisp, golden-brown tortilla. Cooking the filling in the pressure cooker gets this meal on the table in a snap!

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

FOR QUESADILLAS:

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) diced tomatoes, with liquid

1 can (4.5 ounces, or 128 g) diced green chilies, with liquid

1 teaspoon chili powder

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon onion powder

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 large boneless skinless chicken breasts, fresh or frozen

8 (10 inches, or 25 cm) flour tortillas

2 cups (230 g) shredded Monterey Jack cheese

FOR AVOCADO SALSA:

1 large ripe avocado, peeled, pitted, and diced

1/2 cup (80 g) diced red onion

2 tablespoons (2 g) chopped fresh cilantro leaves

1 tablespoon (15 ml) fresh lemon juice

TO MAKE THE QUESADILLAS: In the pressure cooking pot, mix together the tomatoes, green chilies, chili powder, garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, and salt. Add the chicken. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 8 minutes cook time for fresh chicken, and 10 minutes if using frozen chicken.

TO MAKE THE AVOCADO SALSA: While the chicken cooks, in a small bowl, gently mix together the avocado, red onion, cilantro, and lemon juice. Set aside.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Transfer the chicken to a plate and shred it. Return the shredded chicken to the cooking pot and stir to combine with the tomatoes and juices. Select Browning/Sauté. Cook for about 5 minutes, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until all the liquid is absorbed or evaporates.

Put 1 tortilla in a skillet. Spread 1/4 cup (28.75 g) Monterey Jack on top. Scatter 2 tablespoons (28 g) avocado salsa over the cheese. Top with 1/3 cup (67 g) shredded chicken and an additional 1/4 cup (28.75 g) shredded cheese. Finish with a second tortilla on top. Cover the skillet and cook over medium heat until the tortilla is golden-brown. Flip and cook for a few minutes more, covered, until the tortilla is golden-brown and the cheese melts. Remove from the skillet and use a pizza cutter to slice the quesadilla into 6 wedges. Repeat with the remaining ingredients.

TIP: I like to cook my quesadilla in a dry skillet, but my daughter likes to butter her tortillas before she cooks them.

Buffalo Chicken Tender Sandwiches with Blue Cheese Sauce

The blue cheese sauce cools the heat from the spicy buffalo chicken. If you’re a fan of buffalo chicken wings, I know you’ll cheer for this easy-to-make sandwich.

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

FOR BUFFALO CHICKEN:

1/2 cup (120 ml) water

2 tablespoons (30 ml) hot sauce

12 chicken tenders, frozen or fresh

4 sub rolls, split and toasted

Romaine or iceberg lettuce leaves, for serving

1 small red onion, thinly sliced

FOR BLUE CHEESE SAUCE:

1/3 cup (75 g) mayonnaise

1/3 cup (75 g) sour cream

1 tablespoon (15 ml) lemon juice

Pinch salt and freshly ground black pepper

1/3 cup (40 g) blue cheese, crumbled

TO MAKE THE BUFFALO CHICKEN: Add the water and hot sauce to the pressure cooking pot and stir to combine. Add the chicken tenders. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 2 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the chicken to a plate. Shred the chicken using 2 forks and return it to the liquid in the cooking pot. Select Simmer/Sauté. Cook for about 5 minutes, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until all the liquid is absorbed or evaporates.

TO MAKE THE BLUE CHEESE SAUCE: In a small bowl, whisk the mayonnaise, sour cream, lemon juice, and salt and pepper, until smooth. Stir in the blue cheese.

TO MAKE THE SANDWICHES: Place a scoop of shredded chicken on the bottom of the sub roll and top with lettuce and red onion. Spread the top roll with blue cheese sauce and place it on top of the sandwich. Serve any remaining blue cheese sauce for dipping, if desired.

TIP: I prefer Frank’s RedHot sauce, but feel free to substitute your favorite.

Chicken Salad Sandwiches

Chicken salad sandwiches are perfect for everyday lunches yet elegant enough to serve at parties on mini croissants. The celery, pecans, and grapes combine to add crispy, crunchy, juicy notes to brighten each bite.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

2 large boneless skinless chicken breasts, diced into bite-sized pieces

11/2 cups (360 ml) water

1/4 cup (60 g) mayonnaise

1/4 cup (60 g) sour cream

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 cup (60 g) diced celery

1/2 cup (75 g) quartered grapes

1 scallion, white and green parts, chopped

1/4 cup (28 g) chopped pecans, toasted

6 sandwich rolls or mini croissants, halved and toasted

In the pressure cooking pot, combine the diced chicken and water. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Transfer the chicken to a plate to cool and discard the cooking water.

In a large bowl, stir together the mayonnaise, sour cream, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Add the cooled chicken, celery, grapes, and scallion. Gently toss to combine. Cover and chill for at least 1 hour. Stir in the pecans just before serving on the toasted sandwich rolls or mini croissants.

TIP: If your favorite chicken salad is loaded with celery, grapes, scallions, and pecans, double the amounts used in the recipe.

Tropical Teriyaki Chicken Wraps

Teriyaki chicken is typically grilled, but this quick-cooking pressure cooker version is so flavorful you won’t miss the grill at all. The colorful, fresh pineapple salsa really pulls this dish together.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

FOR TERIYAKI CHICKEN:

18 chicken tenders

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

1/4 cup (60 ml) low-sodium soy sauce

2 tablespoons (30 g) packed light brown sugar

2 tablespoons (30 ml) rice vinegar

2 tablespoons (30 ml) pineapple juice

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

2 tablespoons (16 g) cornstarch

2 tablespoons (30 ml) cold water

6 large tortillas

Chopped romaine lettuce, for serving

FOR FRESH PINEAPPLE SALSA:

2 cups (310 g) fresh pineapple cubes (1/2 inch, or 1 cm)

1/3 cup (55 g) finely chopped red onion

1/4 cup (4 g) chopped fresh cilantro leaves

1 small jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely chopped

2 tablespoons (30 ml) fresh lime juice

1 tablespoon (15 g) packed light brown sugar

TO MAKE THE TERIYAKI CHICKEN: Season the chicken tenders with salt and pepper. Set aside. In the pressure cooking pot, stir together the soy sauce, brown sugar, rice vinegar, pineapple juice, garlic powder, and ginger. Add the chicken. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 3 minutes cook time.

TO MAKE THE FRESH PINEAPPLE SALSA: While the chicken cooks, in a large bowl, combine the pineapple, red onion, cilantro, and jalapeño. In a small bowl, whisk the lime juice and brown sugar. Add this to the pineapple mixture and toss to combine. Set aside.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Transfer the chicken to a bowl and shred it into large pieces with 2 forks. Leave the juices in the pot.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Select Simmer/Sauté and add the slurry to the pot, stirring constantly until the sauce thickens. Stir 1 cup (235 ml) thickened sauce into the shredded chicken.

To serve, place a tortilla on a plate. Layer with a spoonful of teriyaki chicken, pineapple salsa, and lettuce. If desired, spoon more teriyaki sauce on top. Fold in the tortilla ends and roll into a wrap.

TIP: If you’re trying to reduce carbs, serve this as a lettuce wrap. This chicken also works well served over rice for a Hawaiian-themed rice bowl.

◁ Shredded Barbecue Chicken Sandwiches

When you’re craving pulled pork but need something quicker, these shredded barbecue chicken sandwiches are just the ticket.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

2 cups (500 g) barbecue sauce, divided, plus more for serving

1 cup (235 ml) water

1 teaspoon liquid smoke

1 large onion, quartered

3 cloves garlic, smashed

4 large boneless skinless chicken breasts

8 sandwich rolls, toasted

In the pressure cooking pot, stir together 1 cup (250 g) barbecue sauce, the water, and liquid smoke. Add the onion, garlic, and chicken breasts. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 6 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Transfer the chicken to a plate and shred it with 2 forks. Strain the cooking liquid, reserving 1/2 cup (120 ml).

Return the chicken to the cooking pot and add the remaining 1 cup (250 g) barbecue sauce and reserved cooking liquid. Stir to combine. Select Simmer/Sauté and bring the mixture to a simmer, stirring frequently. Serve on toasted rolls topped with barbecue sauce.

TIP: Toasting the rolls helps keep the sauce from making them soggy—so don’t skip that step.

Three-Ingredient Pulled Pork

Pulled pork doesn’t have to take all day. This easy pulled pork gives you the flavor of slow-cooked pulled pork in a fraction of the time—and with only three ingredients, you’re out of the kitchen in a flash.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil

4 pounds (1.8 kg) boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut into 4 equal pieces

2 cups (500 g) barbecue sauce, divided, plus more for serving

1/2 cup (120 ml) water

8 sandwich rolls, toasted

Select Browning/Sauté and add the vegetable oil to the cooking pot. When the oil is hot, add 2 pieces of pork. Brown for about 3 minutes per side. When browned, transfer to a platter and repeat with the remaining 2 pieces.

Add 1 cup (250 g) barbecue sauce and 1/2 cup (120 ml) water to the cooking pot. Add the browned pork and any accumulated juices. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 60 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a natural pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Carefully transfer the meat to a bowl and shred it with 2 forks, discarding any excess fat.

Strain the cooking liquid into a fat separator and reserve 1/2 cup (120 ml). Return the shredded pork to the cooking pot. Stir in the remaining 1 cup (250 g) barbecue sauce and reserved cooking liquid. Select Simmer/Sauté and bring to a simmer, stirring frequently. Serve on toasted rolls with more barbecue sauce, if desired.

TIP: I brown the roast to deepen the flavor a bit, but you can skip that step if you’re in a hurry or feeling a bit lazy. Some days are like that.

Easy French Dip Sandwiches

French dip sandwiches don’t get much easier than this! The meat cooks in an easy-to-make beef and onion broth that starts with a packet of dried onion soup mix, so there’s not even any chopping to do.

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

11/2 pounds (680 g) boneless beef top round roast, thinly sliced

1 can (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml) reduced-sodium beef broth

1 packet dried onion soup mix

1 teaspoon finely crushed dried rosemary

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

Butter, for the sub rolls

4 sub rolls, sliced lengthwise

8 slices of provolone cheese

In the pressure cooking pot, combine the beef, beef broth, onion soup mix, rosemary, and garlic powder. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 10 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

Remove the meat from the broth. Strain the broth and skim off any fat. Butter and toast the sub rolls under a preheated broiler. Top each roll with meat and 2 slices of cheese. Broil again, just until the cheese melts and starts to bubble. Serve the broth in small cups for dipping.

TIP: I generally have the butcher slice meat for me; if you slice it yourself, put the roast in the freezer for about 30 minutes before slicing—meat is easier to slice when it’s slightly frozen.

◁ Egg Salad Sandwiches

I am crazy about making hard-boiled eggs in the pressure cooker. Now we keep hard-boiled eggs in the fridge all the time, and it’s easy to make these quick egg salad sandwiches.

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

8 large eggs

1/4 cup (60 g) mayonnaise

1/4 cup (60 g) sour cream

1 teaspoon yellow mustard

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

1/4 cup (30 g) diced celery

1 scallion, white and green parts, chopped

8 slices white bread

Lettuce leaves, for serving

Put a steamer basket in the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Carefully place the eggs in the steamer basket. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 6 minutes cook time.

While the eggs cook, prepare a large bowl of ice water and set aside.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 6 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Immediately transfer the steamer basket with the eggs into the ice water to stop the cooking. When completely cool, peel and dice the eggs. Set aside.

In a large bowl, mix together the mayonnaise, sour cream, and mustard. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add the diced eggs, celery, and scallion. Gently toss to combine. Spread 4 slices of bread with egg salad, then top with a lettuce leaf and the remaining 4 slices of bread.

TIP: The pressure cooker makes great hard-boiled eggs that are easy to peel—the shells practically fall off. The perfect cook time varies a bit for everyone, so if 6 minutes is a little too long for you, reduce the High Pressure cook time by 1 minute or use a quick pressure release.

Sweet-and-Spicy Sloppy Joes

There’s no need to buy sloppy joe sauce in a can when it’s so easy and inexpensive to make your own from ingredients you probably already have in your cupboard.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

2 pounds (907 g) lean ground beef

1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 can (28 ounces, or 794 g) crushed tomatoes in purée

1 cup (235 ml) water

1 tablespoon (15 g) packed light brown sugar

2 tablespoons (30 ml) Worcestershire sauce

2 teaspoons chili powder

1 teaspoon dry mustard

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

8 sandwich buns, toasted

Select Browning/Sauté. Brown the ground beef for about 5 minutes in the pressure cooking pot, stirring occasionally until the beef crumbles and is no longer pink. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate. Drain any excess fat from the pot.

Add the vegetable oil and onion to the cooking pot. Sauté for about 3 minutes until tender. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute more. Stir in the tomatoes, water, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, chili powder, dry mustard, salt, and pepper. Add the browned beef and stir to combine. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Select Browning/Sauté and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the sauce reaches your desired thickness. Serve on toasted buns.

TIP: If your family likes green bell peppers, dice one and add it with the onion.

Beef and Bean Burritos

My daughter prefers her burritos with rice and beans as well as meat. This recipe lets you cook all three at the same time.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil, divided

1 pound (454 g) lean ground beef

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

3 cloves garlic, minced

2 teaspoons chili powder

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 can (15 ounces, or 425 g) black beans, drained and rinsed

1 cup (235 ml) reduced-sodium beef broth

1/2 cup (93 g) long-grain white rice

1 can (4 ounces, or 115 g) diced green chilies

Juice of 1 lime

2 tablespoons (2 g) chopped fresh cilantro leaves (optional)

6 burrito-size tortillas

Shredded Monterey Jack cheese, for serving

Salsa, for serving

Select Browning/Sauté to preheat the cooking pot. When hot, add 1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil and the ground beef. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the beef is browned and crumbled. With a slotted spoon, transfer the beef to a paper towel–lined plate.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil and onion to the cooking pot. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onion is tender. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Stir in the browned beef, chili powder, cumin, and salt. Sauté for 2 minutes. Add the black beans, beef broth, rice, and green chilies. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 3 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir in the lime juice and cilantro.

Warm the tortillas in the microwave for 1 minute. Spread a small amount of the beef and bean mixture down the center of each tortilla and top with Monterey Jack and salsa. Fold the ends of the tortillas over and roll them up.

TIP: The spice level in this recipe is mild. If you like things a little hotter, double the chili powder.

Shredded Beef Burritos

My son adores this classic burrito—tender, juicy, not-too-spicy shredded beef wrapped in a soft flour tortilla and served with his favorite toppings. Customize this for your family with their favorite toppings.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

1/2 cup (120 ml) reduced-sodium beef broth

3 tablespoons (23 g) chili powder

1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 (3 pounds, or 1.4 kg) chuck roast, cut into 3 equal pieces

Burrito-size flour tortillas

Shredded cheese, Mexican rice, and black beans, for filling (optional)

Sour cream, guacamole, fresh salsa, for serving (optional)

In the pressure cooking pot, stir together the beef broth, chili powder, paprika, cumin, garlic powder, oregano, salt, and pepper. Add the roast pieces. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 50 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Transfer the beef to a work surface and shred it with 2 forks, discarding any fat. Transfer the cooking liquid to a fat separator. Return the shredded beef and 1 cup (235 ml) cooking liquid to the cooking pot and stir to combine. Select Simmer/Sauté and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until most of the liquid is absorbed or evaporates.

Place 1/2 cup (about 115 g) beef in the center of a tortilla, add cheese and additional fillings of your choice (if desired). Fold in the edges and roll up into a burrito. Repeat with the remaining tortillas. Served topped with sour cream, guacamole, and fresh salsa (if desired).

TIP: If you like a smothered burrito, top these with your favorite enchilada sauce and shredded cheese. Broil for 2 to 4 minutes until the cheese is bubbly. Watch closely because the cheese browns quickly once it starts.

Bacon-Avocado Sliders

Sliders are always fun to serve when you have a crowd. These tasty sliders can be browned ahead of time and finished right before serving so that you can enjoy the party, too.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

8 slices bacon, halved widthwise

2 pounds (907 g) ground beef (don’t use lean ground beef)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

12 slider buns, toasted

1 avocado, peeled, pitted, and sliced

Select Browning/Sauté and add the bacon to the pressure cooking pot in small batches. Fry for about 3 minutes, until crisp but still soft, stirring frequently. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate to cool. Turn off the pressure cooker and remove the cooking pot from the pressure cooker. Leave the bacon fat in the pot.

In a large bowl, mix together the ground beef, 1 tablespoon (15 ml) bacon fat, and the cooked bacon, crumbled. Form the mixture into 12 patties, about 3 ounces (85 g) each and slightly wider than the buns. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Return the cooking pot to the pressure cooker. Select Browning/Sauté. Add the sliders, 4 at a time, and cook for about 3 minutes per side to brown. Transfer to a plate when browned.

When all patties are browned, place a trivet in the cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Place the browned patties on the trivet, staggering them as you stack them. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 3 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Serve the sliders on toasted buns topped with avocado and your favorite burger toppings.

TIP: You get a more flavorful, juicier burger if you don’t use lean ground beef.

◁ Cuban Sandwiches

My husband and I had our first Cuban sandwich when we were in Miami on vacation. It was love at first bite.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

1/3 cup (78 ml) olive oil

10 cloves garlic, minced or pressed

3/4 cup (175 ml) fresh orange juice

3/4 cup (175 ml) fresh lime juice

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

4 pounds (1.8 kg) boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut into 4 equal pieces

Dijon mustard, for serving

8 Cuban bread rolls or sub rolls, sliced lengthwise

8 slices black forest ham

8 slices Swiss cheese

8 sandwich-size dill pickles

Select Browning/Sauté and add the olive oil to the cooking pot. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and sauté for 30 seconds. Stir in the orange juice, lime juice, oregano, cumin, salt, and pepper. Use a ladle to remove 1 cup (235 ml) of this Mojo sauce for dipping the sandwiches. Add the pork to the pot. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 60 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Carefully transfer the meat to a bowl and shred it with 2 forks, discarding any excess fat. Skim the fat off the liquid in the pot. Add 1/2 cup (120 ml) cooking liquid to the shredded pork.

Spread mustard on the bottom halves of the rolls. Top with cooked pork, ham, cheese, and pickles. Place the top half of the roll on top. Put the sandwiches into a preheated panini press and grill for 5 to 6 minutes until the cheese melts and the bread is toasted. If you don’t have a panini press, cook the sandwich in a heavy skillet weighed down with a heavy lid or pan. Serve with the reserved Mojo sauce for dipping.

TIP: You can purchase bottled Mojo sauce at the grocery store—add 1 cup (235 ml) sauce to the pressure cooking pot before you add the pork.

Steak and Cheddar Sandwiches

A classic hot beef and Cheddar sandwich gets kicked up a notch with steak. Don’t skip the hot sauce in the cheese sauce—it doesn’t add much heat, but it does add a ton of flavor.

YIELD: 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

FOR STEAK:

1 to 3 tablespoons (15 to 45 ml) vegetable oil, divided

2 pounds (907 g) boneless beef sirloin steak, sliced against the grain into 1/4-inch-thick (0.6 cm) slices

1/2 cup (120 ml) reduced-sodium beef broth

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

8 onion hamburger buns, toasted

FOR CHEESE SAUCE:

2 tablespoons (28 g) unsalted butter

2 tablespoons (14 g) all-purpose flour

1 cup (235 ml) milk

2 teaspoons hot sauce (I use Frank’s RedHot)

1/4 teaspoon salt

11/2 cups (173 g) shredded Cheddar cheese

TO MAKE THE STEAK: Add 1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil to the pressure cooking pot and quickly brown the beef strips on one side. Work in batches, adding more vegetable oil as needed, until all the meat is browned on one side. Transfer the meat to a plate when browned.

Add the beef broth, garlic powder, salt, and pepper to the cooking pot and stir to combine. Return the browned beef to the pot. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 12 minutes cook time.

TO MAKE THE CHEESE SAUCE: While the beef cooks, in a medium-size saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. Sprinkle in the flour and cook until bubbling. Gradually whisk in the milk a little at a time until the sauce is smooth and thick. Whisk in the hot sauce and salt. Add the Cheddar a handful at a time and stir until melted and smooth. Remove from the heat.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. To serve, top each bun with a mound of beef slices and ladle cheese sauce on top.

TIP: Lightly butter the hamburger buns and toast in a 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4) oven for about 5 minutes until golden-brown.

Easy Moo Shu Pork

A favorite at Chinese restaurants, this easy pressure cooker version uses Mexican tortillas instead of the traditional moo shu pancakes.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil

2 large eggs, beaten

1/2 cup (120 ml) water

1/4 cup (60 ml) low-sodium soy sauce

2 tablespoons (32 g) smooth peanut butter

1 tablespoon (20 g) honey

1 tablespoon (15 ml) white vinegar

1/2 teaspoon Sriracha

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

11/2 pounds (680 g) pork loin or boneless pork chops, sliced into thin strips

1 package (8 ounces, or 227 g) fresh mushrooms, thinly sliced

1 can (8 ounces, or 227 g) bamboo shoots, sliced matchstick style

2 tablespoons (16 g) cornstarch

3 tablespoons (45 ml) cold water

2 teaspoons sesame oil

1 bag (14 ounces, or 397 g) coleslaw

1 scallion, white and green parts, chopped

12 thin flour tortillas

Select Simmer/Sauté to preheat the pressure cooking pot. When hot, add the vegetable oil and coat the bottom of the pot. Add the eggs and cook for about 3 minutes, without stirring, to create an omelet. Turn off the pressure cooker. Transfer the omelet to a cutting board and slice it into small, thin pieces.

Add the water, soy sauce, peanut butter, honey, white vinegar, Sriracha, garlic powder, and pepper to the pressure cooking pot and stir to combine. Stir in the pork, mushrooms, and bamboo shoots. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Add the slurry to the pot. Select Simmer/Sauté and simmer for a few minutes, stirring constantly, until the sauce thickens. Stir in the sesame oil, coleslaw, and chopped egg. Transfer to a serving bowl and garnish with scallions. To serve, divide the pork mixture among the tortillas and roll up to enclose.

TIP: To change things up or to cut some carbs, serve the Moo Shu Pork in lettuce leaves.

{ Chapter 3 }

Soup’s On

Soups made in the pressure cooker taste exactly like soups that simmer for hours on the stovetop. No need to serve your family soup from a can when you can have many homemade soups from your pressure cooker to the table in under 30 minutes.

Creamy Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

Louisiana Gumbo

Chicken and Gnocchi Soup

White Chicken Chili

Spicy Chicken Soup

Butternut Squash Soup with Chicken and Orzo

Lighter Zuppa Toscana

Quick Turkey Chili

Chili con Carne

All-American Beef Stew

Hearty Beef and Barley Soup

Pasta Fagioli

Minestrone

Posole (Pork and Hominy Stew)

Creamy Swiss Onion Soup

Broccoli Cheese Soup

Garden Fresh Tomato, Basil, and Parmesan Soup

Chunky Potato Cheese Soup

Rhode Island Clam Chowder

Cabbage Patch Stew

Bean with Bacon Soup

Creamy Red Lentil Soup

13-Bean Soup

Country-Style French Chicken Stew

Sausage, Kale, and White Bean Soup

Italian Wedding Soup

Cheeseburger Soup

Asian Chicken Noodle Soup

Chicken Noodle Soup with Homemade Chicken Stock

Pumpkin, Chorizo, and Black Bean Soup

Ratatouille Soup

Sue’s Hearty Taco Soup

Creamy Golden Mushroom Soup

Ham and Split Pea Soup

Home-Style Vegetable Beef Soup

Creamy Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

A rich, creamy chicken and wild rice soup loaded with chicken, long-grain and wild rice, carrots, onions, and celery. This warm, hearty soup is perfect for cold snowy days.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (32 g) unsalted butter

1 cup (160 g) chopped onion

1 cup (130 g) diced carrots

1 cup (120 g) diced celery

2 large boneless skinless chicken breasts, diced into bite-sized pieces

2 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth

1 package (6 ounces, or 170 g) Uncle Ben’s Long-Grain and Wild Rice (discard seasoning packet)

1 tablespoon (1 g) dried parsley

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Dash red pepper flakes

2 tablespoons (16 g) cornstarch

2 tablespoons (30 ml) cold water

4 ounces (113 g) cream cheese, cubed

1 cup (235 ml) milk

1 cup (235 ml) half-and-half

Select Browning/Sauté and melt the butter in the pressure cooking pot. Add the onion, carrots, and celery. Sauté for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender. Stir in the chicken, chicken broth, rice, parsley, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Select Simmer/Sauté and add the slurry to the pot stirring constantly. Stir in the cream cheese until melted. Stir in the milk and half-and-half, heat through—do not bring to a boil—and serve.

TIP: My Pressure Cooking Today blog readers have had success substituting regular wild rice in this recipe instead of the long-grain wild rice blend.

Louisiana Gumbo

Gumbo is a Louisiana stew thickened with a flavorful roux and loaded with veggies, chicken, sausage, and seafood.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1/2 cup (120 ml) vegetable oil, divided

1 pound (454 g) Andouille sausage, halved lengthwise and cut into 1/4-inch -thick (0.6 cm) slices

3 large boneless skinless chicken breasts

1/2 cup (56 g) all-purpose flour

1 large onion, diced

2 ribs celery, sliced

1/2 green bell pepper, chopped

4 cloves garlic, minced

5 cups (1.2 L) reduced-sodium chicken broth

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) diced tomatoes

2 cups (about 200 g) frozen sliced okra

1 tablespoon (15 ml) Worcestershire sauce

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

8 ounces (227 g) small cooked shrimp, peeled and deveined

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

2 scallions, white and green parts, sliced, for garnish

Select Browning/Sauté to preheat the pressure cooking pot. Add 1/4 cup (60 ml) vegetable oil and the sausage. Cook for about 3 minutes until browned. Transfer to a plate. Add the chicken. Cook for about 3 minutes per side to brown. Transfer to a cutting board and cut the chicken into bite-size pieces.

Add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil to the cooking pot and sprinkle the flour over the oil. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring constantly, until the roux is medium to dark brown. Transfer to a bowl to cool.

Add the remaining 2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil to the cooking pot along with the onion, celery, and green bell pepper. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onion is tender. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Stir in the chicken broth, tomatoes, okra, Worcestershire sauce, cayenne, chicken, and sausage. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Select Simmer/Sauté and add the roux to the pot. Stir until the gumbo thickens. Add the shrimp and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

TIP: Gumbo is traditionally served over steamed or dirty rice.

Chicken and Gnocchi Soup

This soup is a copycat version of a popular restaurant soup, but making it in the pressure cooker is so easy, you may never go out for it again.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (14 g) unsalted butter

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

1/2 cup (60 g) diced celery

2 cloves garlic, minced

11/2 quarts (1.4 L) reduced-sodium chicken broth

2 large boneless skinless chicken breasts, fresh or frozen

2 tablespoons (3 g) dried parsley

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)

2 packages (1 pound, or 454 g, each) potato gnocchi

1 cup (110 g) finely shredded carrots

1 cup (30 g) coarsely chopped fresh spinach

3 tablespoons (24 g) cornstarch

3 tablespoons (45 ml) cold water

2 cups (470 ml) half-and-half

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

Select Browning/Sauté and melt the butter in the pressure cooking pot. Add the onion and celery. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute more. Stir in the chicken broth, chicken, parsley, thyme, and red pepper flakes (if desired). Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board and cut it into bite-size pieces. Return the chicken to the pot and add the gnocchi and carrots. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 1 minute cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 15 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Add the spinach and stir until wilted.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Select Simmer/Sauté and add the slurry to the pot, stirring constantly until the soup thickens. Stir in the half-and-half. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve.

TIP: Gnocchi are small dumplings made from potato and flour. Look for them in the pasta section at the market.

White Chicken Chili

This is my favorite chili! It’s quick to make—only 5 minutes in the pressure cooker—but tastes like it’s been simmering all day.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil

1 large onion, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed

3 cups (about 1 pound, or 454 g) diced chicken

2 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth

1 jar (16 ounces, or 454 g) salsa verde

1 can (4 ounces, or 113 g) diced green chilies

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

2 cans (15.5 ounces, or 440 g, each) cannellini beans or other white bean, drained and rinsed

2 tablespoons (16 g) cornstarch

3 tablespoons (45 ml) cold water

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

Sour cream, diced avocado, tortilla chips, and shredded cheese, for serving

Select Browning/Sauté and add the vegetable oil to the pressure cooking pot. When the oil is hot, add the onion. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onion is tender. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Stir in the chicken, chicken broth, salsa verde, green chilies, cumin, red pepper flakes, and beans. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Select Simmer/Sauté and add the slurry to the pot, stirring constantly until the chili thickens. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Served topped with sour cream, diced avocado, tortilla chips, and shredded cheese, if desired.

TIP: You can make this recipe with cooked chicken as well. I often buy a rotisserie chicken to use in quick, easy recipes like this, or I’ll use leftover chicken from another meal. The total cook time is the same with cooked or uncooked chicken.

Spicy Chicken Soup

A quick-to-throw-together chicken soup with a Mexican twist, loaded with chicken, black beans, corn, tomatoes, and salsa. Top with your favorite Mexican cheese, sour cream, crushed tortilla chips, and maybe a jalapeño or two.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (3 g) dried parsley

1 tablespoon (7 g) onion powder

1 tablespoon (8 g) chili powder

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil

1 large onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced or pressed

4 boneless skinless chicken breasts

2 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth

2 cans (14.5 ounces, or 411 g, each) peeled and diced tomatoes

1 jar (16 ounces, or 454 g) chunky salsa

2 cans (15 ounces, or 425 g, each) black beans, drained and rinsed

1 package (15 ounces, or 425 g) frozen corn

Shredded cheese, sour cream, and tortilla chips, for serving

In a small bowl, mix together the parsley, onion powder, chili powder, pepper, garlic powder, and salt. Set aside.

Select Browning/Sauté and add the olive oil and onion to the pressure cooking pot. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onion is tender. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Stir in the chicken, chicken broth, tomatoes, salsa, and spice mixture. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 8 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Remove the chicken from the soup and shred the meat. Return the chicken to the pot and stir in the black beans and corn.

If needed, select Simmer/Sauté and bring the soup to a boil, stirring occasionally until the beans and corn are heated. Serve topped with shredded cheese, sour cream, and tortilla chips, if desired.

TIP: You can use frozen boneless skinless chicken breasts in this recipe. Adjust the cook time to 11 minutes. You can also substitute 2 tablespoons (7 g) dried onion and 1 teaspoon dried minced garlic for the fresh onion and garlic. Add these ingredients to the other spices and skip the sauté step.

Butternut Squash Soup with Chicken and Orzo

Smooth, creamy, and delicious! The black pepper and red pepper flakes give this soup a bit of heat, and the half-and-half gives it great body and beautiful color. It can stand on its own without the chicken and orzo, but I made the addition since my family prefers a heartier soup. On busy nights, I often use rotesserie chicken.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

3 tablespoons (42 g) unsalted butter

1/2 cup (50 g) diced scallions, white and green parts, plus more for serving

1/2 cup (60 g) diced celery

1/2 cup (65 g) diced carrots

1 clove garlic, minced

2 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) diced tomatoes with juice

11/2 pounds (680 g) butternut squash, peeled, cubed, and roasted

1/2 teaspoon Italian seasoning

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

1 cup (140 g) cooked diced chicken

1 cup (about 8 ounces, or 227 g) orzo, cooked

1/2 cup (60 ml) half-and-half, plus more for serving

Scallions, for garnish

Select Browning/Sauté and melt the butter in the pressure cooking pot. Add the scallions, celery, and carrots. Sauté for about 3 minutes until tender. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Stir in the chicken broth, tomatoes, squash, Italian seasoning, pepper, red pepper flakes, and nutmeg. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 10 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Use an immersion blender to purée the soup until very smooth. (You can also use a standard blender.)

Select Simmer/Sauté. Add the chicken, orzo, and 1/2 cup (120 ml) half-and-half. Heat for about 5 minutes until the chicken is heated through. Serve garnished with scallions and a swirl of half-and-half.

TIP: The soup has a richer flavor if you use roasted squash. Roast the cubed squash in a 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6) oven on a baking sheet for about 20 minutes until it starts to brown and caramelize. If you’re in a hurry or just don’t want to turn on the oven, a reader of my blog, Pressure Cooking Today, suggested browning the squash in the pressure cooker with a little butter or oil, until it gets a nice caramelized coating.

Lighter Zuppa Toscana

I based this soup on an Italian restaurant’s popular offering. This lighter pressure cooker version uses evaporated milk instead of heavy cream—without sacrificing flavor.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

6 slices bacon, diced

1 pound (454 g) ground chicken sausage

1 tablespoon (14 g) unsalted butter

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

3 cloves garlic, minced or pressed

3 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth, divided

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

3 large russet potatoes, peeled and cubed

3 tablespoons (24 g) cornstarch

1 can (12 fluid ounces, or 355 ml) evaporated milk

1 cup (80 g) shredded Parmesan cheese, divided

2 cups (60 g) fresh spinach, chopped

Select Browning/Sauté and add the bacon to the pressure cooking pot. Fry for about 5 minutes until crisp, stirring frequently. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate, leaving the bacon fat in the pot.

Add the sausage to the cooking pot. Cook for about 5 minutes until browned. Transfer to a second paper towel–lined plate.

Add the butter to the cooking pot to melt. Add the onion. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until tender. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Add 1 can (429 ml) chicken broth, the salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes. Put a steamer basket in the cooking pot. Add the potatoes. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Carefully remove the steamer basket with the potatoes from the cooking pot. Set aside. Add the remaining 2 cans (858 ml) chicken broth to the cooking pot.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch in a little evaporated milk until smooth. Add the slurry to the pot along with the remaining evaporated milk. Select Simmer/Sauté and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring often. When the soup thickens, stir in 3/4 cup (60 g) Parmesan, the spinach, browned sausage, potatoes, and half the crispy bacon. Serve topped with the remaining Parmesan and bacon.

TIP: When making soups, you don’t have to add all the broth at once. The more broth you add, the longer the soup takes to come to pressure. Adding 1 can of broth while pressure cooking, and the remaining 2 cans after pressure cooking, speeds the process and keeps ingredients such as potatoes from being overcooked.

Quick Turkey Chili

Lean ground turkey is a great alternative to ground beef, and I don’t think you’ll even miss the beef in this flavorful and quick chili.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil

11/2 pounds (680 g) ground turkey

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon (8 g) chili powder

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more for seasoning

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more for seasoning

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) diced tomatoes

1 cup (235 ml) reduced-sodium chicken broth

1 can (10 ounces, or 284 g) diced tomatoes and green chilies

2 cans (15 ounces, or 425 g, each) kidney beans, drained and rinsed

1 cup (165 g) frozen corn, thawed

2 tablespoons (14 g) all-purpose flour

Shredded cheese, diced avocado, tortilla chips, fresh cilantro, and sour cream, for serving

Select Browning/Sauté to preheat the pressure cooking pot. When hot, add the vegetable oil. When it begins to sizzle, add the turkey, onion, and garlic. Sauté for about 10 minutes until the meat is no longer pink and the onion is tender. Drain, if needed. Stir in the chili powder, cumin, salt, pepper, diced tomatoes, chicken broth, tomatoes and green chilies, and kidney beans. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir in the corn. Sprinkle the flour over the chili and stir to blend. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot topped with cheese, avocado, tortilla chips, cilantro, and sour cream, if desired.

TIP: If you’re watching your fat and cholesterol intake. Choose ground turkey made from turkey breasts—it’s leaner.

◁ Chili con Carne

This thick, hearty chili is filled with tender bite-size pieces of beef, red beans, and green chilies and thickened with crushed tortilla chips. If you’re a chili fanatic, this is a must-try recipe.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 cup (250 g) dried red kidney beans

1 quart (946 ml) water

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

2 pounds (907 g) beef chuck, trimmed and cut in to 1-inch (2.5 cm) pieces

2 to 4 tablespoons (30 to 60 ml) vegetable oil, plus more as needed

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 can (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml) reduced-sodium beef broth

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) crushed tomatoes

2 cans (4.5 ounces, or 128 g, each) mild green chilies

3 tablespoons (23 g) chili powder

2 tablespoons (32 g) tomato paste

1 teaspoon ground cumin

2/3 cup (about 20 g) finely crushed tortilla chips, plus more for serving

Shredded cheese, fresh cilantro, and sour cream, for serving

Add the beans and 1 quart (946 ml) water to the pressure cooking pot. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 1 minute cook time. When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the beans soak in the pot for 1 hour. Drain and set aside.

Season the beef generously with salt and pepper. Select Browning/Sauté and add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil and the beef in small batches. Cook each batch for about 5 minutes to brown, adding more oil as needed and transferring to a plate when done. Continue in small batches, adding more oil as needed, until all the meat is browned.

Add more oil to the cooking pot along with the onion. Sauté for about 3 minutes until tender. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute more. Stir in the beef broth, tomatoes, green chilies, chili powder, tomato paste, and cumin. Stir in the browned beef and beans. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 25 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir in the tortilla chips and let rest for 10 minutes, uncovered, to thicken. Serve topped with cheese, cilantro, sour cream, and more tortilla chips, as desired.

TIP: If you’re short on time, replace the dried kidney beans with 2 cans (15 ounces, or 425 g, each) red kidney beans, drained and rinsed. Skip the first step and add the beans with the broth.

All-American Beef Stew

A hearty all-American beef stew loaded with colorful yellow, orange, and green veggies. A perfect meal when you’re craving comfort food.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

2 pounds (907 g) beef stew meat

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil, plus more as needed

1 cup (160 g) chopped onion

2 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium beef broth

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) crushed tomatoes

2 tablespoons (3 g) dried parsley

2 bay leaves

4 russet potatoes, peeled, cubed, and cut into bite-size pieces

3 large carrots, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) pieces

1/4 cup (28 g) all-purpose flour

1/4 cup (60 ml) cold water

1 cup (165 g) frozen corn, thawed

1/2 cup (65 g) frozen peas, thawed

Season the beef generously with salt and pepper. Select Browning/Sauté and add the vegetable oil to the pressure cooking pot. When the oil begins to sizzle, brown the meat in batches for about 5 minutes per batch until all the meat is browned—do not crowd the pot. Add more oil as needed. Transfer the browned meat to a plate.

Add the onion to the cooking pot. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring frequently, until softened. Stir in the beef broth to deglaze the pot, scraping up any brown bits from the bottom of the pot. Stir in the tomatoes, parsley, bay leaves, salt and pepper, and browned beef with any accumulated juices. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 10 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Add the potatoes and carrots. Replace the lid and cook on High Pressure for 2 minutes more. When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Remove and discard the bay leaves.

In a small bowl, whisk the flour and cold water until smooth. Add 1 cup (235 ml) hot broth to the flour mixture and stir to combine. Add the slurry to the pot. Select Simmer/Sauté and bring the sauce to a boil, stirring constantly until it thickens. Stir in the corn and peas. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste.

TIP: Buying stew meat at the store saves time, but if you cut it yourself, you know what cut of beef you’re getting. Chuck roast or rump roast are the best types for stew.

Hearty Beef and Barley Soup

A robust, stick-to-your-ribs soup with fun little barley pearls.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

11/2 pounds (680 g) beef chuck, trimmed and cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) pieces

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

2 to 4 tablespoons (30 to 60 ml) vegetable oil, divided

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

2 large carrots, diced

1 cup (120 g) diced celery

2 tablespoons (32 g) tomato paste

3 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium beef broth

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) diced tomatoes

1 cup (200 g) pearl barley, rinsed and drained

1 bay leaf

1/4 cup (15 g) flat-leaf parsley leaves, finely chopped

Season the beef generously with salt and pepper. Select Browning/Sauté to preheat the pressure cooking pot. Add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil and brown the beef in batches for about 5 minutes per batch, transferring the beef to a plate when browned. Add more oil as needed.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil to the cooking pot along with the onion, carrots, and celery. Sauté for about 3 minutes until tender. Stir in the tomato paste and sauté for 1 minute more. Add the broth, tomatoes, barley, and bay leaf. Stir to combine; stir in the browned beef. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 25 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Remove and discard the bay leaf. Stir in the parsley. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste.

TIP: Pearl barley is softer and takes less time to cook then hulled barley. Because pearl barley contains fiber throughout the entire kernel and not just in the outer bran layer, it is still a good source of fiber.

Pasta Fagioli

An inexpensive yet filling soup loaded with pasta, tomatoes, vegetables, and two kinds of beans. This soup is quick and easy to make with ingredients you likely keep in your pantry.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 pound (454 g) ground beef

1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

2 large carrots, diced

1 rib celery, diced

4 cloves garlic, minced

2 cans (15 ounces, or 425 g, each) crushed tomatoes with purée

2 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth

2 cups (470 ml) water

1 cup (168 g) ditalini pasta

1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

11/2 teaspoons salt, plus more for seasoning

1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) red kidney beans, drained and rinsed

1 can (14.5 ounces, or 411 g) Great Northern beans, drained and rinsed

1/4 cup (15 g) chopped fresh parsley leaves, or 2 tablespoons (2.6 g) dried parsley

Freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning

Select Browning/Sauté. Add the ground beef to the pressure cooking pot. Sauté for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until browned and crumbled. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate. Drain any excess fat from the pot.

Add the olive oil and onion. Sauté for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the carrots, celery, and garlic. Sauté for 2 minutes more. Add the browned beef back to the cooking pot along with the tomatoes, chicken broth, water, ditalini, Italian seasoning, salt, and red pepper flakes. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir in the beans and parsley and season with salt and pepper to taste.

TIP: If you dislike the time-consuming job of mincing garlic, buy a garlic press—you don’t even have to peel the garlic when you “mince” it—just one squeeze and you’re on your way.

Minestrone Soup

A classic Italian soup loaded with veggies, beans, and pasta. This good-for-you soup is a great way to eat more veggies.

YIELD: 8 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil

1 large onion, finely chopped

2 large carrots, diced

1 rib celery, diced

1 small zucchini, chopped

4 cloves garlic, minced

3 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth, divided

2 cans (14 ounces, or 397 g, each) diced tomatoes

1 can (14 ounces, or 397 g) crushed tomatoes in purée

3/4 cup (56 g) small shell pasta

11/2 teaspoons Italian seasoning

1 teaspoon salt, plus more as needed

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed

1 can (15 ounces, or 425 g) kidney beans, drained and rinsed

1 can (15 ounces, or 425 g) white navy beans or cannellini beans, drained and rinsed

1 cup (124 g) frozen cut green beans

2 cups (60 g) fresh baby spinach

Parmesan cheese, for serving

Select Browning/Sauté and add the olive oil to the pressure cooking pot. When the oil is hot, add the onion. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onion is tender. Add the carrots, celery, zucchini, and garlic. Cook for 3 minutes more, stirring occasionally. Stir in 2 cans chicken broth, the tomatoes, pasta, Italian seasoning, salt, and pepper. Stir in the kidney beans, white beans, and green beans. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 3 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Stir in the remaining 1 can chicken broth and the spinach. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve topped with Parmesan.

TIP: Adding the third can of chicken broth after pressure cooking allows the soup to come to pressure faster, prevents overfilling the pot, and helps cool the soup so that you can eat it sooner.

Posole (Pork and Hominy Stew)

Hominy is simply dried corn kernels soaked in lime or lye until soft, swollen, and slightly chewy. If you haven’t tried hominy yet, now is the time—it’s delicious and a good source of fiber.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil, divided

1 teaspoon salt, plus more as needed

11/4 pounds (567 g) boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut into 4-inch (10 cm) pieces

1 medium-size white onion, chopped

4 cloves garlic, minced

2 tablespoons (15 g) chili powder

1 quart (940 ml) reduced-sodium chicken broth, divided

2 tablespoons (16 g) cornstarch

1/4 cup (60 ml) cold water

2 cans (29 ounces, or 822 g, each) hominy, drained and rinsed

Diced avocado and lime wedges, for serving

Select Browning/Sauté and add 1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil to the cooking pot. When the oil is hot, season the pork with salt and add it to the cooking pot. Cook for about 5 minutes until browned on all sides. Transfer to a large bowl.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon (15 ml) vegetable oil to the cooking pot. When the oil is hot, add the onion, garlic, and chili powder. Sauté for 4 minutes until soft. Stir in 2 cups (470 ml) chicken broth to deglaze the pot, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom with a wooden spoon. Add the remaining 2 cups (470 ml) chicken broth and the pork. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 30 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes and finish with a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Transfer the pork back to the large bowl and shred it using 2 forks.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Add the slurry to the pot. Select Simmer/Sauté and stir until the broth thickens. Stir in the shredded pork and hominy. Season with salt to taste. Serve with avocado and lime.

TIP: Squeeze a bit of lime juice directly on the avocado after cutting to prevent browning.

Creamy Swiss Onion Soup

Unlike traditional, long-simmered French onion soup, this creamy version comes together in no time. If you like the flavor of onion soup but aren’t crazy about the big pieces of onion left at the bottom of the bowl, this soup is for you.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

1 tablespoon (14 g) unsalted butter

1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil

3 cups (480 g) halved, thinly sliced onions

3 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

3 tablespoons (24 g) cornstarch

1 can (12 fluid ounces, or 355 ml) evaporated milk, divided

11/2 cups (165 g) shredded Swiss cheese

1 package (2.8 ounces, or 80 g) French-fried onions

Select Simmer/Sauté and melt the butter in the pressure cooking pot, then add the olive oil. When the butter melts, add the onions. Sauté for about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until tender. Stir in the chicken broth, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Use an immersion or standard blender to purée the soup until it is very smooth.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch in 1/4 cup (60 ml) evaporated milk until smooth. Add the slurry to the pot along with the remaining evaporated milk. Select Simmer/Sauté and bring the soup to a boil, stirring constantly until it thickens slightly. Add the cheese a handful at a time and stir until it melts and the soup is thick and creamy. Serve garnished with French-fried onions. Top with chives and red pepper flakes, if desired.

TIP: French-fried onions are usually found with the canned vegetables. They add a nice crisp contrast to the creamy smooth soup.

◁ Broccoli Cheese Soup

My family prefers soups with at least a little texture. So I adapted traditional creamy broccoli cheese soup by leaving pieces of broccoli and carrot in the soup, which also gives it a prettier color. You’ll also be pleased at how quick this great-tasting soup is to make and serve!

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons (28 g) unsalted butter

1 cup (160 g) diced onion

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 cans (14.5 fluid ounces, or 429 ml, each) reduced-sodium chicken broth

4 cups (284 g) bite-size broccoli florets

1 cup (110 g) matchstick carrots

1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more as needed

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed

1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1/4 cup (32 g) cornstarch

1/4 cup (60 ml) cold water

2 cups (470 ml) half-and-half

2 cups (240 g) grated Cheddar cheese

Select Browning/Sauté to preheat the pressure cooking pot. Add the butter and onion. Sauté for about 3 minutes until tender. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute more. Stir in the chicken broth, broccoli, carrots, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 1 minute cook time.

When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Select Simmer/Sauté and add the slurry to the pot, stirring constantly until the soup comes to a boil and thickens. Turn off the pressure cooker. Gradually stir in the half-and-half. Add the Cheddar a handful at a time, stirring until it melts. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

TIP: Substitute frozen chopped broccoli in this recipe, if you prefer, without changing the cook time.

 

The Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook is your resource to learning all the shortcuts on how to make a delicious dinner in a fraction of the time.

In The Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook, the world’s leading blogger on pressure cooking, Barbara Schieving (of PressureCookingToday.com), has created over 200 new family-friendly recipes that are big on flavor, imaginative in their variety, and easy to make, featuring fresh, natural, and nutritious ingredients.

The Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook features loads of tips and tricks that help you get the most from your pressure cooker, no matter what brand you own. If you’re a busy parent or can’t find time to make dinners after work, then you will love the “Shortcut Dinners” and “30-Minute Meals,” section. You’ll adore the terrific weeknight meals on the fly, and “Sunday Suppers,” is perfect for special weekend gatherings.

You’ll find recipes for every taste and diet, from robust meat and chicken dishes, to vegetarian mains and sides, plus healthy breakfasts, tasty sandwiches and tacos, soothing soups and stews, and a big chapter full of quick and easy desserts.

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