The Healthy Jewish Kitchen: Fresh, Contemporary Recipes for Every Occasion by Paula Shoyer, EPUB, 1454922907

December 14, 2017

 The Healthy Jewish Kitchen: Fresh, Contemporary Recipes for Every Occasion by Paula Shoyer, EPUB, 1454922907

The Healthy Jewish Kitchen: Fresh, Contemporary Recipes for Every Occasion by Paula Shoyer

  • Print Length: 168 Pages
  • Publisher: Sterling Epicure
  • Publication Date: November 21, 2017
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B075GC29KV
  • ISBN-10: 1454922907
  • ISBN-13: 978-1454922902
  • File Format: EPUB

 

”Preview”

STERLING EPICURE and the distinctive Sterling Epicure logo are registered trademarks of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc.

Text © 2017 Paula Shoyer

Cover and interior photography © 2017 Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., except where noted below.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (including electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without prior written permission from the publisher.

ISBN 978-1-4549-2291-9

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Names: Shoyer, Paula, author.

Title: The healthy Jewish kitchen : fresh, contemporary recipes for every occasion / Paula Shoyer, author of The New Passover Menu and The Holiday Kosher Baker.

Description: New York : Sterling Epicure, [2017] | Includes bibliographical references and index.

Identifiers: LCCN 2017007609 | ISBN 9781454922902 (book / hc-plc with jacket : alk. paper)

Subjects: LCSH: Jewish cooking. | LCGFT: Cookbooks.

Classification: LCC TX724 .S5328 2017 | DDC 641.5/676–dc23 LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2017007609

For information about custom editions, special sales, and premium and corporate purchases, please contact Sterling Special Sales at 800-805-5489 or [email protected]

sterlingpublishing.com

Design by Shannon Nicole Plunkett

Principal photography by Bill Milne. Stock photography by iStockphoto.com: 5second 93; Natasha Breen 109; Maryna Laroshenko 17; Margouillat photos 66; Merinka 49; Mizina 87; a_namenko 29; Karina Urmantseva 71, 81

Contents

A Healing Project

A Healthier Pantry

How to Use This Book

What the Labels Mean

Meal Planning

Appetizers and Salads

Soups

Meat Main Dishes

Fish, Vegetarian, and Dairy Main Dishes

Side Dishes

Desserts and Breads

About the Author

Acknowledgments

Resources

This book is dedicated to my parents, who nourished me:

Toby Marcus, z”l, 1936–2015

Reubin Marcus, z”l, 1926–2017

May their memories be a blessing.

A

Healing

Project

This is a cookbook about wellness. Writing The Healthy Jewish Kitchen was a gift to me from my publisher, and now these recipes are my gift to you.

Sterling Epicure came to me in December 2015 and asked if I would write a healthy kosher food cookbook. It was only one month after my mother, Toby Marcus, zichrona, l’vracha (may her memory be a blessing), passed away from cancer. She was diagnosed in August and was gone twelve weeks later. In December, looking ahead to 2016, I knew that I needed something to do, but I wasn’t sure what. It is hard to make decisions when you are mourning and tired all the time. All I knew for sure was that standing still was not an option. I needed a new challenge. So I chose the one handed to me. After three cookbooks, writing cookbooks is something I know how to do, and that I enjoy, so I said yes.

The healthy angle was particularly fortuitous. Shiva in the New York area left me bloated. Grieving for months meant bad weeks and worse ones. Bad weeks meant more naps and eating a lot of popcorn. Really bad weeks meant getting into my twins’ stash of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream. So when this project came along, I knew that it was time for me to eat better. We all need to.

Writing this book brought me back to life. As the months went by and I created more and more recipes that I was really excited about, I found that I felt lighter both physically and emotionally. I actually lost weight writing this book and knew I was onto something.

Most Jewish cookbooks still have too many recipes with processed ingredients, not enough whole grains, too much salt and fat, and too much sugar, even in savory dishes. My goal was to create recipes that use only natural ingredients. I banished margarine, frozen puff pastry, soup stocks and powders, and most jarred sauces (though I gave Dijon mustard a pardon). I gave up frying and created baked goods with as much whole grain flour as I could. I made recipes gluten-free where possible. I reduced sugar and salt.

These recipes include Jewish classics made healthier and updated for the modern table, and both American and international recipes that reflect food trends beyond the Jewish culinary world. This book has food you recognize, because you still want to feel connected to your ancestors’ kitchens, but I made the dishes more nutritious and, often, easier to prepare.

This book is a way for you to start eating better. I am not standing here preaching—I go to Paris and Israel and eat my way through their best restaurants and bakeries. Good nutrition is about balance and finding a way to introduce into your diet more and more healthful food as often as possible.

I learned firsthand that life is unpredictable: Right before this book went to press, I lost my father, as well. There is no guarantee that eating better will help you live longer. All I know is that now I want to feel good and have energy for the people I love. I am simply offering you a subtle shift toward better health without giving up your favorite foods. The key to better health is homemade and natural food. This is your guidebook.

–Paula

A

Healthier

Pantry

I am not a nutritionist, although I did consult with a few of them while writing this book. I listened to their suggestions and learned from them, but I was reluctant to send my audience to multiple markets to find ingredients they might never have heard of. I want people to actually make these recipes, not make their lives difficult.

Below was my thinking in using certain ingredients for this book:

SWEETENERS

I was determined not to use anything unnatural or that tasted unnatural, so I avoided all sugar substitutes. Instead, my goal was to use less than 1 cup of sugar per recipe and use honey where possible. Most of the dessert recipes have less than ½ cup sugar, but a few, try as I might, wouldn’t work any other way because of the other healthier ingredients in them.

SALT

High salt intake can increase blood pressure and put you at risk for heart attack and stroke. However, salt is an essential nutrient. Kosher food, especially in restaurants, in notoriously oversalted.

If there was one consistent complaint from my team of recipe testers, it was that the recipes all needed more salt. I was definitely conservative in adding salt. I teach teens never to add salt to a finished dish before they taste it; you should do the same. The recipes have a minimum amount of salt, and you can always add more. I found that adding just a pinch of kosher salt to dishes just before serving pumped up flavor, while using less salt overall.

Do your best to add only the amount of salt that is absolutely necessary.

OIL

There are so many different kinds of oil, and once you start using any of the oils listed below, you will be eating better than if you were still using vegetable oil, corn oil, or margarine. Each of the oils has benefits, and the best move for your overall health is to use a variety in your cooking. For this book I did not use any margarine, even the brands that are supposed to be better for your health. There are better fat choices to use that taste better.

Avocado oil: High in vitamin E, avocado oil is flavorful, especially in salads, although it is expensive.

Canola oil: Packed with omega-3s, this oil works well at high cooking temperatures. Many people avoid canola oil, however, because in the United States, most canola oil is made with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). I personally do not have a problem with that.

Coconut (oil and spread): When using these, add other flavors, such as vanilla, so that the coconut taste does not overpower the recipe, unless of course you want it to taste like coconut.

Olive oil: Olive oil lowers bad cholesterol, but avoid using it to cook food at very high temperatures, as it will burn and the health benefits of the oil will be diminished.

Sunflower oil and safflower oil: Both have a mild taste and are good for heart health.

FLOUR

We live during a time in history when the variety of flours available is truly staggering, and they have made baked goods more accessible to people on special diets. Try recipes with types of flours that are new to you and see how you feel.

White all-purpose: The nutrition community claims that white flour is evil because about 93 percent of the fiber, plus a quarter of the protein in the original wheat kernel, is removed during processing. Although the resulting flour is then fortified with vitamins, white flour is still blamed for sugar highs, energy lows, and weight gain. When I want to increase the nutritional content of a dessert, I substitute 25 percent of the white flour with another, healthier flour first. Then, after I’ve seen the results, I can see if it’s possible to substitute even more flour, as well as make other changes, such as adding additional moisture to the recipe. I use unbleached flour in my baking, to avoid the chemicals used in the bleaching process, but these recipes also work with bleached flour.

White whole-wheat: Milled from the hard, white wheat berry. The bran is lighter and sweeter than in the usual wheat berry. White whole-wheat is sometimes considered to be albino wheat. The flour has the same nutritional value as whole-wheat flour. Sometimes it makes baked goods too dry, and I find that I cannot use it alone.

Whole-wheat: I use fine rather than stone-ground whole-wheat flour.

Spelt: Spelt has fewer calories than whole-wheat flour, is higher in protein, and is easier to digest. The use of spelt goes back to the Bronze Age, and it is even mentioned in the Bible.

Almond: I use this flour a lot in my gluten-free baking and often combine it with potato starch to hold dough and batters together. I use a coffee grinder to grind whole nuts, as it is cheaper than buying almond flour and tastes fresher. Almond flour is my go-to flour substitute for Passover baking.

GRAINS

In this book I use brown rice more than white rice, but I also present a new way to prepare white rice that may be lower in calories and higher in nutrition than conventional methods. (See this page.) In addition, I have recipes that use quinoa and kasha instead of rice, and the only pasta I use is made from whole wheat. I have found that my children cannot tell that I use whole-wheat pasta rather than their beloved white pasta in baked dishes.

MILK SUBSTITUTES

I have long used soy and almond milk in my baking, and now I use coconut milk in many recipes with great results. I have yet to make a dessert recipe in which a particular milk substitute rendered an inferior result.

FAVORITE TOOLS

Scale: When I was in French culinary school, we weighed everything, including eggs. You want a scale for many reasons—to know the weight of everything from chocolate to vegetables for more accurate cooking and baking, and to divide challah dough so your strands are even (use the metric measurement for that). In the absence of weighing, you need to measure precisely. For baking, that means scooping, shaking, and leveling dry ingredients and looking at measured liquids at eye level.

Tongs: They’re the best tool for turning chicken and meat or for stirring large amounts of onions or vegetables in a tall pot. Get the silicone-tipped ones.

Box grater: This tool reminds me of my mother and grandmother, who always grated everything by hand—and using it saves you from having to clean the food processor. Recipes in this book will indicate whether to use the small or large holes of the box grater.

Microplane zester: This is a favorite tool, as I use zest in many recipes. It can also be used for grating cheese and fresh ginger. (Buy separate ones for milk and meat.)

Salad spinner: I hate wet lettuce and use a lot of fresh herbs in my recipes. The spinner helps get everything as dry as possible.

Ruler: Many dessert recipes instruct bakers to roll out dough to a certain size or to use a certain size pan. I’m good at that, simply by eyeballing things, but if you don’t have that superpower, a ruler makes sure you get it right. Hide it from the kids or you’ll never see it again.

Electric citrus juicer: I first bought one when I made lemon tarts in Geneva, Switzerland, as a caterer. The juicer gets more juice out of your citrus than juicing by hand. You can also use a manual juicer.

Food processor: There is a lot of chopping involved in this book. Be nice to your hands and use the processor sometimes.

Immersion blender: A life-changing invention. I couldn’t live without this tool, especially for soups.

Onion goggles: A favorite new toy—I mean, tool—that really prevents you from tearing up while chopping onions.

Small liquid measuring cups: These are glass or plastic, with a lip to aid pouring, and usually hold about 4 tablespoons. They are so much easier to use, without spilling, than measuring liquids with spoons.

• How to Use This Book •

Recipes in this book are labeled if they are Dairy, Meat, Parve, Vegan, Vegetarian, or Gluten-free. The Passover label indicates that the recipe is appropriate for Passover or can be adjusted easily to make it so, though I am using the Ashkenazi standard. Other gluten-free recipes with rice or legumes, but without any of the other prohibited grains, may be eaten by Sephardic Jews on Passover.

• What the Labels Mean ·

Dairy: Recipes with milk, cheese, butter, yogurt or other dairy products. You can substitute for many recipes as follows to make them nondairy:

• MILK: Soy, almond, rice, hemp

• CHEESE: Dairy-free cheeses, available in many stores, usually made from soy

• BUTTER: Coconut oil (chill or freeze for baked goods), dairy-free margarine

• YOGURT: Coconut-based yogurt

Meat: Recipes with different cuts for beef, veal, lamb, chicken

Parve: Recipes that are neither meat nor dairy and can be served with either meat or dairy meals. Eggs and fish are considered parve.

Vegan: recipes without eggs, honey, or dairy

Vegetarian: recipes without meat or fish and might contain dairy or eggs

Gluten-free: recipes without wheat (all species), barley, rye, oats (that have not been cross-contaminated)

Passover: recipes that are kosher for Passover as is, or that can easily be adapted for Passover, following Ashkenazi rules (no corn, rice, legumes)

EQUIPMENT

Every recipe has a list of equipment needed to help streamline your meal preparation, but the items are flexible. For example, if you have a 9-inch pan and the recipe calls for an 8-inch pan, you can use the pan you have, just watch the dish cooking or baking because you might need to adjust the cooking time.

TIP BOXES

Tip boxes throughout the book contain useful techniques and information also relevant to recipes elsewhere.

Most Important Tip

Every oven is different, and some run hotter or colder than others. The recipes in this book were tested on two different brands of ovens in my kitchen, then in the ovens of several recipe testers, so that I could give you the most accurate baking times. But the first time you make any recipe in this book, or really any recipe, shave 10 minutes off the baking time if the recipe calls for baking for 1 hour, shave 5 minutes off 30–60 minutes, and shave 2 minutes off 12–15 minute baking times. Check for doneness and add more time as needed; you can always add time, but you cannot take it away. More people overbake their recipes than underbake them.

Meal

Planning

Variety is the key to a delicious, nutritious meal, and the best way to convince your people to go on a healthier eating journey with you. Even my twin teenage boys discovered new foods they loved during the development of this book, and they no longer make faces when presented with a whole-grain dessert. They and their friends love to eat at our home because no meal is ever boring.

First, I make sure every dinner plate has a variety of colors and textures. Next, I make sure that we eat both raw and cooked vegetables at every meal. Not every child has to love every dish on the table, but as long as there is at least one thing each kid will eat, a meal works. There are no separate meals for different family members.

I remember being at a friend’s home at the end of the day while her nanny was cooking. I asked why she was preparing only a small amount—weren’t my friend and her husband eating with their children? She said that she would cook a separate meal later for her husband and herself. I thought she was kidding. Children are people and should just eat good food. Kid food is simply a way of dumbing down food and nutrition. Once their first two teeth came in, our children have always eaten the same meal as my husband and I.

No one loves every vegetable or every preparation of all vegetables. Figure out what works for your crew, like French daycare teachers do when introducing new foods to 18-month-old children. They try shredded raw carrots first and see if the students eat them. They might try cooked carrots next and carrot purée after that. They believe that there must be a way to get a child who says he doesn’t like carrots to eat them. Usually they find a method that appeals. American parents tend to give up when their kids try something once and claim they hate it. Keep introducing healthy foods in different forms until you get a hit. And what your child hates at age 2 might be her favorite food at age 5. At my twins’ seventeen-year-old check-up, our pediatrician turned to me with amazement and asked how I produced four good eaters; he had never seen that before in his practice. Another reason to work hard to introduce children to a wide variety is because if they develop allergies or other ailments as they grow up, they will still have many foods they like to eat.

Healthy eating requires planning and time management. Start soaking beans or rice before you go to sleep. Make sure you have all the ingredients you need several hours before you start cooking. See what takes the longest. If you have a free 15 minutes in the middle of the day, make a part of the meal—spread out the parts of a dish. My mother worked full time, so she always made Shabbat dinner on Thursday night. I almost never bake challah on Friday; challahs are done by Wednesday and are then frozen. I make desserts and soups on Thursday to make my Fridays less stressful. Not every dish should be time-consuming—create a menu that combines easy and fancy dishes. Have some soups and desserts in the freezer and build from there.

* Menu Suggestions *

SHABBAT LUNCH

Israeli Herb and Almond Salad

Chopped Salad with Lemon and Sumac Dressing

Asian Sweet Potato Salad

Winter Red Salad

Apple, Squash, and Brussels Sprout Salad

Crudités with Red Pepper Tahini

Feijoada: Brazilian Cholent with Collard Greens and Farofa

Grilled Steak with Everything Marinade

Arroz con Pollo with Brown Rice and Salsa Verde

Indian Barbecued Chicken

Kasha Mujadarra

Sri Lankan Rice with Dried Fruits and Nuts

Eggplant with Capers and Mint

Charred Cauliflower with Orange Vinaigrette

Grilled Corn with Cilantro Pesto

Whole-Wheat Onion Challah

Sourdough Challah

THANKSGIVING DINNER

Apple, Squash, and Brussels Sprout Salad

Ribollita

Sage and Shallot Roasted Turkey with Whole-Wheat Stuffing

Grilled Corn with Cilantro Pesto

Tzimmis Purée

Fruit Galette with a Chocolate Crust

Rosemary Focaccia

ROSH HASHANAH

Tuscan Farro Soup

Brisket Bourguignon

Whole Roasted Chicken with Quinoa and Pine Nut Stuffing

Sri Lankan Rice with Dried Fruits and Nuts

Tzimmis Purée

Roasted Broccoli with Mustard and Za’atar Drizzle

Caramelized Apple Strudel

Israeli Chocolate Rugelach

Root Vegetable and Apple Cake

Blueberry Honey Cake Scones

CHANUKAH

Potato and Scallion Latkes with Pickled Applesauce

PURIM

Pumpkin Hamantaschen

PASSOVER

Israeli Herb Salad

Chopped Salad with Lemon Sumac Dressing

Winter Red Salad

Apple, Squash, and Brussels Sprout Salad

Mango Coleslaw

Watermelon, Peach, and Mint Gazpacho

Bouillabaisse

Modern Borscht: Beet and Parsnip Purée

Tzatziki Soup

French Onion Soup with Flanken

Baked Schnitzel with Nut Crust

Brisket Bourguignon

Indian Barbecued Chicken

Whole Roasted Chicken with Quinoa and Pine Nut Stuffing

Coq au Vin Blanc

Red Quinoa Meatballs with Spaghetti Squash

Dry-Rubbed Roasted Salmon

Spiced Fish with Cauliflower Purée and Red Pepper Tomato Relish

Quinoa with Mushrooms and Kale

Potato and Scallion Latkes with Pickled Applesauce

Brussels Sprout Crumbs

Tzimmis Purée

Eggplant with Capers and Mint

Chocolate Quinoa Cake

SHAVUOT

Tzatziki Soup

Watermelon, Peach, and Mint Gazpacho

Bouillabaisse

Cheese-Filled Buckwheat Blintzes

Fish Tacos with Cilantro Lime Rice

Dry-Rubbed Roasted Salmon

Pasta Siciliana

Mini Cheesecakes with Oat and Brown Sugar Crust and Strawberry Purée

BBQ

Watermelon, Peach, and Mint Gazpacho

Charred Cauliflower with Orange Vinaigrette

Asian Sweet Potato Salad

Mango Coleslaw

Grilled Steak with Everything Marinade

Indian Barbecued Chicken

Japanese Lamb Chops

Peas and Carrots Reinvented: Grilled Whole Carrots with English Pea Dip

Grilled Corn with Cilantro Pesto

Fruit Cobbler with Chickpea and Almond Topping

Appetizers

and

Salads

Israeli Herb and Almond Salad

Chopped Salad with Lemon and Sumac Dressing

Crudités with Red Pepper Tahini

Mango Coleslaw

Apple, Squash, and Brussels Sprout Salad

Tuna Poke

Asian Sweet Potato Salad

Winter Red Salad

Cambodian Spring Rolls with Lime, Chili, and Peanut Dipping Sauce

Sylvia’s Turkey Stuffed Cabbage

Salmon and Avocado Tartare

ISRAELI HERB AND ALMOND SALAD

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan, Passover • Serves 6

This versatile salad, which appears in some version on every Israeli hotel breakfast buffet, can be served with yogurt or eggs for breakfast and alongside any grilled fish, chicken, or steak dish for lunch or dinner. I’ve even served this salad with gefilte fish. To make a meal of the salad, you can add feta, chickpeas (but not on Passover), or tuna. Always use the freshest herbs you can find, and wash and dry them very well.

PREP TIME: 20 minutes • COOK TIME: 15 minutes to toast almonds • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, chef’s knife, salad spinner, citrus juicer, garlic press, jelly roll pan or cookie sheet, food processor, measuring cups and spoons, paper towels, large bowl, small bowl, whisk, tongs

¹⁄³ cup (40g) slivered almonds

2 large bunches Italian parsley, thick stems removed

1 large bunch dill, stems removed

1 cup (50g) mint leaves

4 scallions, ends trimmed, thinly sliced

¼ cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil

Juice of 1 lemon (about 3½ tablespoons)

1 clove garlic, crushed

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper, or more to taste

1 pint (300g) cherry tomatoes, halved if small or quartered if large

• Preheat oven to 325°F (160°C). Place the almonds on a cookie sheet and toast for 12 to 15 minutes, or until light golden and fragrant. Shake the pan once during baking. Set aside and let cool.

• Wash the herbs in batches in a salad spinner and dry very well. Chop the parsley (about 2½ cups [125g]), dill (about 2 cups [100g]), and mint by hand or in a food processor into small, but not tiny, pieces. Even after the herbs are chopped, I grab more paper towels to press into them to absorb more moisture. Place with the scallions in a large bowl.

• In a small bowl, place the olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper and whisk well. Add to the herbs and toss to coat. Add the tomatoes and mix. Taste and add more salt and pepper if needed. Add the almonds right before serving and toss well.

Washing and Drying Fresh Herbs

Fill a salad spinner or bowl with cold water. Submerge the herbs and move them around to loosen any dirt. Lift the strainer part of the spinner out of the water. If the water is clean, the herbs are clean. If the water is dirty, dump the water out, rinse the bowl, refill it, and repeat until the water is clean. Spin to get as much water as possible off the herbs, and then use paper towels to dry them even more.

Storing Fresh Herbs

Rosemary, sage, and thyme should be wrapped in a damp paper towel and stored in a plastic bag in the fridge. Herbs such as parsley, dill, mint, tarragon, and cilantro should be stored in the fridge with the stems placed in a jar with water, like a bouquet of flowers, and then covered loosely with a plastic bag. Basil should be stored at room temperature in water away from direct sunlight.

CHOPPED SALAD WITH LEMON AND SUMAC DRESSING

Dairy (if using cheese), Parve and Vegan (if not using cheese), Gluten-free, Passover • Serves 6 to 8

Anyone who has heard my four secrets to staying fit as a chef will already know that I eat a lot of salad. If you grew up in the era when iceberg lettuce and salads composed of fewer than five ingredients were popular, you’ll love this modern chopped salad. There is no wrong way to make a salad—you can add other ingredients to this recipe, such as tuna, hard-boiled eggs, chickpeas, cannellini beans, or any vegetable you like to eat raw.

PREP TIME: 15 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: Dressing may be made 3 days in advance; assemble salad right before serving; best eaten day of preparation • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, measuring cups and spoons, citrus juicer, garlic press, large bowl, small bowl or glass measuring cup, whisk, tongs

SALAD

2 scallions, ends trimmed, cut into ¼-inch (12-mm) pieces

½ red bell pepper, cut into ¾-inch (2-cm) pieces

8 pitted green olives, halved the long way

½ small red onion, chopped into ¼-inch (6-mm) pieces (about ¼ cup)

½ English cucumber, unpeeled, cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces

1 endive, halved the long way and sliced

½ fennel bulb, chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

1 avocado, cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) cubes

1 cup (20g) baby spinach leaves, roughly chopped

2 cups (40g) arugula leaves, or any type of lettuce, cut into 1 to 1½-inch (2.5- to 4-cm) pieces

1 cup (150g) multicolored cherry tomatoes, halved

½ cup (75g) cubed feta cheese, cut into ¾- to 1-inch (2-cm to 2.5-cm) cubes (optional)

DRESSING

Juice of ½ lemon, or more to taste

4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

½ teaspoon sumac

1 clove garlic, crushed

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

Pinch kosher salt, if needed after tasting

• To make the salad, put the scallions, bell peppers, olives, red onions, cucumbers, endive, fennel, avocadoes, spinach, arugula, and cherry tomatoes into a large bowl.

• To make the dressing, place the lemon juice, olive oil, sumac, garlic, salt, and pepper in a small bowl or glass measuring cup and whisk well. Pour the dressing over the vegetables and toss. Taste the salad. Sprinkle kosher salt on top, if needed, and toss before serving.

• Scatter feta cheese on top, if using.

Sumac

Sumac is a flowering plant grown in Africa, North America, and East Asia that produces red berries that are dried and ground. In Middle Eastern cooking it is used as a garnish to salads, while Iranians add it to meat kebabs and rice. Throughout history sumac has also been used as medicine or as a dye.

CRUDITÉS WITH RED PEPPER TAHINI

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan • Serves 6, or more as a nosh before dinner

This red pepper tahini can be served with anything—schnitzel, grilled meat, or fish—or use it as a dip for bread.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes; 15 minutes to let peppers cool • COOK TIME: 10 to 15 minutes to roast peppers • ADVANCE PREP: Tahini may be made 4 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, measuring cups and spoons, citrus juicer, jelly roll pan or cookie sheet, medium bowl, plastic wrap, food processor, silicone spatula, small bowl

2 red bell peppers, halved, seeds and white veins removed

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling on peppers

⅛ teaspoon smoked paprika

¼ cup (60ml) tahini

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

⅛ teaspoon salt

1½ cups (225g) baby carrots

4 stalks celery, cut into sticks

1 yellow or orange bell pepper, cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) strips, seeds and white veins removed

3 Persian cucumbers, cut into sticks

• Preheat oven to broil. Place the red bell peppers on a cookie sheet, drizzle with the olive oil, and rub to coat. Roast for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the peppers are blackened. Remove the peppers from the oven and place into a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let sit for 15 minutes, or until the peppers are cool and you have time to peel them.

• Peel off the blackened skin and discard it. Place the broiled peppers in a food processor. Add the olive oil, smoked paprika, tahini, lemon juice, and salt, and process until puréed. Serve in a bowl next to the vegetables.

MANGO COLESLAW

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan, Passover • Serves 8

This recipe uses three types of cabbage, but you can also substitute with arugula, slivered spinach leaves, or sliced fennel, or add half a shredded carrot for more color, if you like. The dressing can be used on any salad. Serve this coleslaw with Fish Tacos with Cilantro Lime Rice, the Grilled Steak with Everything Marinade, or the Baked Schnitzel with Nut Crust.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: Dressing may be made 2 days in advance; salad may be made 1 day in advance • EQUIPMENT: Vegetable peeler, cutting board, knife, measuring cups and spoons, citrus juicer, food processor, large bowl, tongs to toss the salad

DRESSING

1 large ripe mango, peeled and cut into 1- to 2-inch pieces

2 tablespoons finely chopped red onion

Juice of 1 lime, about 2 to 3 tablespoons

1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

2 tablespoons avocado, sunflower, or safflower oil

½ cup (20g) loosely packed cilantro leaves

1 teaspoon honey

½ large green chili pepper, such as jalapeño

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

SALAD

2 cups (200g) shredded red cabbage, about ½ small head

2 cups (200g) shredded green cabbage, about ½ small head

2 cups (200g) shredded Napa cabbage, about 1/3 head

4 scallions, ends trimmed, sliced

• To make the dressing, place the mango, red onions, lime juice, vinegar, oil, cilantro, honey, chili pepper, salt, and black pepper into the bowl of a food processor. Process until puréed; it will be a yellow sauce with green specks.

• To make the salad, in a large bowl, place the shredded cabbages and scallions and toss. Add the mango dressing and mix well.

Chopping Onions

Trim the ends off the onion and cut it in half the long way. Peel off the skin. Place one half, cut side down, on a cutting board, with one end facing toward the tip of your knife. With your knife, cut slices into the onion lengthwise, in the width that you want, but do not slice all the way through the onion; keeping the onion partially intact on one end gives you stability in cutting. Make perpendicular cuts across the long slices all the way until your first cuts end. Turn the small piece of the onion around and then cut slices into that piece. Slice across that slice.

APPLE, SQUASH, AND BRUSSELS SPROUT SALAD

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan, Passover (substitute for the rice vinegar) • Serves 6

This is a great salad or side dish to serve in the fall—perfect for Thanksgiving dinner or Sukkot lunch.

PREP TIME: 15 minutes • COOK TIME: 30 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 2 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, measuring cups and spoons, garlic press, jelly roll or roasting pan, silicone spatula, fork, large bowl, small bowl, whisk

1½ pounds (700g) Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved

3 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons avocado, sunflower, or safflower oil, divided

3 cups butternut squash, cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) cubes

3 tablespoons maple syrup

3 cloves garlic, crushed

1 tablespoon rice vinegar

¼ teaspoon allspice

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 tablespoon water

1 red apple, unpeeled, chopped into ¾-inch (2-cm) pieces

¼ teaspoon salt, or more to taste

¼ teaspoon black pepper

• Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Place the prepared Brussels sprouts on one side of a jelly roll or roasting pan and toss with 1 tablespoon of oil. Place the butternut squash cubes on the other side of the pan and toss with 2 teaspoons oil. Roast for 30 minutes, or until fork-tender. Let vegetables cool.

• Place the roasted vegetables into a large serving bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together the remaining 2 tablespoons oil and the maple syrup, garlic, rice vinegar, allspice, cinnamon, and water. Pour over the vegetables and toss well. Add the apple pieces and toss again. Add salt and pepper. Serve at room temperature.

Cleaning Brussels Sprouts

You should follow your own rabbinic authority for instructions for cleaning and inspecting Brussels sprouts. I trim off the ends and then remove and discard two layers of outer leaves. I then rinse the sprouts. To be extra careful to avoid bugs, after chopping the sprouts, soak them in water, drain them, and check the water to see if any dirt or bugs are present, and then repeat the process. Dry the sprouts well before proceeding with a recipe.

TUNA POKE

Parve, Gluten-free, Fish • Serves 6

When our family went to Hawaii to celebrate my fiftieth birthday, we pretty much lived on tuna poke (pronounced “POE-kay”), made a variety of ways. Poke is the Hawaiian version of tuna tartare, raw tuna mixed with different spices and sauces. When we were traveling to the town of Volcano on the Big Island, I read about a supermarket that sold poke from the deli counter. Although I was skeptical about buying raw fish from a huge grocery store, I bought two different flavors, along with a bag of taro chips. We ate up the poke immediately, and when we passed the store again, on our departure, we went inside to buy more. Sushi-grade tuna is pricey, so check with your local fish store to find out when they get their tuna, and plan to make this recipe when it is freshest. You can also buy tuna sashimi from a sushi restaurant and use it to make poke.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: Must be made and served on the same day • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, measuring cups and spoons, whisk, silicone spatula, kitchen scissors

1½ pounds (680g) fresh sushi-grade tuna, cut into ¾-inch (2-cm) cubes

¹⁄³ cup (35g) finely chopped red onion

3 tablespoons chopped chives, about ¹⁄³-inch (8-mm) pieces

5 tablespoons tamari soy sauce

3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 sheet dried seaweed

• Place the tuna into a large bowl. Add the onions, chives, tamari, and sesame oil and mix well. Use kitchen scissors to cut the seaweed into thin, 1-inch (2.5-cm) strips and add them to the bowl. Serve immediately with taro chips, crackers, toasted bread.

Favorite Tools—Kitchen Scissors

I am a huge fan of high-quality kitchen scissors, which you must hide from your school-age children, who will want to use them for arts-and-crafts projects. I use mine to cut whole chickens, short ribs, and other types of meat into pieces, as well as to chop chives, slice basil and other herbs, and cut parchment to fit pans—and the list of uses goes on and on.

ASIAN SWEET POTATO SALAD

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan • Serves 6 to 8

When I was growing up, deli sandwiches or hot dogs were always served with a creamy, mayonnaise-

covered potato salad. My grandmother Sylvia’s version had lots of onions and white vinegar, which gave her salad a sharp taste. I wanted to offer up a new potato salad, this time with sweet potatoes and without mayonnaise, but still creamy.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes • COOK TIME: 15 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 2 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Vegetable peeler, cutting board, knife, 2-cup (480-ml) glass measuring cup, measuring cups and spoons, medium saucepan, fork, whisk, silicone spatula, medium bowl

2 pounds (1 kg) sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 3-inch (7.5-cm) chunks

¼ cup (60g) natural, smooth peanut butter

¼ cup (60ml) boiling water

1 tablespoon tamari soy sauce

2 teaspoons sesame oil

1 teaspoon honey

¼ teaspoon rice vinegar

2 tablespoons chopped cilantro

2 pinches cayenne pepper

2 scallions, ends trimmed, sliced

Black sesame seeds (optional)

2 tablespoons chopped roasted peanuts (optional)

• In a medium saucepan, bring 8 cups (2L) water to a boil over medium heat. Add the sweet potato chunks and cook until barely fork-tender, about 15 minutes. Be careful not to overcook. Drain and let cool completely.

• Meanwhile, prepare the dressing. Measure the peanut butter in a 2-cup (500-ml) glass measuring cup. Add the boiling water, and stir or whisk to dissolve the peanut butter in the water. Add the tamari, sesame oil, honey, rice vinegar, cilantro, and cayenne pepper. Whisk well.

• When the sweet potatoes are cool, cut them into 1-inch (2.5-cm) cubes and place them in a medium serving bowl. Add the dressing and mix gently. Sprinkle the scallions and sesame seeds or chopped peanuts on top, if you like, and serve.

WINTER RED SALAD

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan, Passover • Serves 6

This salad gives a blast of vivid color and crunch to an otherwise not very colorful main course such as simple chicken or fish. Feel free to use precooked beets, which can now be found in most supermarkets.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes • COOK TIME: 45 minutes to roast beets • ADVANCE PREP: Beets may be made 3 days in advance and stored in the fridge; dressing may be made 3 days in advance; salad may be assembled 1 day in advance • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, measuring cups and spoons, vegetable peeler, Microplane zester, citrus juicer, aluminum foil, jelly roll or roasting pan, whisk, silicone spatula, tongs

SALAD

3 medium red beets, greens trimmed off, unpeeled

2 cups (200g) shredded red cabbage, about half a large head

1 small head radicchio, cut into 1½-inch (4-cm) pieces, about 2½ cups (500g) sliced

½ small red onion, halved and very thinly sliced

2 radishes, peeled into thin slices with a vegetable peeler

½ cup (70g) dried cranberries

¼ cup (40g) pomegranate seeds (optional)

DRESSING

1 teaspoon orange zest (from 1 orange)

1 tablespoon fresh orange juice, from zested orange

1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots (1 small or ½ large bulb)

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon water

1 teaspoon honey

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

¼ teaspoon salt, or more to taste

¼ teaspoon black pepper, or more to taste

• Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Rinse, dry, and then wrap each beet in aluminum foil. Place the beets on a jelly roll pan and bake for 45 minutes, or until you can pierce the center with a fork. Remove the beets from the oven and peel them when they are cool enough to handle. May be made 3 days in advance and stored in the fridge.

• To make the dressing, place the orange zest in a medium bowl with the orange juice, shallots, vinegar, water, honey, olive oil, salt, and pepper and whisk well. Dressing may be made 3 days in advance.

• To assemble the salad, place the cabbage, radicchio, red onions, radishes, and cranberries into a large bowl. Cut the beets into 1-inch (2.5-cm) cubes or wedges and add to the bowl. Whisk the dressing and pour over the salad. Toss well. Taste and add salt and pepper if needed, and serve. Sprinkle pomegranate seeds on top, if desired.

CAMBODIAN SPRING ROLLS WITH LIME, CHILI, AND PEANUT DIPPING SAUCE

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan • Serves 6

In December 2014, my family took a trip to Vietnam and Cambodia. In Siem Riep, Cambodia, we went to the Peace Café, a vegetarian restaurant that came highly recommended. We took a family cooking class in a hut that we climbed up a ladder to enter, and we made these fresh spring rolls. If you like, you can also add leftover salmon or cooked soup chicken (see this page) to the filling.

PREP TIME: 20 minutes • COOK TIME: 3 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: Sauce may be made 3 days in advance; spring rolls are best served the day they are made • EQUIPMENT: Citrus juicer, measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, vegetable peeler, box grater, small saucepan, whisk, small bowl, pie plate or roasting pan, parchment, plate

DIPPING SAUCE

½ cup (120ml) water

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

1 tablespoon coconut sugar

¼ to ½ teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste

2 tablespoons natural, crunchy peanut butter

SPRING ROLLS

12 round rice paper wrappers

12 Bibb lettuce leaves or 6 Romaine lettuce leaves, vein cut out and cut into large pieces

12 large basil leaves

1 cup (50g) mint leaves (2 to 3 leaves per spring roll)

²⁄³ English cucumber, cut into sticks about 3 inches (7.5cm) long and ½ inch (12mm) wide

2 carrots, peeled and grated on the large holes of a box grater, about 2 cups (220g)

• To make the dipping sauce, place the water, lime juice, coconut sugar, and red pepper flakes into a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring the sauce to a boil and then cook it for 3 minutes over low heat. Remove the saucepan from the heat, whisk in the peanut butter, and transfer the sauce to a small bowl. May be made 3 days in advance.

• To make the spring rolls, have all filling ingredients ready. Fill a pie plate or 9 x 13-inch (23 x 33-cm) pan with about an inch (2.5cm) of water. Place a piece of parchment paper in front of you. Take each rice paper wrapper and dip it into the water, submerging it completely for 20 seconds. Place the softened wrapper on top of the parchment. Place the lettuce leaf just below the middle of the wrapper. Place a basil leaf, 2 to 3 mint leaves, 2 cucumber sticks, and some shredded carrots, about 2½ tablespoons, on top.

• Fold the top of the wrapper up over the filling and squeeze tightly. Roll it over again. Fold the sides of the wrapper toward the middle and then roll it up. Place the roll on a plate. When all the rolls have been made, slice each one in half by cutting it diagonally across the middle.

• Serve the rolls with the dipping sauce.

SYLVIA’S TURKEY STUFFED CABBAGE

Meat, Gluten-free • Serves 6 to 8

I have written stories about my grandma Sylvia Altman in all my cookbooks, because she was the person who first inspired me to bake and challenge myself in the kitchen. Her stuffed cabbage was legendary. She came to Washington, D.C., when she was probably 88 years old, and we cooked it together, with me furiously trying to write down amounts and instructions as she measured with her hands. Grandma’s version is made with beef and white rice, and she would use four different saucepans to make the dish. I lightened up both the recipe and the amount of cleanup required. She also used round green cabbage, but I have found that Napa leaves are easier to roll up. This dish tastes better with each passing day.

PREP TIME: 20 minutes • COOK TIME: 3 hours • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, vegetable peeler, cutting board, knife, can opener, citrus juicer, medium or large saucepan, large colander, large bowl, tongs, paper towels, Dutch oven or other large saucepan, silicone spatula

CABBAGE ROLLS

1 head Napa cabbage, bottom trimmed off

1 medium onion

1 pound (450g) ground turkey, dark meat if possible

¹⁄³ cup (65g) brown rice

1 large egg

¼ cup (60ml) water

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

¼ cup (40g) golden raisins

TOMATO SAUCE

1 tablespoon sunflower, safflower, or other mild oil

2 medium onions

1 large green apple, peeled and cut into ¾-inch (2-cm) cubes

1 28-ounce (795-g) can crushed tomatoes

Juice of 1½ lemons, about 4 tablespoons

¼ cup (55g) light brown sugar

1 tablespoon honey

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

• Cut off the end of the cabbage and separate 15 leaves. Bring a medium or large saucepan of water to a boil. Place a colander over a bowl near the saucepan. Cook the leaves, about 5 at a time, for 4 minutes per batch, leaving the water boiling the entire time. Use tongs to lift the cooked leaves out of the saucepan, one at a time, and place in the colander to drain. Try not to tear the leaves. Rinse the cooked leaves under cold water and then place them on paper towels to dry.

• To make the tomato sauce, in a large saucepan or Dutch oven, heat the oil over medium heat. Chop 2 of the onions into small dice, about ½-inch (12-mm) pieces, and add them to a large saucepan or Dutch oven along with the apple cubes. Cook the mixture, stirring it occasionally, until the onions start to soften but not brown, about 10 minutes. Add the crushed tomatoes and then fill the can halfway with water (a little less than 2 cups [480ml]) and add it to the saucepan. Add the lemon juice, brown sugar, and honey and bring to a boil. Add the salt and pepper and simmer, covered.

• To make the filling, finely chop the remaining onion either by hand or in a food processor. Place it in a large bowl. Add the ground turkey, rice, egg, water, salt, and pepper, and mix well with your hands. Scoop up a handful of the mixture, about 2 to 3 tablespoons for each roll, and place it in the bottom of a cabbage leaf, at the stem. Fan out the cabbage leaf.

• Fold the bottom of the cabbage leaf over the mixture and roll it over again, then fold the sides of the leaf toward the middle to cover the meat, and then roll it up. When all the rolls are ready, place them in the tomato sauce and sprinkle the raisins all around. Cook the rolls, covered over low heat, for 3 hours, carefully stirring the bottom one or twice with a silicone spatula to prevent sticking.

Buffets are Usually the Way to Go

I am a huge fan of serving the main course as a buffet for several reasons. First, I can keep food hotter longer because I can place on the buffet table a baking dish that would be too hot to hold and pass. Second, by not transferring everything into smaller serving dishes to be passed around, I have less cleanup afterward. Third, when bowls and platters are on the table, I will keep adding more food to my plate; if food is on the buffet, I will think twice before getting up to take more, so I eat less. Finally, happy, chatty people pass food very, very slowly, so by the time the serving bowl is passed to you, the food inside it will be cold.

SALMON AND AVOCADO TARTARE

Parve, Gluten-free, Fish, Passover • Serves 8 (¹⁄³-cup servings)

Tartare is the French version of poke, ceviche, and sashimi. I was working on a gefilte fish recipe when I got a call from my friend Chana Kaplan, who runs Friendship Circle at Chabad in Potomac, Maryland. I told her that I was agonizing over a gefilte fish recipe idea that just wasn’t panning out. When Chana said that there were enough gefilte fish recipes out there in the world, I mentioned an idea for salmon tartare as a lighter alternative. Chana convinced me to abandon my plan to include a gefilte fish recipe in this book. This tartare is infinitely easier to prepare and can be doubled and tripled for a crowd.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: Must be made and served on the same day • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, Microplane zester, citrus juicer, measuring cups and spoons, kitchen scissors, large bowl, silicone spatula

1 pound (450g) of the freshest salmon or sashimi you can buy

3 scallions, ends trimmed, sliced

1 radish, finely chopped

Zest of ½ lime

1 teaspoon lime juice, from zested lime

1 tablespoon avocado oil

1 ripe avocado, cut into ½-inch (12-mm) cubes

1 basil leaf, cut into ribbons, about 1 tablespoon

1 or 2 tablespoons micro greens, for garnish (optional)

• Slice the salmon into ½-inch (12-mm) cubes. Place them in a large bowl. Add the scallions, radishes, and lime zest and mix. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until just before serving.

• When you’re ready to serve the tartare, add the lime juice, avocado oil, avocado cubes, and basil and mix well. Garnish with a sprinkle of micro greens, if you like.

Soups

Cream of Broccoli Soup

Ribollita

Black Bean Soup

Moroccan Lentil Soup

Modern Borscht: Beet and Parsnip Purée

Split Pea Soup with Barley and Pink Beans

Vietnamese Chicken Noodle Soup

Tuscan Farro Soup

Bouillabaisse

French Onion Soup with Flanken

Tzatziki Soup

Watermelon, Peach, and Mint Gazpacho

CREAM OF BROCCOLI SOUP

Gluten-free, Vegan, Passover • Serves 8 to 10

I started making vegetable purée soups back when I was practicing law many years ago. I would cook soups at home, take them into work, and then reheat and eat them at my desk so that I could get right back to work. Soup is definitely the hardest category of recipe writing for me, because I simply never measure anything when I make soup. Most of my vegetable soups are made with whatever I happen to find in the fridge. So feel free to substitute the broccoli in this recipe with 2 pounds (1kg) of any vegetable (or vegetables) you already have, and use this base recipe to clean out your fridge, like I do. See tip box below.

PREP TIME: 8 minutes • COOK TIME: 30 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, garlic press, can opener, large saucepan or soup pot, silicone spatula, fork, immersion blender or food processor

¼ cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil

2 medium onions, halved and sliced

2 stalks celery, chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger

2 pounds (1kg) broccoli

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

¼ teaspoon plus ⅛ teaspoon white pepper, divided

¼ teaspoon ground coriander

4 cloves garlic, crushed and divided

6 cups (1.4L) water

½ teaspoon salt, divided

1 cup (40g) packed large basil leaves, almost 1 large bunch (reserve some leaves, for garnish)

½ cup (120ml) canned coconut milk

Kosher salt to taste

• Pour the oil into a large saucepan or soup pot over medium heat. Add the onions, celery, and ginger and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. While the onions are cooking, cut the crowns off the top of the broccoli (the greenest parts), and measure 1½ cups (135g) of crowns. (If you like, reserve a few broccoli florets to garnish the soup before serving.) Set them aside and cut up the remaining broccoli into 2-inch (5-cm) pieces.

• Add the turmeric, ¼ teaspoon white pepper, ground coriander, large pieces of broccoli, 2 cloves crushed garlic, water, and ¼ teaspoon salt, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low, and cook the mixture for 20 minutes, or until the broccoli is fork-tender. Turn off the heat.

• Add the broccoli crowns, remaining 2 cloves crushed garlic, basil, remaining ¼ teaspoon salt, and remaining ∕₈ teaspoon white pepper, then cover and let sit for 10 minutes. Use an immersion blender to purée or use a food processor to blend the mixture in batches, for 3 whole minutes each, until it is very smooth. Add the coconut milk and a little kosher salt to taste and purée for another minute.

Repurposing Vegetables

After sitting shiva for both my parents within a year and a half of each another, I discovered that I could turn any leftover crudite platter or roasted vegetable side into a tasty soup.

RIBOLLITA

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan • Serves 8 to 10

This Italian classic is usually made with stale bread. I’ve found that it is really filling, however—a complete meal for lunch—without the bread. If you like, serve the soup with toasted slices of whole-wheat Rosemary Focaccia on the side. You can also use curly kale for this recipe, but lacinato is heartier and looks particularly nice in the soup.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes • COOK TIME: 50 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, vegetable peeler, can opener, large saucepan or soup pot, colander, food processor, fork

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 large onion, halved and chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

2 leeks, light green and white parts only, quartered and sliced

2 carrots, peeled and sliced

2 stalks celery, chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

2 15.5-ounce (440-g) cans cannellini beans, divided

7 cups water (1.7L), divided

3 tomatoes, seeds removed, cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces

1 zucchini, chopped into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces

1 cup butternut squash cubes, cut into ¾- to 1-inch (2- to 2.5-cm) cubes

10 leaves lacinato kale (the variety with large bumpy-looking leaves), cut into 1½-inch (4-cm) pieces, about 1½ to 2 cups

Leaves from 6 sprigs fresh thyme

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

1 large potato, peeled, and cut into ¾- to 1-inch (2- to 2.5-cm) cubes

½ cup (20g) basil leaves, thinly sliced, as garnish

• Heat the oil in a large saucepan or soup pot over medium-low heat. Add the onions, leeks, carrots, celery, and garlic and cook for 10 minutes. Stir occasionally. If the vegetables start to brown, turn down the heat.

• Meanwhile, drain one can of the beans and rinse them well. Transfer the beans to the bowl of a food processor. Add 1 cup (240ml) of water to the bowl and purée until the mixture is completely smooth. Set it aside.

• Add the tomatoes to the saucepan and turn the heat up to medium. Cook for 8 minutes, stirring often. Add the zucchini, squash, kale, and thyme and cook for 5 minutes over medium-low heat. Add the salt and pepper, remaining 6 cups water, bean purée, and potatoes. Bring to a boil, add the second can of drained beans, and then simmer the soup on low heat, covered, for 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the squash and potatoes are barely fork-tender.

• Adjust seasonings if needed, add fresh basil, and serve.

Cleaning Leeks

Trim the end off the white part, cut off the dark green part, and discard both. Slice the leek lengthwise and discard the two outermost layers. Slice through another layer or two, open them, and rinse off, checking for sand. If you find any, cut into the next layer and rinse it well. Continue until no sand remains.

BLACK BEAN SOUP

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan • Serves 8 to 10

Black beans are considered one of the healthiest foods you can eat. Feel free to add any other chopped raw vegetable, corn kernels, or even whole black beans to the garnish. Since this is a puréed soup, you don’t need to bother with cutting the vegetables into very small pieces.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes • COOK TIME: 40 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, vegetable peeler, can opener, colander, large saucepan or soup pot, silicone spatula, food processor, ladle

SOUP

3 tablespoons sunflower, safflower, or canola oil

2 large onions, halved and sliced

4 stalks celery, roughly chopped

3 carrots, peeled and chopped into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces

½ jalapeño pepper, seeded and sliced

5 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves

1 teaspoon garlic powder

¾ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon chili powder

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

2 large tomatoes, seeded and chopped

½ cup (20g) cilantro leaves

1 26.5-ounce (750-g) can plus one 15.5-ounce (440-g) can black beans, drained and rinsed

5 cups (1.2L) water, or more, if soup becomes too thick

GARNISH

3 scallions, ends trimmed, thinly sliced

½ red bell pepper, finely chopped into ¼-inch (6-mm) cubes

½ yellow bell pepper, finely chopped into ¼-inch (6-mm) cubes

16 cherry tomatoes, quartered

1 avocado, cubed

Handful cilantro leaves

• Heat the oil in a large saucepan or soup pot over medium heat. Add the onions, celery, carrots, jalapeños, and garlic and cook for 10 minutes, until onions are clear. Stir occasionally. Add the thyme, garlic powder, cumin, chili powder, salt, and black pepper, and cook for another 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and cilantro leaves, raise the heat to medium-high, and stir. Add beans and water.

• Bring the mixture to a boil, reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Let cool for 10 minutes. Using an immersion blender or a food processor, purée the mixture for 5 full minutes. If you’re using a food processor, purée the mixture in batches.

• To serve the soup, ladle it into bowls and pass around the garnishes in separate bowls.

Canned versus Dried Beans

Canned and dried beans have the same nutritional value, though some brands add salt, so look for brands that are sodium-free. People use canned beans for convenience because they cook faster, but canned beans cost more. If you are using dried beans in a recipe that calls for canned beans, you will need to cook the beans separately until they are edible and no longer hard. After the beans have soaked overnight, drain, rinse, and then place into a saucepan and cover with water about 2 inches above the beans. Cook for 40 to 90 minutes, until soft. Skim off any dirty foam that rises to the top. You can cool and then freeze the cooked beans to use later.

MOROCCAN LENTIL SOUP

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan • Serves 10

When I do cooking demonstrations around the world, I often try to connect food or desserts to that week’s parashah, the weekly Torah portion that is read in synagogue. Some weeks are easy, such as when Abraham tells Sarah to “make haste” and prepare foods for the three angels, but other passages are impossible to connect to what I am teaching. This, however, is the soup you should make when the parashah is Toldot, which tells the story of how Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for a bowl of lentil soup.

PREP TIME: Lentils soak 6 hours to overnight; 8 minutes • COOK TIME: 55 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, vegetable peeler, garlic press, large bowl, colander, large saucepan or soup pot, immersion blender

1 pound (450g) dried lentils, soaked in water to cover for 6 hours or overnight, and then drained

¼ cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil

1 large onion, chopped into ¼- to ½-inch (6- to 12-mm) pieces

1 large or 2 small leeks, white and light green parts only, quartered the long way and sliced (see Tip)

2 stalks celery, cut into ¼- to ½-inch (6- to 12-mm) pieces

2 carrots, peeled and cut into ¼- to ½-inch (6- to 12-mm) pieces

4 cloves garlic, crushed

1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper, divided

8 cups (2L) water

• In a large bowl, cover the lentils with water and cover for 6 hours or overnight. Drain the lentils and set aside.

• In a large saucepan or soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onions, leeks, celery, carrots, and garlic and cook until the vegetables soften, about 10 minutes, stirring often. Add the thyme, cumin, turmeric, salt, and pepper, and cook for another 3 minutes.

• Add the drained lentils and 8 cups (2L) of water to the soup pot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer covered for 45 minutes. Let the mixture cool for 20 minutes. Using an immersion blender, purée the soup for 10 seconds, so that just about one third of the soup is thickened. Add more salt and pepper to taste, and serve.

MODERN BORSCHT: BEET AND PARSNIP PURÉE

Parve, Gluten-free, Vegan, Passover • Serves 10

When I was growing up, borscht, or Eastern European beet soup, came in a jar, and I remember that my father, Reubin Marcus, z”l (may his memory be a blessing), was the only one in the family who ate it. I also remember eating canned beets on occasion and not really liking them. Fast-forward forty-five-plus years, and beets are now one of the trendiest vegetables, valued for their vitamin C, folate, and fiber content. You can serve this thoroughly modern soup hot or cold. When I serve it hot, I add a dollop of thick, creamy coconut milk on top of each bowl (to mimic the classic sour cream garnish) and a sprig of dill; when I serve it cold, I garnish the soup with thin round slices of a half-sour pickle.

PREP TIME: 8 minutes • COOK TIME: 35 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, vegetable peeler, can opener, large saucepan or soup pot, immersion blender or food processor, ladle, teaspoon

1 tablespoon avocado, sunflower, or safflower oil

2 large onions, halved and sliced

1 pound (450g) parsnips, peeled and cut into 2-inch (5-cm) chunks

3 large beets, peeled and cut into 2-inch (5-cm) chunks

6 cups (1.4L) water

1 large bunch dill, about 1½ cups (75g) loosely packed, plus some for garnish (optional)

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon white pepper

¹⁄³ cup (80ml) canned coconut milk (the creamy, not thin kind), optional)

1 half-sour pickle, halved the long way and sliced thin, for garnish (optional)

• In a large saucepan or soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat and add the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the onions look translucent. Add the parsnips, beets, and water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Skim off any dirty foam. Add the dill, salt, and white pepper, and reduce the heat to low; simmer covered for 30 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft.

• Purée the mixture for a full 5 minutes using an immersion blender, or purée in batches in a food processor. Add more salt and white pepper to taste.

• Serve the soup hot with a dollop of creamy coconut milk and a sprig of dill, or cold with sliced pickles, if desired.

SPLIT PEA SOUP WITH BARLEY AND PINK BEANS

Parve, Vegan • Serves 10

Split pea is one of my favorite soups to order in a kosher deli, where it usually comes very thick and is served with croutons. When I was growing up, my mother would put slices of hot dogs in the soup to mimic the chunks of ham featured in non-kosher split pea soup recipes. As a kid, I was certain that adding hot dogs to any dish was a good idea. In my updated version, to remind me of Mom’s recipe, I’ve added pink, speckled Roman beans. This soup takes a long time to cook, because you want to make sure all the peas are cooked thoroughly before turning off the heat.

PREP TIME: Peas and beans soak 8 hours or overnight; 8 minutes • COOK TIME: 2¼ hours • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, vegetable peeler, large bowl, colander, large saucepan or soup pot, silicone spatula

1 pound (450g) green split peas, soaked in 8 cups water overnight

½ cup (90g) Roman beans, soaked in the bowl with the peas

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 large onion, chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

2 stalks celery, chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

2 large carrots, peeled and chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon salt, or more to taste

½ teaspoon white pepper, or more to taste

8 cups (2L) water

¼ cup (50g) pearled barley

Few sprigs fresh thyme, for garnish (optional)

• In a large bowl, place the split peas and beans and 8 cups of water. Cover and soak for 8 hours or overnight. Drain and set aside.

• In a large saucepan or soup pot, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, celery, and carrots and cook for 5 minutes, or until they soften, stirring occasionally.

• Add the turmeric, thyme, salt, and white pepper, stir, and then cook for 1 minute. Add the split peas, beans, and water and bring to a boil. Skim off any dirty-looking foam. Add the barley, reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer for 2 hours, or until peas are soft. Stir the soup every 15 minutes.

• Taste and add more salt and white pepper, if you like. If the soup becomes too thick on the second day, add a little water (¼ cup [60ml] at a time) to thin it out.

VIETNAMESE CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP

Meat, Gluten-Free Serves 10

This is my kosher version of Vietnamese pho soup. I basically took my favorite chicken soup recipe and added ginger and cilantro stems during the cooking, and then added other Asian ingredients after the soup was strained. You can use your own favorite chicken soup recipe and then simply add the other ingredients to create an Asian-flavored broth. I have served this soup for a weeknight dinner. I like rice noodles, but my twins prefer wheat udon noodles.

PREP TIME: 12 minutes • COOK TIME: 2½ hours • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, colander, vegetable peeler, measuring cups and spoons, large saucepan or soup pot, large spoon, medium saucepan, fork, slotted spoon, large sieve, small bowl, tongs, ladle

SOUP

1 whole chicken, cut into quarters or 8 pieces

2 leeks, rinsed and light green and white parts cut into quarters (see Tip)

3 stalks celery, halved

1 fennel bulb, halved

1 large onion, quartered

1 large turnip, peeled and cut into quarters

3 carrots, peeled and cut into thirds

3-inch piece of ginger, peeled and cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces (about 2 ounces [60g])

4 cloves garlic, unpeeled

12 cups water

1 tablespoon black peppercorns

1 bunch cilantro leaves and stems, divided, leaves reserved for garnish

¹⁄³ cup (80ml) tamari soy sauce

4 teaspoons dark miso paste

¼ teaspoon ground ginger

¼ teaspoon black pepper, or more to taste

Hot chili sauce of your choice (optional)

GARNISH

1½ cups (135g) broccoli florets

1 8-ounce package (225-g) rice noodles or other noodles

6 scallions, ends trimmed, sliced

1 red Thai chili, thinly sliced

Hot chili sauce of your choice (optional)

• To make the soup, place the chicken pieces into a large saucepan or soup pot. Add the leeks, celery, fennel, onions, turnips, carrots, ginger, garlic, and water and bring to a boil over high heat. Use a large spoon to skim the dirty foam off the top of the soup. Add the black peppercorns, cover the pot, reduce the heat to low, and let the soup simmer, checking after 5 minutes and skimming off any additional foam Add the cilantro stems, cover, and simmer for 2 hours.

• Meanwhile, prepare the garnishes. Bring a medium saucepan of water to a boil, and then add the broccoli. Cook it for 2 minutes, or until it is fork-tender, and then use a slotted spoon to scoop out the broccoli and transfer it to a bowl. Bring the water to a boil again. Cook the rice noodles according to package directions and drain well.

• When the soup is done, let it cool. Strain the soup through a large sieve, reserving the carrots to slice and later return to the soup when reheating it prior to serving. Reserve the chicken pieces separately.

• Add the soy sauce to the soup. Put 4 tablespoons of the soup into a small bowl and add the miso paste and ground ginger. Stir to dissolve the miso and ginger into the soup, and then return the mixture to the pot. Add pepper to taste and stir the soup. If your family likes spice, add some hot sauce to the soup.

• To serve, shred several pieces of the reserved chicken, cut the carrots on the diagonal into 1-inch (2.5-cm) chunks, and either reheat them separately or add them to the soup. Reheat the broccoli. Reheat the soup until it is very hot. Using tongs, place some noodles into each bowl. Ladle the soup over the noodles. Add some scallions, shredded chicken, cilantro, and sliced red chili to each bowl, or make a buffet of garnishes for your family or guests to create their own combinations. Serve some hot chili sauce alongside for anyone who wants the extra kick.

Cooking for 1 to 2 People or for the Elderly

Singles have often told me that they are overwhelmed by recipes that yield way more food than they could eat alone over several days. Those of us with older parents know that appetites decrease dramatically for people over age 85. For this reason, when my recipes can be made in advance and frozen, I have included freezing instructions. Buy small plastic containers or use freezer bags and divide the dish into the portion size that suits you or the people you will be serving. Remove the containers from the freezer the night before you plan to serve the food and place in the fridge to thaw. If you are making something fresh, like a salad, prepare the full recipe of the dressing but only half the vegetables, or less. Serve what you need and dress only that portion. Save the remaining dressing for another meal.

TUSCAN FARRO SOUP

Meat • Serves 8 to 10

In the summer of 2016, I spent a week at a villa in Tuscany to celebrate my friend Elena Lefkowitz’s fiftieth birthday. Elena and her husband, Jay, kashered the kitchen and hired local chefs Sylvie Tanti and Mariluisa Lovari, who brought all of the kosher ingredients from Rome, to teach us Italian cooking every afternoon. For once, I became the student. I learned how to make fresh ravioli, spaghetti, and even “pici,” a kind of pasta, every strand of which must be rolled out by hand. One afternoon we learned how to make this delicious farro soup. Our chefs made it with veal sausage, but I use a veal chop instead. You can substitute beef or lamb, if you prefer.

PREP TIME: Farro soaks for 30 minutes; soup is best when it sits for 2 hours after cooking • COOK TIME: 1½ hours • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, vegetable peeler, cutting board, knife, small bowl, colander, large saucepan or soup pot

1 cup (200g) farro

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 carrots, peeled and cut into small dice, about ¹⁄³-inch (8-mm) pieces

2 stalks celery, cut into small dice, about ¹⁄³-inch (8-mm) pieces

2 medium onions, cut into small dice, about ¹⁄³-inch (8-mm) pieces

1 veal chop (bone in), about 13 ounces (370g), meat cut into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces and bone reserved

2 medium tomatoes, seeded and chopped into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces

6 cups (1.4L) water

3 sprigs rosemary, leaves finely chopped

16 sage leaves, chopped

1 teaspoon dried sage leaves

1 teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

• Place the farro in a small bowl, and cover with water. Soak for 30 minutes, then drain.

• While the farro is soaking, heat the oil in a large saucepan or soup pot over medium-high heat and add the carrots, celery, and onions. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add veal and the reserved bone and cook for 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and cook for 5 more minutes.

• Add the drained farro and water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and add the rosemary, fresh and dried sage, salt, and pepper. Cover and cook the soup for 1¼ hours, stirring occasionally, until it looks very creamy. Turn off the heat and let the soup sit for at least 2 hours before reheating and then serving it. Add more salt and pepper if needed. The soup may need an additional ½ cup (120ml) water the second day, if it becomes very thick.

BOUILLABAISSE

Fish, Parve • Serves 8 to 10

Bouillabaisse is a fish stew that is popular in the South of France and is typically made with shellfish. I have always wanted to develop a kosher version and created a soup, rather than a stew, that is just as filling. It has all the flavors of the original as well—fennel, orange, tomato, and anise—but I use several types of kosher fish to replace the shellfish and supply a variety of textures. Purple potatoes mimic the black mussels, and red peppers mimic the shrimp in the stew.

PREP TIME: 15 minutes • COOK TIME: 45 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: Broth may be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, vegetable peeler, citrus juicer, large saucepan or soup pot, immersion blender or food processor, aluminum foil, jelly roll pan or roasting pan, ladle

SOUP

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 leeks, white and light green parts only, sliced (see Tip)

1 large onion, halved and sliced

6 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

2 large tomatoes, seeded and chopped

1 fennel bulb, trimmed, halved, and sliced

2 bay leaves

Peel of 1 small orange, scraped off with a vegetable peeler in large pieces

1 teaspoon saffron threads

3 tablespoons pastis or Pernod (licorice-flavored liqueur), divided

3 ounces (85g) skinless flounder fillets

5 cups (1.2L) water

1 tablespoon fresh orange juice, from peeled orange

¼ teaspoon salt

⅛ teaspoon black pepper

Pinch cayenne pepper

GARNISH

2 red bell peppers, cut into 1½-inch (4-cm) pieces

4 fresh artichoke hearts cut into 2-inch (5-cm) pieces

8 small purple or red potatoes, cut into quarters

About 1 pound (450g) fish: a combination of tuna, salmon, and a white fish, cut into ½-inch (12-mm) chunks

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil to drizzle on top

Fennel fronds, for garnish (optional)

• To make the soup, heat the oil in a large saucepan or soup pot over medium heat and add the leeks, onions, garlic, tomatoes, and fennel, and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add bay leaves, orange peel, saffron, 2 tablespoons pastis, flounder, and water and bring to a boil.

• Reduce the heat to low and cook, covered, for 20 minutes, or until vegetables are soft. Remove bay leaves. Let cool for 10 minutes and then purée soup with an immersion blender for a full 3 minutes, or blend in batches in a food processor until very smooth. Add the orange juice, the remaining 1 tablespoon pastis, salt, and pepper to taste. Add cayenne. Taste to correct seasonings. May be made 2 days in advance.

• To make the garnish, preheat oven to broil. Place the bell peppers, artichokes, potato wedges, and fish on a foil-lined jelly roll pan. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons olive oil and use your hands to coat. Roast for 10 minutes, or until peppers are black on the edges and the fish is cooked.

• To serve, reheat the soup and ladle it into bowls. Place some of the pieces of the artichoke and peppers, along with the potatoes and at least one of each type of the fish chunks on top of the soup and garnish with a frond of fennel, if you like.

FRENCH ONION SOUP WITH FLANKEN

Meat, Gluten-free, Passover (without parve cheese) • Serves 8 to 10

French onion soup is one of the most perfect soups to serve on a really cold day. The classic, non-kosher French version includes toasted baguette and cheese on top. Now that parve cheeses are available, feel free to sprinkle some on top.

PREP TIME: 30 minutes; let soup cool 30 minutes before shredding meat • COOK TIME: 1¾ hours • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, large saucepan or soup pot, wooden spoon, tongs

¼ cup (60ml) sunflower, safflower, or extra virgin olive oil

3 pounds (1.5kg) yellow onions, halved and sliced into ½-inch (12-mm) slices, about 10 cups

4 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

2 pounds (1kg) top rib, on the bone (flanken)

6 cups (1.4L) water

1 sprig fresh rosemary

2 sprigs fresh thyme

½ teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon black pepper

• Using your widest soup pot (the larger the pot, the better it is for browning), heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions and cook them for 30 minutes, stirring every 4 to 5 minutes, until they are well browned but not burned. Reduce the heat if they start to burn. Add the garlic and cook for another 5 minutes.

• Move the onions to the side of the pot and add the meat, trying to fit all the meat on the bottom of the pot. If you reduced the heat while cooking the onions, raise it back to medium-high. Using tongs, brown the meat on both sides, for 3 minutes total.

• Add the water, rosemary, and thyme, and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, add the salt and pepper, cover the pot, and cook for 1¼ hours, or until the meat is soft. Let the soup cool for 30 minutes. Remove the stems from the rosemary and thyme.

• Remove the meat from the soup and use your hands or a knife to shred the meat, discarding any visible fat. Place the meat back into the soup pot. Taste and add more salt and pepper if desired and reheat to serve.

TZATZIKI SOUP

Dairy, Vegetarian, Passover • Serves 6 to 8

This soup has the flavor of the classic Greek side dish. Serve it on a really hot day, as it is very refreshing and also packs a lot of nutrition.

PREP TIME: 8 minutes; 3 hours to chill • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 2 days in advance; needs 3 hours to chill • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, measuring cups and spoons, citrus juicer, food processor or blender, large bowl, ladle

2 English cucumbers, unpeeled, halved, and cut into thirds, plus 1 small cucumber or ¹⁄³ additional English cucumber, for garnish

1 large shallot, peeled and quartered

2 cloves garlic

¹⁄³ cup (17g) fresh dill

¹⁄³ cup (17g) Italian parsley leaves

12 mint leaves

2 scallions, ends trimmed, divided

2 cups (480g) Greek yogurt

1 cup (240ml) water

1 tablespoon honey

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (from 1 lemon)

¼ teaspoon salt

Pinch white pepper

¼ cup (30g) walnut halves, crushed, for garnish (optional)

• In a food processor or blender, place two of the cucumbers, the shallots, garlic, dill, parsley, mint, one scallion, and the yogurt, water, honey, and lemon juice and purée until the soup is completely smooth. Add the salt and white pepper and process again. Taste to correct seasonings. Place the soup in a large bowl in the fridge for at least 3 hours. This may be done 2 days in advance.

• When ready to serve, cut the additional cucumber into ½-inch (12-mm) cubes and slice the remaining scallion into thin slices. Ladle the soup into bowls and garnish with some cucumbers and scallions. Sprinkle the crushed walnuts on top, if desired.

WATERMELON, PEACH, AND MINT GAZPACHO

Parve, Gluten-free, Passover • Serves 10

This refreshing summer soup is best served with a watermelon, scallion, and avocado garnish, so don’t skimp on that. For adult guests, I sometimes add a few teaspoons of ice-cold vodka or tequila to the soup.

PREP TIME: 8 minutes; 4 hours to chill • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 2 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, citrus juicer, small bowl, food processor or blender, large bowl

8 cups (1.3kg) watermelon, cubed and divided

2 large ripe yellow peaches, unpeeled, pitted, and cut into 1½-inch (4-cm) cubes, about 4 cups

1 English cucumber, unpeeled, and cut into chunks

¹⁄³ cup (20g) fresh mint leaves

¹⁄³ cup (35g) chopped red onions

1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger

Juice of ½ lime

1 tablespoon honey

½ teaspoon black pepper

3 scallions, ends trimmed, sliced, for garnish (optional)

1 ripe avocado, cubed, for garnish (optional)

• Separate 1 heaping cup of cubed watermelon from the 8 cups (1.3kg) total and chop it into 1/4-inch (6-mm) cubes. Set them aside in a small bowl and chill until ready to serve.

• In batches, place the peaches, cucumbers, remaining 7 cups (1kg) watermelon, mint leaves, red onions, and ginger into a blender or food processor and purée until smooth. Transfer the mixture to a large bowl or container. Add the lime juice, honey, and pepper and stir. Chill the gazpacho for 4 hours or overnight. Garnish with the reserved cup of watermelon cubes, scallions, and avocados. You could also add sliced peaches, small-cubed cucumbers, and diced red onion in whatever combination you prefer.

Meat

Main Dishes

Arroz con Pollo with Brown Rice and Salsa Verde

Indian Barbecued Chicken

Whole Roasted Chicken with Quinoa and Pine Nut Stuffing

Coq au Vin Blanc

Sage and Shallot Roast Turkey with Whole-Wheat Stuffing

Baked Schnitzel with Nut Crust

Brisket Bourguignon

Feijoada: Brazilian Cholent with Collard Greens and Farofa

Grilled Steak with Everything Marinade

Japanese Lamb Chops

ARROZ CON POLLO WITH BROWN RICE AND SALSA VERDE

Meat, Gluten-free • Serves 6

If you have The New Passover Menu, my third cookbook, you might already know and love Betty Supo’s recipe for spicy Peruvian salsa verde, her delicious green sauce. Although it was paired there with a simple Peruvian roasted chicken, here it is served the way it is meant to be—with arroz con pollo, chicken with rice. It is an entire meal in a dish. This recipe requires a little more work than most chicken recipes, but it is really worth the effort. I would suggest serving it on Sukkot.

PREP TIME: 25 minutes • COOK TIME: 55 minutes for rice; 28 minutes for chicken • ADVANCE PREP: The salsa may be made up to 1 week in advance and stored in the fridge; chicken and rice may be made 2 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, small or medium saucepan, medium frying pan, silicone spatula, fork, food processor, 2 small bowls, large frying pan, tongs, Dutch oven or large saucepan

PERUVIAN GREEN RICE

2 cups (380g) brown rice

6 cups (1.4L) water, divided

4 teaspoons sunflower, safflower, or canola oil

1 large or 2 small onions, finely chopped

4 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

½ teaspoon ground turmeric

½ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon black pepper

½ teaspoon salt, divided

1 large bunch cilantro leaves

½ jalapeño pepper, seeded

1 cup (135g) frozen peas and carrots

SALSA VERDE

2 tablespoons sunflower or safflower oil

4 cloves garlic, halved

1 medium onion, halved and sliced

2 jalapeño peppers, halved (see Tip)

1 large or 2 small bunches cilantro leaves

½ cup (120ml) water

½ teaspoon kosher salt

CHICKEN

2 teaspoons sunflower, safflower, or canola oil, divided

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon garlic powder

½ teaspoon black pepper

½ teaspoon salt

1 whole chicken, cut into 8 pieces

• In a small or medium saucepan, bring the brown rice to a boil in 4½ cups (1L) water. Cover the saucepan and simmer for 45 minutes, or until all the water has been absorbed. May be made 2 days in advance.

• While the rice is cooking, prepare the salsa verde. Heat the oil in a medium frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the onions and cook for 3 to 5 minutes over medium-high heat, or until the onions soften and are lightly browned. Add the jalapeño halves, cut side down, and cook for 1 minute. Turn them over and then cook for another 4 minutes, over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until the jalapeños are fork-tender.

• Let the aromatics cool for 15 minutes. Then transfer them to a food processor. Add the cilantro, water, and salt and process until the mixture is thoroughly puréed and smooth. Pour into a small bowl and set aside. May be made 1 week in advance.

• Next, to prepare the chicken, in a large frying pan heat the oil over medium-high heat. In a small bowl, combine the turmeric, cumin, garlic powder, black pepper, and salt and rub the mixture all over the chicken pieces. Place the chicken pieces into the hot pan, skin side up, and let them cook undisturbed for 4 minutes. Then turn over the pieces and brown for another 4 minutes. Remove them from the pan.

• Now return to the rice ingredients. In a large Dutch oven or large saucepan, heat 2 teaspoons of the oil over medium heat. Add the onions and cook them for 6 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add the garlic and cook for another 2 minutes. Add the turmeric, cumin, black pepper, and ¼ teaspoon salt and mix well. Place the chicken pieces on top with ½ cup (120ml) water, then cover and cook over medium heat for 20 minutes. The mixture should be bubbling the whole time.

• Transfer the chicken to a platter and cover it to keep it warm. Place the cilantro leaves, jalapeño, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ½ cup (120ml) water in the bowl of a food processor and purée for 1 minute, or until the mixture is entirely liquefied. Scrape down the sides if needed. Pour this mixture into the Dutch oven or saucepan, over the onions. Add remaining ½ cup (120ml) water to the food processor bowl, swirl it around, and then pour it into the Dutch oven or saucepan, and stir. Cook the mixture over medium-low heat for 3 minutes.

• Fluff the cooked rice, add it to the onions and green purée mixture, and then stir until it is all mixed in. Add the peas and carrots on top, cover the pot, and cook for 10 minutes over low heat. Place the chicken pieces on top of the rice and heat over low heat for another 5 to 10 minutes, or until the chicken is hot.

• To serve, scoop up some rice and chicken and plate it with the green sauce alongside.

Jalapeños

If you have fewer jalapeños than is called for in a recipe, you can use what you have and include the seeds in the dish. But add chili seeds to a recipe only if you are looking to add extra heat and intense spice.

INDIAN BARBECUED CHICKEN

Meat, Gluten-free, Passover • Serves 6

Once a year I prepare a full Indian dinner for Shabbat. About two years ago, my friend Rick Silber decided to join me. We compiled a fabulous menu that included this chicken, inspired by recipes from a community cookbook produced in Chicago by women from the Kerala region of India. It is definitely spicy, but not too spicy for me, and sadly, I cannot tolerate much spice.

PREP TIME: 5 minutes • COOK TIME: 40 to 60 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 2 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Cutting board, knife, measuring cups and spoons, large roasting pan, food processor, silicone spatula, tongs, fork

1 chicken, cut into 8 pieces

3 scallions, ends trimmed, cut into thirds

1 medium onion, cut into quarters

2-inch (5-cm) piece fresh ginger, roughly chopped, about 2½ tablespoons chopped

½ cup (20g) packed cilantro leaves

¼ cup (60ml) fresh lemon juice (from 1 to 2 lemons)

3 tablespoons coconut oil

5 cloves garlic, chopped

1 tablespoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon ground cardamom

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon ground red pepper

2 jalapeños or other green chilies, seeds removed, cut into quarters

• Place the chicken in a large roasting pan that you can use later to bake the chicken. Place the scallions, onions, ginger, cilantro, lemon juice, coconut oil, garlic, turmeric, cardamom, salt, red pepper, and jalapeños into the bowl of a food processor, and process into a paste.

• Using a silicone spatula or gloved hand, spread the paste all around the chicken pieces. Cover and place the chicken in the fridge for at least 2 hours or overnight.

• If you’re cooking the chicken in the oven, preheat it to broil. Turn on your outdoor grill, and when the temperature is approximately 550°F (290°C), using tongs, place the chicken pieces on the grill skin side down. Grill for about 8 to 10 minutes, and then baste the chicken with some paste, turn the chicken over, and baste it again. Grill the chicken for another 5 to 8 minutes, until both sides are well browned, but not black. Place the pieces into another pan and bake them, uncovered, for 20 minutes or until the juices run clear when the chicken is pierced with a fork.

• If you’re using the oven, broil the chicken for 20 minutes, or until it is black and crispy, and then reduce the heat to 350°F (180°C). Bake the chicken for another 30 to 40 minutes or until the juices run clear when the chicken is pierced with a fork.

Unsticking Grilled Chicken

When cooking chicken pieces on the grill skin side down, after you place the pieces on the grill, count to 10 and then lift up the pieces and put them back down on the grill—this will prevent sticking. This method also works for skinless, boneless chicken.

WHOLE ROASTED CHICKEN WITH QUINOA AND PINE NUT STUFFING

Meat, Gluten-free, Passover • Serves 6

Many people find quinoa too dry. This recipe, in which about a third of the quinoa is stuffed into a whole chicken, results in a very moist side dish.

PREP TIME: 30 minutes • COOK TIME: 1 hour • ADVANCE PREP: Stuffing may be made 2 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, small saucepan with lid, large frying pan with 2-inch (5-cm) sides or shallow wide saucepan, 2 small bowls, medium bowl, large roasting pan, small baking dish, aluminum foil, kitchen glove or quart-size plastic bag, tongs, fork, large spoon, kitchen scissors

STUFFING

1 cup (180g) quinoa

2 cups (480ml) water

¾ cup (100g) pine nuts

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 stalks celery, cut into ¼-inch (6-mm) pieces

2 large shallots, chopped

3 cloves garlic, chopped

1 red bell pepper, chopped into ¼-inch (6-mm) dice

1 yellow or orange bell pepper, chopped into ¼-inch (6-mm) dice

½ teaspoon ground turmeric

½ teaspoon ground cumin

¾ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

CHICKEN

1 whole chicken

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

½ teaspoon ground turmeric

½ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon dried thyme

¼ teaspoon ground ginger

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

• To make the stuffing, place the quinoa and water in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pot, and simmer for 15 minutes, or until all the water has been absorbed.

• Heat a large frying pan or a shallow wide saucepan over medium heat. Add the pine nuts and cook them, stirring often, until they’re toasted. Do not leave them unattended. Transfer the pine nuts to a small bowl to cool.

• In the same pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the celery, shallots, and garlic and cook for 5 minutes. Add the bell peppers, turmeric, cumin, salt, and black pepper, mix well, and cook for 5 more minutes. Add the cooked quinoa to the pan and mix it well. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring often. Transfer the mixture to a medium bowl and let it cool. May be made 2 days in advance.

• When you’re ready to stuff the chicken, add the toasted pine nuts to the quinoa mixture and mix them in.

• To make the chicken, preheat the oven to 450°F (230°C). Place the chicken in a large roasting pan. Stuff as much of the quinoa mixture as you can fit into the cavity of the chicken. Place any leftover stuffing in a small baking dish, cover it with aluminum foil, and set aside. Drizzle the oil over the chicken. In a small bowl, combine the turmeric, cumin, thyme, ginger, salt, and pepper. Using a kitchen glove or a quart-size plastic bag to cover your hand, rub the mixture all over the chicken. Place the chicken, breast side down, in the roasting pan.

• Roast the chicken for 20 minutes. Using tongs, carefully turn the chicken over and roast it, breast side up, for another 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350°F (180°C). Add the covered pan of extra stuffing to the oven. Roast the chicken for another 20 minutes, or longer, until the juices run clear when you pierce the chicken with a fork.

• Let the chicken sit for 5 minutes. Scoop out the stuffing and combine it with the stuffing that was cooked separately. Add a little of the pan juice to the stuffing and mix it in. If you made the quinoa earlier in the day, reheat it before serving. Use kitchen scissors to cut up the chicken. Serve the chicken pieces over the stuffing and drizzle some of the pan juices over the top.

Cooking for a Large Crowd: Can Every Recipe Be Doubled without Trouble?

I often double dessert recipes without any problem. When it comes to a meat or chicken recipe where the protein in cooked in a sauce, I can double the meat or chicken amount without doubling the sauce ingredients.

COQ AU VIN BLANC

Meat, Gluten-Free, Passover • Serves 4 to 6

Coq au vin, French for chicken with wine, is traditionally made with red wine and is a classic winter dish. This lighter version, made with white wine, can be enjoyed year round. If you can find kumquats, use them, as they give the dish a sharp orange flavor. If kumquats are out of season, use sliced oranges cut into small triangles (keep the peel on). I have also prepared this dish with varying qualities of white wine, always with good results.

PREP TIME: 20 minutes • COOK TIME: ½ hour • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 2 days in advance • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, large frying pan, tongs, 9 x 13-inch (23 x 33-cm) roasting pan, large spoon, aluminum foil, small saucepan

1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil, divided

1 chicken, cut into 8 pieces

3 large shallots, halved and sliced thinly

2 leeks, white and light green parts only, sliced into ¼-inch (6-mm) slices (see Tip)

1 onion, cut into ¼-inch (6-mm) slices

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

1 head garlic, cloves separated but unpeeled

1 bottle (750 ml) white wine

3 sprigs fresh rosemary

6 sprigs fresh thyme

1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon

10 kumquats, each sliced into 4 pieces, or 3¹⁄³-inch (8-mm) orange slices, peel intact, cut into 8 triangles

8 to 10 ounces (225 to 280g) pearl onions

• Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). In a large frying pan, heat 2 teaspoons of the olive oil over medium-high heat. Using tongs, add the chicken in batches and brown it well on both sides, about 4 minutes per side. Place the browned chicken into a 9 x 13-inch (23 x 33-cm) roasting pan.

• Reduce the heat to medium-low and add the remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil to the frying pan. Place the shallots, leeks, and onions in the pan and cook them, scraping up the browned bits from the chicken, for about 6 to 8 minutes, until they start to brown. Add salt and pepper and stir.

• Scoop the shallot, leek, and onion mixture out of the frying pan and place it under the chicken pieces in the roasting pan. Do not wash the frying pan. Scatter the garlic cloves around the chicken. Pour the wine on top. Add the rosemary and thyme sprigs and sprinkle the tarragon over the chicken pieces. Place the kumquats or orange pieces on top of the chicken.

• Cover the roasting pan tightly with aluminum foil and bake for 1 hour.

• Meanwhile, bring a small saucepan of water to a boil, add the pearl onions, boil them for 2 minutes, then drain off the water. When the onions are cool enough to handle, cut off their ends and squeeze them out of their skins. Heat the unwashed frying pan over medium heat and add the pearl onions. Cook them for about 5 minutes, shaking the pan often, so that the onions brown on all sides. Set the pan aside.

• After the chicken has cooked for 1 hour, remove the foil, add the pearl onions and cook for another 30 minutes, uncovered, and serve.

SAGE AND SHALLOT ROAST TURKEY WITH WHOLE-WHEAT STUFFING

Meat, Passover (just turkey, not stuffing) • Turkey breast serves 6; stuffing serves 10

Thanksgiving Day was the second to last day of shiva for my mother in 2015. It also happened to be my parents’ wedding anniversary. We didn’t know what was appropriate to do: We needed dinner, and my children wanted Thanksgiving food, yet we didn’t want to feel like we were celebrating. My mother-in-law and sister-in-law ordered roast turkey and simple sides, although a full kosher Thanksgiving meal showed up. All day long I was dreading how sad it would be to be together for a holiday without Mom. As it turned out, two of my closest friends and their families came by to pay a shiva call right when we were sitting down to eat. The house became hectic as we added more chairs to the table and set up tables for the teens in other rooms of the house. Rather than eating a somber meal, we felt enveloped by love and comfort, precisely the goal of shiva and what my mother would have wanted for us.

Note: If you are making a whole turkey, double the rub ingredients.

PREP TIME: 20 minutes • COOK TIME: 1 hour 20 minutes for turkey breast, 15 minutes per pound for whole turkey • ADVANCE PREP: Stuffing may be made 1 day in advance • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, large frying pan or wide saucepan, large roasting pan, 9 x 13-inch (23 x 33-cm) baking pan, small bowl, aluminum foil, meat forks, carving knife, sieve, silicone spatula

STUFFING

¼ cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil

1 large onion, chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

1 shallot, finely chopped

4 stalks celery (include leaves), chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

1 large green apple, peeled and chopped into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces

2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves

2 teaspoons dried sage leaves

8 cups (3kg) whole-wheat bread cubes, or stale Whole-Wheat Onion Challah

¾ cup (100g) dried cranberries

½ cup (120ml) Port, Marsala, or red wine

½ cup (120ml) water or homemade chicken stock

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

TURKEY

1 5- to 6-pound (2.3- to 2.7-kg) turkey breast

1 large shallot, halved and finely chopped

½ cup (18g) loosely packed fresh sage leaves

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

⅛ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

• Preheat oven to 450°F (230°C).

• To prepare the stuffing, heat the oil over medium-

high heat in a large frying pan or wide saucepan. Add the onions, shallots, and celery and cook for 10 to 12 minutes, or until vegetables are soft.

• Meanwhile, rinse and dry the turkey and place it in a large roasting pan. In a small bowl, mix the shallot, sage, olive oil, salt, and pepper and mix well. Rub the mixture all over the turkey, inside and out. Add more pepper if desired. Roast the turkey for 20 minutes. (If you’re using a whole turkey, prepare the stuffing first and let it cool before stuffing the turkey.)

• When the vegetables for the stuffing are soft, add the apple, thyme, and sage and cook the mixture for another 3 minutes. Add the bread cubes and cranberries and toss well. Cook for 2 minutes and keep mixing. Add the wine, water or stock, salt, and pepper, and stir and cook the mixture for another 2 minutes. It can be made 1 day in advance and stored in the fridge.

• After the turkey has browned, turn the oven down to 325°F (160°C) and roast the turkey for another hour, or until the juices run clear and a thermometer reads 160°F (70°C). Place the stuffing into a 9 x 13-inch (23 x 33-cm) baking pan, cover it with aluminum foil, and bake it at the same time as the turkey, on another rack in the oven, or separately, later on, for 45 minutes to 1 hour. If you’re roasting a whole turkey, roast it for 15 minutes per pound, or until the juices run clear. You can also test doneness by jiggling one of the turkey legs: If it comes away easily from the side of the bird, it’s done.

• Using meat forks, transfer the turkey to a platter or cutting board and let it rest 15 to 20 minutes before carving. To make the gravy, add ½ cup (120ml) hot water to the roasting pan, stir it into the pan juices using a silicone spatula, and then strain it through a sieve into a bowl or gravy boat. Reheat if necessary.

• Serve the turkey hot with stuffing and gravy, or cold in salads and sandwiches.

Thawing Frozen Meat and Turkey

The safest way to defrost meat is to plan ahead and thaw it in the fridge overnight. To thaw faster, soak the wrapped meat in cold water for a few hours. Some people soak wrapped meat in hot water, but only do that for less than 9 minutes. You can also use the “defrost” setting on the microwave, but be careful not to let the meat cook. A whole turkey should thaw for two days in the fridge.

BAKED SCHNITZEL WITH NUT CRUST

Meat, Gluten-free, Passover • Serves 4 to 6 (8–10 slices)

My goal with this recipe was to bake it first, rather than frying it, and then see if I could come up with a gluten-free coating that everyone would love. This schnitzel is great cold after the first day. It should be made after Passover when, if you’re anything like me, you’ll have leftover ground nuts in your pantry. You can also use the same baking method with your favorite schnitzel breadcrumbs.

PREP TIME: 10 minutes • COOK TIME: 15 minutes • ADVANCE PREP: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • EQUIPMENT: Measuring cups and spoons, cutting board, knife, 2 jelly roll pans, food processor, 2 shallow bowls, gallon-size freezer bag or shallow bowl, large plate, tongs

2 to 2½ pounds (910g to 1.2kg) chicken scaloppini (thin slices), about 10 pieces

3 tablespoons sunflower oil, divided

1 cup (120g) shelled pistachios

1 cup (120g) slivered almonds

½ cup (45g) ground hazelnuts (filberts)

1½ teaspoons ground turmeric

2 teaspoons ground cumin

2 teaspoons paprika

2½ teaspoons ground ginger

2 teaspoons garlic powder

¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

2–3 large eggs, as needed to coat all the pieces

1 cup (110g) chickpea flour (or potato starch)

Sprigs of Italian parsley, for garnish (optional)

• Preheat the oven to 475– 480°F (245– 250°C). Place 1½ tablespoons of oil on each of 2 jelly roll pans and spread to coat. Place the pistachios, almonds, and ground hazelnuts into the bowl of a food processor. Add the turmeric, cumin, paprika, ginger, garlic powder, cayenne, salt, and black pepper. Process until the nuts have been reduced to very small pieces, but not ground into a powder. Place them in a shallow bowl.

• Crack two of the eggs into a shallow bowl and beat them well. Place the chickpea flour into a gallon-size freezer bag or a shallow bowl (the freezer bag works well). Cut the chicken into as many pieces as you like and, using your fingers, dip each into the chickpea flour to coat it completely, shaking off any excess. Then dip the pieces into the beaten eggs and press them into the nut mixture to completely coat the chicken. Place the chicken on a large plate and set it aside. Wash your hands with warm soapy water.

• When the oven is preheated, place the oil-coated pans into the oven and heat for 5 minutes. When the jelly roll pans are hot, very carefully remove one pan at a time and add the chicken, leaving a little room between each piece so that they don’t touch each other. Put the pans back in the oven and bake the chicken for 10 minutes. Using tongs, turn over the pieces and bake them for another 5 minutes. Rotate the pans halfway through the cooking time so that each pan has a turn on the bottom rack to ensure maximum crunchiness. Serve immediately.

 

From Kosher classics to gourmet international dishes, this is Jewish soul food . . . finally made healthy!

Too often, Jewish cookbooks still feature many recipes that lack whole grains and include too much salt, fat, sugar, and processed foods. But Paula Shoyer’s delicious take on Jewish cooking is different: she uses only natural ingredients and offers a fresh, nutrient-dense spin on every dish. Here you’ll find very little frying, and no margarine, frozen puff pastry, soup stocks and powders, and most jarred sauces. More than 60 recipes recipes include both Sephardic and Ashkenazy Jewish classics (Israeli Herb and Almond Salad, Sourdough Challah, Tzimmes Puree, Potato and Scallion Latkes, Schnitzel with Nut Crust) as well as American and international dishes that extend beyond the Jewish culinary world. In Shoyer’s words: “This book has food you’ll recognize, because you still want to feel connected to your ancestors’ kitchens, but I’ve made it more nutritious and often easier to make.”

The array of delicious international dishes includes: 
Arroz con Pollo with Brown Rice and Salsa Verde * Korean Bibimbap with Tofu * Bouillabaisse  *  Cambodian Spring Rolls with Lime Chili and Peanut Dipping Sauce *  Feijoada (Brazilian Cholent with Collard Greens and Farofa)  *  Fish Tacos with Cilantro Lime Rice *  Indian Barbecue Chicken * Japanese Lamb Chops  *  Vietnamese Chicken Noodle Soup  *  and much more!

ssh

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